medium /// ceramic




kaye blegvad

kayeblegvad

Elegant ladies and delicate hands ~ sigh ~ this is the lovely work of London-born, Brooklyn-based artist/illustrator Kaye Blegvad. I suddenly feel like burning some incense and doing yoga all afternoon… nude. Hm. Maybe not.





beccy ridsdel

beccyridsdel

Dissected ceramics, peeled back layers, and roses ‘n baby animals as far as the eye can see… oh yeah, I’m in! This is the work of UK based artist Beccy Ridsdel. This series is under the title of “art/craft” in her portfolio, which I find quite interesting. There’s something about the whole art vs. craft thing that totally intrigues me. Apparently it does the same for Beccy… here’s her description of this work:

“The installation takes the form of an observation of a surgical experiment in progress. The ‘surgeon’ is dissecting the craft object to see what is within. He finds craft through and through. He tries the experiment again and again, piling up the dissected work, hoping to see something different but it is always the same.”

{via Colossal}





eleonor boström

eleonorbostrom

Really, what more could you want? Gardening, a spot of tea, or a bit of stitching… these crazy dogs have you totally covered. Gah! I love them so much. This is the ceramic work of Eleonor Boström, a Swedish artist who splits her time between Stockholm and San Francisco. I wrote about her weird ‘n wonderful hounds three years ago… clearly I had to do it again! ps. I don’t sew, but I do need that second to last thread dog. NEED.





ron geibel

rongeibel

“Lick”, a ceramic series by Texas based artist Ron Geibel. I assume you’re not actually allowed to lick any of these dotty desserts, but I’m tempted… they look creamy and delicious from where I’m standing! Happy Friday.





“drawing with porcelain”

katharine_morling1

Oh my goodness, I am in love with everything this woman makes. I am so excited to finally be talking to London based artist Katharine Morling. Her work looks like wonky black & white drawings… that happen to be made of porcelain! I had so many questions about her narratives, her process, and of course her story. Where did the idea for these beauties come from?! You can listen right up there under that lovely “pot of pencils”, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

Let’s get started with “Nature Boy”, shall we? He started in this little box, which led to all of the work below him {and there’s even more on her site!}:

katharine_morling2

Porcelain cameras?! A butterfly net?! No, no, no… it’s all just too good.

This is the piece Katharine was talking about when she said she’s still not quite sure what it’s actually about! This is “Shifting Diamonds”:

katharine_morling3

Gorgeous. Up next, the sewing basket she got at a very exciting Tupperware party when she was a kid, along with her mother’s sewing machine:

katharine_morling4

I mean, come on! I want need a pair of those scissors.

This next piece is “Equipped”. Note the crosses she mentioned in a few of these beautiful household utensils:

katharine_morling5

Lovely. That whisk might be my favorite.

Ah, her typewriter! I have loved this piece, titled “Poison Pen”, for ages but boy oh boy it certainly has new meaning after finding out that Katharine has severe dyslexia:

katharine_morling6

… hence the wonky, confusing state of this lovely, porcelain machine.

I loved hearing about her process too! From sketching, to clay, to the fine line work {and I had to include a photo of Katharine so you could see the gorgeous woman behind that lovely English accent}:

katharine_morling7

Ah yes, nothing like a little peek behind the curtain!

And finally, a gem from the ‘speed round’. Katharine’s first job, when she was 13, was at a tiny little green grocer’s. This was their cash register, and it inspired a piece titled “Plenty”:

katharine_morling8

Her whimsical detail is just so insanely amazing! Look at that little box of matches… and those pencils… and allll of those coins! Sigh. Too good. And with that, I’ll say thanks to Katharine {and Rosie!} for spending an hour with me, big thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting episode 60 {!?}, and as always GIANT thanks to you for listening each week. There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other Links:

  1. Cockpit Arts, London
  2. Royal College of Art, London
  3. She is represented by Long & Ryle Gallery, London
  4. Louisa Taylor
  5. A few of the studio shots are from this New York Times article
  6. Some of Katharine’s smaller works are available in her shop

 





tjc & nod : fall 2016

nodfall2016

Gah! I could not be more thrilled with this gorgeous group of work. This is the Fall/Winter 2016 Wall Art Collection that I curated for The Land of Nod. From fall leaves to icy bergs… oh my goodness… so much goodness! There are ten very talented artists who created work for this project and I’m smitten with all of them. As always with my Nod collection, I aim to include art that will be amazing in nurseries and kids’ rooms, but I also want to make sure those pieces could hang in any room of the house {when your sweet babies get older and want Taylor Swift posters on their walls instead… it will happen.} Thanks to all of these amazing artists for creating such beautiful/fun work … love ya, mean it.

{The entire TJC collection from the past few seasons is available here}

Artists: 1. Martha Rich  2. Elise Morris  3. Agata Krolak  4. Liora Saad  5. Claire Softley  6. Lisa Golightly  7. Jay Dart  8. Mary Kate McDevitt  9. Cassie Marie Edwards  10 &11. Christine Lantz




amy santoferraro

amysantoferraro

I have written about American artist Amy Santoferraro a few times over the last few years… and here we are again! This is Amy’s found object series, titled “BB Baskets”. I love the objects themselves – juicy little jewels in forgotten ceramic baskets – but when I read how these beauties came to be, well I just had to share:

“My home is across a valley from Fort Riley, Kansas. The Kansas landscape mimics that of Afghanistan and Iraq in color and flatness, making it an ideal training ground for soldiers at the Army base before they head off to war. Everyday I hear and feel the rounds of firing and bombing practice while watching the neighborhood kids shoot each other with BB guns in the convenient overgrown bush hides of my yard. It is quite possibly the most surreal thing I have ever repeatedly experienced.

I started collecting the BBs the kids left in the yard without any clear direction other than picking up and collecting the beautiful balls of color. The collection grew as the days passed, and I gradually began seeing them as material. I love that they can be so many things and don’t readily volunteer their origin story. It’s not essential to appreciate the resulting object and in no way is a statement about war or only a personal narrative.

Sometimes the balls are just balls. But they are also bubbles, fruit, wishes, vomit, bubbling crud, excuses. . . pretty much anything that can build up to be overwhelming, disgusting and/or beautiful. The found baskets in this series fulfill my need to collect evidence of ceramics doing what it does best: masquerading as other objects and materials. One thing mimicking another due to nostalgia or sentiment rather than function or design, or skeuomorphism, is a huge part of my work and practice. I like to think of it as “materials behaving badly.” The materials or objects at home depot, the thrift store, or in my studio are kinda like Girls Gone Wild: they reveal too much, are too fake and are too cheap.”

So. Good.





laura berger

lauraberger_painting

Chicago based artist Laura Berger… so good, right? Well look what she’s doing now… YES! It’s as though her paintings have popped right off the canvas and onto the tabletop. Ceramic versions of her lovely little people:

lauraberger_ceramics

Love.





#5womenartists

A project for today! Listen to this…

The National Museum of Women in the Arts (NWMA), the world’s only major museum solely dedicated to celebrating great women artists, has announced a new social media campaign for this March’s Women’s History Month. If you ask someone to name five artists, they will likely name prominent male artists, but how many people can list five women artists? To increase awareness the museum will launch the campaign “Can you name five women artists?” March 1 on its website and blog as well as on social media outlets, including Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Using the hashtag #5womenartists, the campaign will encourage NMWA’s online community to help address the gender imbalance in the presentation of art both in the United States and internationally.

Oh, I am so in… mind you, I could name 500 women artists that I love, but I’ll play by the rules. Here are 5 of my {many} favorite artists, who also happen to be women:

5women_kilgallen
5women_donovan
5women_rich
5women_smith
5women_anne
5women_MAIER

Alright yes, that was 6, but I had to make sure that the mysterious and talented Vivian Maier was in there too! Ok, now it’s your turn – jump on those social media channels and name #5womenartists whose work you love {contemporary or historical} and help make it really easy for people to be able to name five women artists ♥

{click on the artwork above to see more of their work}





lana filippone

lanafilippone

Beautiful. This piece {and all of those gorgeous close-ups} is part of a series, by Canadian artist Lana Filippone, titled “Recursions. Crystallize”. Here are Lana’s words about her work, and the materials she chooses to create these beautiful worlds with:

[Lana] strives to access a language that allows magic to exist in our everyday lives, whether in her sculptural or functional work. This language harkens back to places that are familiar yet subversive of her material. Humorous nostalgia becoming light physical daydreams in clay, manifest from big ideas. She approaches themes of transience in shared human-experience; ephemeral states solidified in porcelain, ideas about forbearance and a gentle nod to the human Truths, mostly Impermanence. Her material once liquid, is symbolically transformed then crystallized in time.

Photographs by Jonathan Sippel Photography