summer camp 2 : the first mark

Hey there, Campers! Welcome to week 2 of 15 at AFYE Summer Camp… but before we dive in, I want to show you just a handful of images created by some of you for last week’s art project (hashtagged #AFYEcamp). They were all so good! This was an Instagram-a-Day project, with an assigned prompt for each day. There were HUNDREDS of images taken because, well, you guys are amazing. Here are just a few from each prompt (photo credits at the bottom of this post) :

Day One : Vintage

Day Two : Wood

Day Three : Make

Day Four : Blue

Day Five : Boat

Day Six : Nature

Day Seven : Snacks

 

Love, love, love (and even a little nod to Twin Peaks). If you wanna see what everybody’s doing, or contribute your own work, just use the hashtag #AFYEcamp. Alright, time for today’s episode:

Art Project No.2 

Collaboration-Nation : “Ruining” perfect white paper can be terrifying… so let someone else do it! Ask a friend or family member to make the first mark (their color and medium of choice) on a white page or on that perfect canvas you’ve been avoiding, and then you take it from there! Work around their mark, over it, whatever. ps. I also suggested having more than one piece (and maybe more than one friend making marks) on the go. This idea is thanks to the wonderful advice from this week’s featured artist…

Artist Example: 

Ah yes, Lola Donoghue. She loves working on BWCs (Big White Canvases) which, quite frankly, seems like a nightmare to me. Here is some of Lola’s work, along with a few studio shots so you can see how many big canvases she manages to fit into her lovely studio in the Irish countryside:

Look at all of those glorious happy accidents and creative potholes!

And finally, I promised these images too. Marcel Duchamp as his alter-ego, ‘Rrose’, photographed by Man Ray:

You’re welcome.

Another week of camp done, another s’moreo eaten! Thank you to Saatchi Art for supporting summer camp, and thanks so much to you for listening! AFYE camp continues next weekend… but until then, be sure to hashtag your ‘first mark made by another’ on Instagram with #AFYEcamp. Have fun, and embrace those happy accidents!

Other links:

  1. Your Inner Critic Is A Big Jerk, by me
  2. Secret Lives of Great Artists, by Elizabeth Lunday
  3. Lola Donoghue on AFYE : Episode 50

*Photo credits from Project No.1, in the order they appear above:

Vintage: 1. @septemberwren  2. @caballo_rosa  3. @vanittasr  //  Wood: 1. @catseatdogsmakes  2. @alabamathirteen  3. @cindymcd  //  Make: 1. @celkovich  2. @thejealouscurator  3. @flyonthewall602  //  Blue: 1. @juliehamiltoncreative  2. @mariko_koda  3. @stephillo  //  Boat: 1. @bababeloco  2. @taytayshenaynay  3. @meganwoodardjohnsonart  //  Nature: 1. @neotimes  2. @emilyezarse  3. @tara.axford  //  Snacks: 1. @vanittasr  2. @modernfibre  3. @heathersundquist

 





aimée henny brown

Gasp! “Shelter”, an installation by Canadian artist Aimée Henny Brown. I’m not sure where to start? The mixed media collages, the pink ranger station… that paper cutting!? Ok, I’ve got no words so I’m handing this over to Aimée :

“Exhibited at the Ranger Station Art Gallery for June, 2015,  the work was inspired by my artist residency in the district of Kent, and through access to archives held at the Agassiz-Harrison Museum and Archives.   Through this body of work, I am visually exploring a period in this area’s history where the land was wild, shelter was provisional and industry was just beginning to imagine its place in the Fraser Valley. The re-presentation of these historical moments is also informed by imagined, alternative visions of what the term shelter can represent. In its most essential form, shelter is depicted as a triangle – an icon of sanctuary and dwelling. The triangle motif is employed throughout the work as a talisman to conjure concepts of protection, survival and home – but it is also the essential geometric building block of geodesic domes, tent structures, gabled walls, pitched roofs and signal flags. In this exhibition, the triangle is both form and metaphor. The aim of this work is to glimpse into local histories while discovering the imaginative potential of digging deeply into this past, and closely examining our relationship with place.”

Beautiful. Happy Friday.





jonathan crowther

Flowers and some very odd vases… glue lids, drink spouts, and of course, a soy sauce fish! These are the wonderful paintings {oil on canvas} of Melbourne based painter Jonathan Crowther. I love everything about these – the realism of the flowers, the fact that those flowers are poking out of glue lids, and the flat/colorful abstract backgrounds. Gorgeous. ps. Jonathan has a new show, featuring a different body of work, that just opened today in Sydney {which I guess would be yesterday there?} at Palmer Art Projects. It runs until June 24th, 2017.

And, because seeing scale {and the artist!} is always fun:





victoria reichelt

Oil paintings. What!? Yes. This is the very analog work of Australian artist Victoria Reichelt, and all of these pieces are part of her latest show, titled Precipice,  that opens on June 1st at This Is No Fantasy Gallery in Melbourne {runs until June 24th}. Why hundreds of little stickers and tiny erasers you ask? Well that takes us back to the whole analog thing …

“For this exhibition Reichelt takes ordinary objects and office stationary, strips them of their context and presents them in a fresh tableaux. These items, which were at one time essential to rational organization and workplace efficiencies, are facing redundancy as we turn our backs more and more on the analogue, in favor of the digital.”

Go if you can! In person. Not online ; )





jacqui morgan

Watercolor and burlesque … a dreamy combination! This is the work of American artist Jacqui Morgan. Does her name sound familiar? It might, as she was one of the first women to work as a full time illustrator in the early 1960s… in fact, one of her claims to fame was a poster for New York’s iconic nightclub, Electric Circus! I received an email from her cousin, Barbara, submitting on behalf of Jacqui. She passed away in 2013 and Barbara is lucky enough to have some of these sassy ladies in her home {a significant remainder of Jacqui’s work went to the Norman Rockwell Museum.} Thanks so much to Barbara for reaching out – I love this work, and I love Jacqui’s inspiring story … Read Jacqui’s very full / interesting bio.





nuria riaza

Portraits, ballpoint pen, and embroidery… I could not think of a better way to kick off a Monday. Sigh. This is the work of Spanish artist/illustrator Nuria Riaza. I just discovered her last week via The Sketchbook Project {Brooklyn}… the second I clicked over to her site I went down the rabbit hole and got completely lost in her beautiful navy blue and blush pink world of weirdness. Happy Monday.





summer camp 1 : au naturel

Hello Campers! Welcome to day 1 of 15 at AFYE Summer Camp! Here are the ins and outs from this first episode:

Art Project No.1 

Instagram-a-Day:  Take one photo each day, every day for the next week … with a camp theme of course! This way there is a starting place, and no excuse not to do it! I’m even going to give you the theme for each day:

Saturday // Vintage  

Sunday // Wood  

Monday // Make  

Tuesday // Blue  

Wednesday // Boat  

Thursday // Nature  

Friday // Snacks

I can’t wait to see what these prompts conjure up for everyone! If you want to share your work along the way {I’m going to}, just use #AFYEcamp 

Artist Examples: 

As promised, images and links for the three artists I mentioned as inspirational examples of self-directed, daily creative assignments. First up, Lisa Congdon and her “Collection A Day” project from 2010:

… and of course a few pieces from Lisa’s 2016 “Experiments in Blue” weekly project:

And, if you’d like to do Lisa’s exercise from Creative Block this week too, please do:

“Choose one thing you love to draw or paint (and feel comfortable drawing or painting) already (an animal, object, a person, whatever). For 30 days, draw or paint that thing 30 different ways, a different way every day. You can use different mediums, expressions, positions, colors, whatever. Each day, push yourself to do something much different than the day before, but keep the thing the same. See how keeping one element constant (in this case, the “thing” you love to draw or paint), can allow you to break out creatively in other ways.” ~ Lisa Congdon, 2014

So fun! Speaking of which… the absolutely gorgeous results of daily walks taken by Australian artist Leonie Barton:

And finally, the obsessive compulsive {and hilarious} daily drawings of Kate Bingaman-Burt:

Pop a toasted marshmallow in my mouth, and that’s that! Thanks so much to Saatchi Art for supporting the first day of summer camp, and thanks so much to you for listening! AFYE camp continues next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Creative Block, by me
  2. Secret Lives of Great Artists, by Elizabeth Lunday
  3. Lisa Congdon on AFYE : Episode 10 / Episode 77
  4. Kate Bingaman-Burt on AFYE : Episode 22
  5. NOTE: I said Georgia O’Keefe’s “ex-husband” – I’m not sure they were actually divorced?

 





sketchbook project, brooklyn art library

Oh, I am so doing this. In fact, my little sketchbook for the Sketchbook Project just arrived in the mail from the Brooklyn Art Library yesterday! Wanna do it too? Yes! We just missed the 2017 cut off, but I’m all in for 2018. Here are the ins and outs of this very cool project (est. 2006):

A GLOBAL ART PROJECT

Submit your work to the world’s largest collection of sketchbooks where it will reside in Brooklyn Art Library’s permanent collection, travel to exhibitions across the country and become part of a massive worldwide community of creative people. Anyone – from anywhere in the world – can be a part of the project. To participate and receive a sketchbook {from $30} which will become part of Brooklyn Art Library and our traveling exhibitions, sign up here.

Sign up by: January 5th, 2018
Postmark by: March 31st, 2018
Exhibition starts: June, 2018 
2018 THEMES : UNDERWATER / THIS IS NOT WHAT IT SEEMS / TEXTURES / LINES AND GRAPHICS / LONG STORIES WITH SHORT ENDINGS / A COMIC BOOK ENDING / NO WORRIES / TACOS / CONNECTIONS / PEOPLE I WISH I KNEW 
I chose, “long stories with short endings” – granted all of these are just starting places, but that one spoke to me. Wish me luck, and please come along for the ride if you’d like to! Happy Friday.
*example sketchbooks above by James Oliver and Nuria Riaza.




katy schmader

Oooh! So. Much. Paper. This lovely take on landscapes is the collage work of Austin based artist Katy Schmader. She does landscape photography as well, but these textured, papery odes to nature took my breath away. I want to climb those clay cliffs, then dive into blue mountain lakes to cool off! These pieces are available, as insanely affordable prints, in Katy’s shop.





bigert & bergstrom

I don’t normally write about architecture, but when you come across a golden solar egg sauna in the most northern part of Sweden… then yeah, it’s time to write about architecture! This is the work of architects Bigert & Bergstrom, and is of course, so much more than an egg shaped sauna. Here is the story behind the egg, the town of Kiruna, and the discussion of climate and sustainable community development:

“Kiruna is currently undergoing a radical transformation, which involves a gigantic move for the whole town. This is so that the mining company LKAB can extract more of the iron seam that cuts diagonally downwards beneath the town. The iron ore is and has been – ever since it first began to be extracted at the end of the 19th century – an important source of income for Sweden, and absolutely vital for the town of Kiruna. No mine, no town. But the breaking up and devastating transformation of the landscape, the environment and the architecture caused by the move are also sparking a lot of debate. Solar Egg has been made as a social sculpture where local people and visitors to the town can meet and, for instance, discuss these challenges. In the arctic climate of Lapland the sauna occupies a key position, as a room for warmth and reflection. B&B have taken up this tradition and developed a sculptural symbol that prompts thoughts of rebirth and an incubator that nurtures conversation and exchanges of ideas. The project is a continuation of the artists strategy to incorporate the climate into the experience of the artwork which was initiated with the Climate Chambers in 1994.

The egg is made out of stainless golden mirror sheeting, its multifaceted form breaking up the surroundings that it reflects into a multiplicity of different mirror images. Landscape, mine, town, sky, sun and snow are here combined into a fragmented image that can evoke associations with the complexity spanned by today’s discussion about climate and sustainable community development.”

Truly brilliant.

{via Colossal}