medium /// ceramic




honor freeman

Old bars of soap and overly-used sponges … that are porcelain! Gasp! This is the magically mundane work of Australian artist Honor Freeman, and these are her words:

“Noticing and quietly commemorating the smaller moments that are a constant rhythm of the everyday continues to be a preoccupation in my work. I seek to make visible the relationship between us and the objects we use, the gestures, mundane activities and humble objects, like small markers silently measuring the hours and marking the days. Thoughts of preserving, measuring and marking time’s passing occupy the work during the making. There is a correlation between actions and gestures used when engaging with objects and those used during the process of making that informs the work.”

Lovely.





emma larsson


Ahhh, yes… it’s hard to tell where her dreamy paintings end and her organic ceramics begin. This is the beautifully bizarre work of Stockholm based artist Emma Larsson. Here is a little bit about her found via her agency, Wood Society of the Arts:

Having previously worked with mostly oil and acrylic, Emma has recently devolved into her own expressive abstract watercolours. She also sculpts ceramics, where the characteristic figures are lifted from the paper to adopt new living forms.

They certainly are! ♥





clémentine de chabaneix

Do I even need to say anything? I mean really, that girl holding an alligator kinda says it all, no? This is the ethereal work of French artist Clémentine de Chabaneix. Here are her words about this weird and wonderful work:

…I work with epoxy resin or ceramic, iron and sometimes wood. I often sculpt young ‘Burtonian’ girls, kind of ‘Alice in Wonderland’, teenagers, romantic, a bit gothic. My work is about leaving childhood, metamorphose, struggle… 

Nailed it. Happy Friday.

{found via Club Sensible’s Instagram feed}





nadiuska & priscila furtado

Ah, the lovely drawings and ceramic work of Brazil based sisters, Nadiuska and Priscila Furtado. They started this collaborative project under the name Uinverso, and this is why:

“As the name means inverted , it is also related to the  universe in physical existence and in the perspective that each species is a universe inserted in another.”

Beautiful. {You can find their work – originals, prints, ceramics, pins – in their shop}





“suitcase full of shards”

Imagine if you will, a little girl growing up in a kibbutz in Israel who now travels the world – her suitcase filled with tiny hammers and shards of colorful ceramics. Well, no need to imagine because I’ve got her on the podcast! Yep, today I’m talking to Israeli artist Zemer Peled … from the big island of Hawaii. She’s there working on a commission for a private collector, before she jets off to France for a residency in Limoges. Sigh. Alrighty, you can listen right up there underneath that beautiful spiky thing, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First up, Zemer in action. Hammers, shards, goggles… because, safety first:

🔨Just another day at the studio 🔨

A post shared by Zemer Peled (@zemerpeled) on


Isn’t that video meditative? But sharp! Ok, next… these are Zemer’s flowers that I wrote about a couple of years ago. You’ll notice they start in blue and white, thanks to her interest in Japanese ceramics, and then slowly evolve into some crazy shapes and exotic color combos:

I mean, come on! GORGEOUS! The detail is astounding, and her patience is awe-inspiring. Well we’re not done yet… the evolution continued from there! Her flowers started growing and twisting, and some might even say, they began to dance:

Truly amazing. So. Many. Shards.

Next, her colors! She did start with blue and white as I mentioned above, but much like her colorful personality, Zemer’s work is now filled with a rainbow of beautifully broken bits:

Ahhhh, and yes, those are the flower photos she took while in Hawaii. I see many future pieces & palettes that will be inspired by those beauties! {ps. about half way through the images above you’ll see the floral piece she was working on in Hawaii… partly hidden behind some perfectly coordinated local flora.}

Zemer’s work is beautiful, but let’s not forget THE DANGER. I asked if she ever cuts herself. Her response.. ‘Oh, all the time! :

Bleeding fingers and giant kilns… be safe Zemer, be safe {you have to be healthy when you marry your mystery Canadian!} Thanks so much to Zemer for talking to me instead of going to the beach, and thanks as always to Saatchi Art for supporting the episode. Now, next week is the last week in Art For Your Ear’s Season 1, but I’ve got a fun plan for the summer until September when Season 2 starts. I’ll give you all of the details next week! Thanks for listening, there will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Royal College of Art, London
  2. Archie Bray Foundation, Montana
  3. Bernardaud, Limoges France
  4. Amanda Smith episode
  5. Banff Centre, Canada

 





vanessa hogge

Dahlias, chrysanthemums, and hydrangeas, oh my! These lovely porcelain blooms are part of “Wallflowers”, a series by London based ceramicist Vanessa Hogge. The detail is gorgeous, and the reason …  “she takes an instinctive, visceral approach to each piece, painstakingly sculpting every petal and anther by hand so that no two flowers are identical.” Ahhh, hundreds of handmade petals! I wish I had that kind of patience, but, I do not. No, I choose to spend that kind of time staring at work like Vanessa’s. Happy first day of May!





yunhee lee

Gasp! This is the absolutely gorgeous ceramic work of Korean artist Yunhee Lee. The detail, the gold, and of course my weakness, portraits of women. Here is a description of her work, found on Gallery Huue’s {Singapore} website:

“Lee calls herself a collector: collector of common stories around her, regarding people’s insatiable desires, fears, anxieties and the cure they search and find to overcome them. She takes note of these ‘curing processes’ and bring them to life with her hands using clay as a medium. Layers of variously sized units and the splendid patterns and colors have created a beautifully delicate and refined artwork that has come to define Lee’s artistic style.”

Beautiful.





“an opportunistic optimist”

This post is filled to the brim with so much amazing work, AND such an interesting back story! From a dairy farm, to art school, to working in flooded basements to selling huge installations in New York. Yep, Molly Hatch has seen it all. Of course, so has Molly Hatch Studio. That’s right, she has a few lives happening at once. No.1 commercial artist designing ceramics for companies like Anthropologie, The Land of Nod, Target … No.2 Fine artist creating huge, detailed, amazing installation work … No.3 Mother to a sweet six year old girl. I’m not sure when she sleeps, but she claims she does. You can listen right up there under Molly installing one of her ‘plates as paintings’ pieces,  or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First up, a few of her pieces that you might recognize {and that Mick might like, since they’re blue!}

Ahh, the teacup mug. And that vase… I need that vase!

Next, stepping back a tiny bit, these were a few of the pieces in her show at The Clay Studio in Philadelphia a year after completing her MFA {2010}:

Ah, yes… back where it all began!

So during that time there was a lot of hard work, and not a lot of money. I loved this story… not the poor part, but the hard work part… oh, and that very well-timed email she got from Anthropologie. She’s been working with them for years now, and here are a few of my recent faves:

Clearly, I’m going to need that unicorn mug. And the dachshund.

So, from functional pieces that can be found on shelves in lovely stores around the world, to breathtaking installation art that hangs in galleries and museums around the world. This is the piece she was talking about that is permanently installed in the lobby of the High Museum of Art in Atlanta:

Ooh, I would love to see that in person!

Now, If you happen to be in New York you could pop by Todd Merrill Studio, the gallery Molly’s been working with for the last few years. Here are just some of her insane fine art pieces:

 

Right?! Oh my word – so much talent in one person.

And finally, you’ll be happy to know that Molly’s no longer working in a flooded apartment basement {wearing rain boots with her supplies in tubs}, now she works HERE:

What the wha! Gorgeous and so well-deserved. Here’s to being an “opportunistic optimist”, and saying yes to all of the amazing things that come along with that outlook. Thank you so much to Molly for sharing her story – the good, the bad, the hustle, all of it. Thank you as always to Saatchi Art for supporting this episode, and thank YOU for listening. There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Molly Hatch Instagram / Molly Hatch Studio Instagram
  2. RISD
  3. Museum School, Boston
  4. Kathy King, Ceramics 
  5. Miranda Thomas, Pottery
  6. Michael Cardew / Ara Cardu
  7. Rebecca Louise Law episode
  8. University of Colorado 
  9. Betty Woodman
  10. Beth Lipman
  11. Bennington Art Museum
  12. Land of Nod, Molly’s collection
  13. Studio images via Molly’s home tour on Apartment Therapy

 





international women’s day

womensday

So many of my favorite artists in one spot, all working toward the same goal. Yep, in honor of International Women’s Day, Uprise Art and the artists featured {just a few shown here} are donating 100% of proceeds from this online exhibition, titled “For the Greater Good”, to Planned Parenthood. Brilliant, beautiful. #Resist

See all of the available originals in this show right here… 100% of proceeds!? Amazing.





crystal morey

crystalmorey

Fierce but fragile … beautiful, elegant, porcelain creatures by American artist Crystal Morey. Here are her words about why she creates what she creates:

“As a species, we sit at a pivotal moment, faced with monumental questions leading to difficult, uncertain answers. My figures exist on this frontier, absorbed in their own feelings of stress, anxiety and ambivalence. Sculpted from the silken white earth of porcelain, I see these delicate figures as containing power – as modern talismans and precious telling objects. They are here to remind us of our current trajectory and potential for destruction and downfall.” 

{Thanks to ceramicist Amanda Smith for pointing me to this lovely work}