medium /// ceramic




“the hustle is real”

Yes, that is a ceramic urn custom made for Pants the cat… AMAZING. Today’s episode is filled with weird and wacky ceramics – both functional and sculptural – by Canadian artist Mariko Paterson, aka Forage Studios. You can listen to our conversation right up there under Mr.Pants’ final resting place, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First up, a few of my favorites from her functional portfolio … obviously I had to start off with a little Wonder Woman action!

… and finishing with a lobster bowl! Hilariously awesome.

Next, a few of Mariko’s sculptural pieces, including another urn because I can’t get over how fantastic they are:

Ah, Buddy.

And as always, the Not-so-speedy Speed Round™. I asked her a question about wrestling a luchador … the sole purpose, of course, being an excuse to include these beauties in the post:

Te Amo, too! Yes, I want to eat all of my soups and noodles from a “Forage Studios” luchador bowl from this day forward.

And finally, Mariko and one hairy wiener so you can see who you were listening to:

Awww! So sweet! Thanks to Mariko for taking the time to chat with me, and being so open and honest about “the hustle”; thank you to Saatchi Art, and the wonderful, creative women at THRIVE, for supporting the podcast; and of course, thanks to you for listening! There will be more Art For Your Ear next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Langara College, Vancouver
  2. Alberta College of Art & Design
  3. NASCAD
  4. SOFA Show, Chicago
  5. Molly Hatch episode
  6. Mariko’s Instagram feed
  7. Forage Studios, aka Mariko’s shop

 





susannah montague

Is it possible to be in love while somewhat terrified? Yes, yes it is. This is the beautifully made, sweet ‘n creepy work of Canadian ceramicist Susannah Montague. Butterflies, bones, and babies … I scoured her site looking for the stories behind these gorgeous / scary pieces, but I believe she’s left it up to our imaginations. At this stage all I really know is that I want to ride around in a row boat with a pink beluga.

ps. I do know why Susannah creates these lovely “blastocysts” though…  “This [work] is about my twins as five day old embryos. The day they got transferred into me.”

Beautiful.





lizzie pearce

A self-described “maker of unusual things” … um, yep! Cute meets creepy as little ceramic faces are housed inside felted creatures / mushrooms. This is the whimsical and weird work of UK based artist Lizzie Pearce. I’d love to pick a favorite, but that feels totally impossible. Clearly I need all of them. Happy September!

ps. Some of her work is available in her shop.





martha rieger

Oooooh, “Shibori Bubbles”. This gorgeous ceramic series, from 2016, is the work of Martha Rieger, a Brazilian-Israeli ceramic artist and sculptor, working in Tel Aviv and in Jingdezhen, China.

“In a project from 2016, Martha Rieger created sculptures, shaped as a bubble meeting a horizontal surface, in that fragile moment before snapping. Adventurously crafted by using traditional Chinese techniques and contemporary innovation, the bubble sculptures are hand-painted by Rieger in the Japanese Shibori style, known in its western versions of Tie-Dye or Batik. By using sponges, fishing nets and duct tape, Rieger created an overall illusionistic pattern, transforming each bubble into a world of its own.

Under Rieger’s hands, the intangible short-living bubble, a perfect existence that suddenly breaks, is transformed into an entire universe that lures the viewer to its frozen beauty, encapsulating a potential of longevity, movement and the ability to grasp an existence that seemed impossible.

The manufacturing of the sculptures was a collaboration between Rieger and He Yongjun Lio and Wei Tong’s workshop in Jingdezhen, China.”

Some of Martha’s beautiful work will be shown at The New York Ceramics & Glass Fair in January 2018 (18th – 21st). Pop that in your calendar now!





françoise joris


She had me at ‘porcelain pineapple’. French ceramicist Françoise Joris makes delicate, fantastical objects that are clearly inspired by nature… and fruit (of her imagination AND pineapples) :

“My approach is free and detached from contingencies; It is the fruit of my imagination. 

The completion of a piece gives birth to the design of the next creating a network of invisible but strong links, which continuously fuels my artistic approach and guides my explorations.

So much remains to be said and done with porcelain, a primary and yet so noble material.”

Lovely.





eleni pratsi

Oh my circles! Colors bleeding into each other while contained in perfect circles. This is the work of Paris based painter Eleni Pratsi. I love her work – oil and acrylic on canvas – and I love her reasons for obsessing over circles just as much:

“… Beyond doubt, the circle plays a favourable role in my paintings. Treating the circular form as if it were the unique letter of my plastic alphabet is based on a personal choice and backed up by a childhood memory: when asked by my instructor, at the age of eleven, as I took my first art lesson to draw a circle, this turned out to be perfect, to Eliza’s taste. Consciously or unconsciously I recall her overflowing enthusiasm but also my feeling so proud for having traced a circle, my first circle, a perfect circle. With this childhood experience recorded undoubtedly in my subconscious, ten years later I initiated a series of artistic studies through which I’ve been pursuing, ever since, the perfect circle.”

Mission accomplished. Happy Friday.

{via Saatchi Art}





honor freeman

Old bars of soap and overly-used sponges … that are porcelain! Gasp! This is the magically mundane work of Australian artist Honor Freeman, and these are her words:

“Noticing and quietly commemorating the smaller moments that are a constant rhythm of the everyday continues to be a preoccupation in my work. I seek to make visible the relationship between us and the objects we use, the gestures, mundane activities and humble objects, like small markers silently measuring the hours and marking the days. Thoughts of preserving, measuring and marking time’s passing occupy the work during the making. There is a correlation between actions and gestures used when engaging with objects and those used during the process of making that informs the work.”

Lovely.





emma larsson


Ahhh, yes… it’s hard to tell where her dreamy paintings end and her organic ceramics begin. This is the beautifully bizarre work of Stockholm based artist Emma Larsson. Here is a little bit about her found via her agency, Wood Society of the Arts:

Having previously worked with mostly oil and acrylic, Emma has recently devolved into her own expressive abstract watercolours. She also sculpts ceramics, where the characteristic figures are lifted from the paper to adopt new living forms.

They certainly are! ♥





clémentine de chabaneix

Do I even need to say anything? I mean really, that girl holding an alligator kinda says it all, no? This is the ethereal work of French artist Clémentine de Chabaneix. Here are her words about this weird and wonderful work:

…I work with epoxy resin or ceramic, iron and sometimes wood. I often sculpt young ‘Burtonian’ girls, kind of ‘Alice in Wonderland’, teenagers, romantic, a bit gothic. My work is about leaving childhood, metamorphose, struggle… 

Nailed it. Happy Friday.

{found via Club Sensible’s Instagram feed}





nadiuska & priscila furtado

Ah, the lovely drawings and ceramic work of Brazil based sisters, Nadiuska and Priscila Furtado. They started this collaborative project under the name Uinverso, and this is why:

“As the name means inverted , it is also related to the  universe in physical existence and in the perspective that each species is a universe inserted in another.”

Beautiful. {You can find their work – originals, prints, ceramics, pins – in their shop}