medium /// ceramic




international women’s day

womensday

So many of my favorite artists in one spot, all working toward the same goal. Yep, in honor of International Women’s Day, Uprise Art and the artists featured {just a few shown here} are donating 100% of proceeds from this online exhibition, titled “For the Greater Good”, to Planned Parenthood. Brilliant, beautiful. #Resist

See all of the available originals in this show right here… 100% of proceeds!? Amazing.





crystal morey

crystalmorey

Fierce but fragile … beautiful, elegant, porcelain creatures by American artist Crystal Morey. Here are her words about why she creates what she creates:

“As a species, we sit at a pivotal moment, faced with monumental questions leading to difficult, uncertain answers. My figures exist on this frontier, absorbed in their own feelings of stress, anxiety and ambivalence. Sculpted from the silken white earth of porcelain, I see these delicate figures as containing power – as modern talismans and precious telling objects. They are here to remind us of our current trajectory and potential for destruction and downfall.” 

{Thanks to ceramicist Amanda Smith for pointing me to this lovely work}





juliette clovis

julietteclovis

Oh, mon Dieu! This is the porcelain work of French artist Juliette Clovis. Butterflies, flowers, and spiky growths! Here is part of her statement about this body {pun totally intended} of work:

“… [Juliette’s] women are completely transformed into hybrid beings, mixes of history, myths and chimerical dreams. The female bodies are invaded by a profusion of wildlife and flora elements, evoking a nature that is both soft and worrying. Like a Hitchcock-inspired scene, we can almost hear the noise of the jungle: the flapping of a bird’s wings, the slither of a creeping snake or the croak of a frog.”

Yes! The moment I saw that bird-covered bust, I have to admit… it gave me a little Hitchcock shudder! So glad I didn’t see any snakes in her portfolio.





jeremiah jenkins

JeremiahJenkins

“Everything Must Go” … eventually, yes, I suppose so. This beautiful, nostalgic, and kind of funny series of collaged ceramics {love!} are the work of San Francisco based artist Jeremiah Jenkins. Are they fragile? …

“This is a series of commemorative plates, made from broken commemorative plates. Each one is a fragile idea, breaking and gilding highlights the beauty within that fragility.”

Yes. Very. Jeremiah has a show on right now, until February 25th, at Hashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco. Go, and then email me and tell me how fantastic these pieces are in person! Thank you.





ry rocklen

ryrocklen

I need this wardrobe. Sure, this might just look like a bunch of simple sweaters, jeans, and one very patriotic shirt… until you find out that they’re porcelain! But wait, there’s more. If you want to add a bit of pizazz to your look… copper and nickel plating your hats and shirts is the way to go. Gah! I love this series by LA based artist Ry Rocklen so very much.





zemer peled

zemerpeled1
zemerpeled_show

Wow. Ceramic shards transformed into beautifully bizarre {very sharp} botanicals. I’ve written about Israeli artist Zemer Peled‘s gorgeous work before, but I just had to post about her current solo exhibition, titled “Nomad”. The up-close photos of Zemer’s pieces are gorgeous, but understanding their scale within a space makes them even more crazy amazing. These installation shots are from Mark Moore Gallery in LA where this work will be on display from now until November 5th, 2016. Go… but don’t touch anything. It’s sharp!





courtney mattison

courtneymattison

Oh my. Beautiful and sad all in one glance. This is a glazed stoneware and porcelain installation by American artist/ocean advocate Courtney Mattison, titled “Our Changing Seas III”. Here are her eloquent and inspiring words about this work and her mission:

“This piece explores the rapid transition that corals throughout the tropics and subtropics are making from healthy, colorful and diverse to sickened and bleached as a result of human-caused climate change, which is putting coral reefs into the proverbial “eye of the storm.” At its heart, this piece celebrates my favorite aesthetic aspects of a healthy coral reef surrounded by the sterile white skeletons of bleached corals swirling like the rotating winds of a cyclone. There is still time for corals to recover even from the point of bleaching if we act quickly to decrease the threats we impose. Perhaps if my work can influence viewers to appreciate the fragile beauty of our endangered coral reef ecosystems, we will act more wholeheartedly to help them recover and even thrive.”

Beautiful.

{Thanks to Mariela Di Nardo for pointing me to this work.}





kaye blegvad

kayeblegvad

Elegant ladies and delicate hands ~ sigh ~ this is the lovely work of London-born, Brooklyn-based artist/illustrator Kaye Blegvad. I suddenly feel like burning some incense and doing yoga all afternoon… nude. Hm. Maybe not.





beccy ridsdel

beccyridsdel

Dissected ceramics, peeled back layers, and roses ‘n baby animals as far as the eye can see… oh yeah, I’m in! This is the work of UK based artist Beccy Ridsdel. This series is under the title of “art/craft” in her portfolio, which I find quite interesting. There’s something about the whole art vs. craft thing that totally intrigues me. Apparently it does the same for Beccy… here’s her description of this work:

“The installation takes the form of an observation of a surgical experiment in progress. The ‘surgeon’ is dissecting the craft object to see what is within. He finds craft through and through. He tries the experiment again and again, piling up the dissected work, hoping to see something different but it is always the same.”

{via Colossal}





eleonor boström

eleonorbostrom

Really, what more could you want? Gardening, a spot of tea, or a bit of stitching… these crazy dogs have you totally covered. Gah! I love them so much. This is the ceramic work of Eleonor Boström, a Swedish artist who splits her time between Stockholm and San Francisco. I wrote about her weird ‘n wonderful hounds three years ago… clearly I had to do it again! ps. I don’t sew, but I do need that second to last thread dog. NEED.