medium /// contemporary




yuliya

YULIYA

Sigh. Sometimes, especially on Friday after a very long and busy week, I love to look at art like this. Ah, the soothing palette and of course the promise of scones, lattes, and general quiet for two whole days… enter the lovely work of Ontario based artist Yuliya. Yes, this is exactly what I need today.

{Prints of her work are available on Society6}





jean faucheur

jean-faucheur

Dizzying collages, with an absolutely dreamy palette, by French artist Jean Faucheur. Um, does anyone know where I can get scissors to cut perfect circles? Thanks.





albert ruiz villar

AlbertRuizVillar

I wrote about Spanish artist Albert Ruiz Villar, just over two years ago… his work has evolved from looser compositions into these lovely mixed media “structures”. I kind of wish I could walk around in them, from “room” to colorful “room”.

{His work is available on Saatchi Art}





annie vought

annievought

Whoa. PAPER. Paper that has been really, really, really cut. A lot. My hand is cramping just looking at these insane pieces by California based artist Annie Vought. That white dome of triangles? That arc of text bleeding off the edge of a black page? And are those tiny little houses in that pattern-only piece? Yep, I said it once, and I’ll say it again… whoa.

{Thanks to yesterday’s artist, Annie O’Dorisio, for sending me a link to Annie Vought’s work… so many talented Annies in one week!}





annie o’dorisio

annie-odorisio

Pen & ink, and wool on heavy paper. LOVE. This is the playful, geometric mixed media work of American artist Annie O’Dorisio. Simple, yet complex, and such a perfect combination of materials:

“I lay down a shape in pencil, working with it until it is true to the image I have in mind. The shapes and patterns end up being quite masculine. The wool serves as not only a way to add sculptural dimension but as a vehicle of warmth. Through this method I have created a language between the two mediums that is formal yet natural.”

Sigh. A lovely way to start a Monday.





anna maria bellmann

anna-bellmann

Oh my. Delicate, floral, paper-cuts by German artist Anna Maria Bellmann. These gorgeous pieces were a lovely surprise when I went to look at her portfolio. I actually found her on Pinterest because of these blue beauties:

anna-bellmann_blue

… also delicate and floral, but not paper-cuts! These are called cyanotypes. Here’s the deal, in Anna’s words:

The cyanotype is an old precious printing method, also called Prussian blue print. 1842 discovered by Sir John Herschel, one of the greatest scientists of his time, it was initially used predominantly, to blueprints – create – technical drawings for architectural, engineering or shipbuilding. The cyanotype uses the light sensitivity of certain iron salts that form insoluble crystals under UV irradiation. Is exposed in the sunshine, developed with running water, the result is the beautiful color tone, the “Prussian blue”. Photograms of this kind allow a very fine representation of floral structures – as a symbiosis a gift from the sun, blue sky and botanical beauties.

Ah, so, so lovely… all of it!

{Blue pieces found via Lisa Congdon on Pinterest}





susan ashworth

SusanAshworth

Sigh. It’s still life oil paintings like these that make me want to sign up for “Still Life Painting 101″. This is the work of UK based painter Susan Ashworth. Such a beautiful celebration of the mundane, and don’t even get me started on her stunning use of light… those dark rooms? Shafts of sunlight cascading in on those simple jars of flowers? LOVE!





jessica slater

jessicaslater

Oil and spray paint on canvas, inspired by a series of annual trips to India, Sri Lanka, Cambodia and Vietnam… gorgeous! Explosions of color, rich textures, and suggestions of nature brought beautifully together by UK based painter Jessica Slater. Love. {These range in size from 12″x16″ up to 24″x36″} 

{available on Saatchi Art}





oliver hickmet

OLIVER_HICKMET

Dramatic landscapes, and exposed pink stretchers? Um, yes… love. I found these pieces, by London based artist Oliver Hickmet on Artfetch… their description of this series fills in all of the blanks:

“Our sense of the world’s sublime, great natural beauty spots are often overlaid with our expectations, fed by slick travel photography and tourist guides, reduced to the size of a postcard, or the screen of a smartphone. As consumers of marketed and packaged tourist experiences how do we find the kernels of truth hidden within? Oliver Hickmet began with researching and exploring these questions while on residency in rural Piedmont, Italy, and the result is a series of pieces that form his understanding of where reality lies within the making, creating and consumption of these tourism fantasies of a place. Beginning with the saturated colour images from postcards of the Dolomite Mountains he scans them overlaid with actual soil from the local countryside and prints the results onto supple silk. Draped across candy-floss pink stretchers these art objects are somewhere between the real and the imaginary, a unique plane that exists for digital era tourists.” ~ Artfetch

So interesting, and gorgeous… I think I need one of these.





lotte maja bjerre

lottemajabjerre

Piles of geometric up-dos? Perfectly stacked, shiny french braids? I’m not sure, but that’s what I see! I do know that these perfectly wrapped parcels of whatever they are were created with only pencil, and pen, on paper {up to 2’x3′} Love! This is the most recent work of Copenhagen based artist/illustrator Lotte Maja Bjerre… and now I want someone to french braid my hair. In a square.