medium /// ceramic




amy santoferraro

amysantoferraro

I have written about American artist Amy Santoferraro a few times over the last few years… and here we are again! This is Amy’s found object series, titled “BB Baskets”. I love the objects themselves – juicy little jewels in forgotten ceramic baskets – but when I read how these beauties came to be, well I just had to share:

“My home is across a valley from Fort Riley, Kansas. The Kansas landscape mimics that of Afghanistan and Iraq in color and flatness, making it an ideal training ground for soldiers at the Army base before they head off to war. Everyday I hear and feel the rounds of firing and bombing practice while watching the neighborhood kids shoot each other with BB guns in the convenient overgrown bush hides of my yard. It is quite possibly the most surreal thing I have ever repeatedly experienced.

I started collecting the BBs the kids left in the yard without any clear direction other than picking up and collecting the beautiful balls of color. The collection grew as the days passed, and I gradually began seeing them as material. I love that they can be so many things and don’t readily volunteer their origin story. It’s not essential to appreciate the resulting object and in no way is a statement about war or only a personal narrative.

Sometimes the balls are just balls. But they are also bubbles, fruit, wishes, vomit, bubbling crud, excuses. . . pretty much anything that can build up to be overwhelming, disgusting and/or beautiful. The found baskets in this series fulfill my need to collect evidence of ceramics doing what it does best: masquerading as other objects and materials. One thing mimicking another due to nostalgia or sentiment rather than function or design, or skeuomorphism, is a huge part of my work and practice. I like to think of it as “materials behaving badly.” The materials or objects at home depot, the thrift store, or in my studio are kinda like Girls Gone Wild: they reveal too much, are too fake and are too cheap.”

So. Good.





laura berger

lauraberger_painting

Chicago based artist Laura Berger… so good, right? Well look what she’s doing now… YES! It’s as though her paintings have popped right off the canvas and onto the tabletop. Ceramic versions of her lovely little people:

lauraberger_ceramics

Love.





#5womenartists

A project for today! Listen to this…

The National Museum of Women in the Arts (NWMA), the world’s only major museum solely dedicated to celebrating great women artists, has announced a new social media campaign for this March’s Women’s History Month. If you ask someone to name five artists, they will likely name prominent male artists, but how many people can list five women artists? To increase awareness the museum will launch the campaign “Can you name five women artists?” March 1 on its website and blog as well as on social media outlets, including Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Using the hashtag #5womenartists, the campaign will encourage NMWA’s online community to help address the gender imbalance in the presentation of art both in the United States and internationally.

Oh, I am so in… mind you, I could name 500 women artists that I love, but I’ll play by the rules. Here are 5 of my {many} favorite artists, who also happen to be women:

5women_kilgallen
5women_donovan
5women_rich
5women_smith
5women_anne
5women_MAIER

Alright yes, that was 6, but I had to make sure that the mysterious and talented Vivian Maier was in there too! Ok, now it’s your turn – jump on those social media channels and name #5womenartists whose work you love {contemporary or historical} and help make it really easy for people to be able to name five women artists ♥

{click on the artwork above to see more of their work}





lana filippone

lanafilippone

Beautiful. This piece {and all of those gorgeous close-ups} is part of a series, by Canadian artist Lana Filippone, titled “Recursions. Crystallize”. Here are Lana’s words about her work, and the materials she chooses to create these beautiful worlds with:

[Lana] strives to access a language that allows magic to exist in our everyday lives, whether in her sculptural or functional work. This language harkens back to places that are familiar yet subversive of her material. Humorous nostalgia becoming light physical daydreams in clay, manifest from big ideas. She approaches themes of transience in shared human-experience; ephemeral states solidified in porcelain, ideas about forbearance and a gentle nod to the human Truths, mostly Impermanence. Her material once liquid, is symbolically transformed then crystallized in time.

Photographs by Jonathan Sippel Photography




lindsay feuer

lindsayfeuer

If Dr.Suess was still alive, I think he’d have a huge collection of these porcelain “plants”! This the whimsical, wonderful work of New Jersey based artist Lindsay Feuer. Ah, nature through the beautiful imagination of an artist … such a perfect combination.

{via art is a way}





isaac nichols

isaacnichols

Sometimes you just need to put a plant, or some pencils, or maybe even some candy into a ceramic pot with boobs on it… or faces, if bathing beauties aren’t your jam. These pieces are the work of Brooklyn based artist Isaac Nichols {aka Universal Isaac}, and they made me laugh. The end.





rachel levit

rachellevit

I wrote about the gouache-dotted painted heads of Brooklyn based artist Rachel Levit almost two years ago. Today, it’s allllll about these ceramic heads, from a series titled, you guessed it, Heads. This entire series was cast from the same mold. For real. Simple, striking, beautiful, organic, and little bit sad … or is that just me? Sigh.

*Photos by Josefina Santos




karen millar

karenmillar

Delicate yet strong. This is the “Pod Series” by Australian ceramicist Karen Millar. She explores “the relationship between growth and decay, loss and hope, soft and hard, vulnerable and defensive, light and dark, interior and exterior… There is inherent beauty in the cycle of decay and death, growth and renewal.” Beautiful. I think that final pod, a poppy pod, is my favorite, especially today… lest we forget.





katharine morling

katharinemorling

Oh. Black and white line drawings that have magically become beautiful porcelain objects. Ok, it wasn’t magic, it was UK based artist Katharine Morling. I wrote about her a year and a half ago, but when I saw those matches, well, it was time to write again {and don’t even get me started on that boom box… 1980’s teen flashbacks in progress.} Happy weekend, everyone!





lili scratchy

liliscratchy

Um, how have I been writing this blog for almost seven years yet I’m just finding out about the crazy ceramics of France based artist/illustrator Lili Scratchy? Gah! I love them! Her work literally jumps right out of her sketchbook… see? Oh mon dieu, so much love for these weird little critters, and Lili’s fantastic imagination. Love.