medium /// contemporary




mark wagner

Who needs regular old art supplies when you can just cut up money to make your collages! Yep, American artist Mark Wagner has been slicing and dicing American currency for years. My favorite series is titled “Washington at Large”. Why? Well according to Mark, “It’s only natural that Washington’s “Head of State” should grow a body and start walking around and doing stuff.” I absolutely agree. Also, I really love that George is out there mowing all that green {see what I did there?}. Here is more about Mark and his reasons for cutting up thousands of dollars every year:

Mark Wagner is best known for his intricate collages made entirely from deconstructed US dollars. Wagner destroys thousands of bills yearly to create works which pointedly and playfully explore the intersection of wealth, power, value, and American identity. Wagner’s audacious (and unlawful) destruction of this revered icon of American commerce is checked only by his virtuoso material manipulation, which renders what you will… portraits, plant life, fantastical beasts, or allegorical scenes recasting George Washington in every roll.

Wagner’s artwork is an entry point to a conversation extending far beyond the art world. Decades dedicated to destroying banknotes has provided Wagner with a unique perspective on the nature of money. Modern man’s obsession with finance and our wistful attempts to tame it through economics belies money’s emotional, mercurial… even fictional nature. Wagner addresses these issues in writing, lecture, and interview as eloquently as he does through his artwork.





joe suzuki

Haring, Warhol, Basquiat … and a whole bunch of colorful poured paint! These paint sculptures {is that a thing?} are the fantastic work of Japanese-American, California based artist Joe Suzuki. Funny, smart, and a modern ode to Pop Art that makes me smile {like a hot pink smiley face}. Here is Joe’s statement:

I consider my work to be artifacts of my own particular culture, which is not the generalized Japanese American culture, but that which formed as a direct result of being a first generation immigrant. Through a long assimilation process, I found myself not fully belonging to either culture, but rather somewhere in between, which I began to call Japamerica.

In my peculiar culture, customs and traditions are born out of misunderstandings or idiosyncrasies, and myths and legends are often formed through the struggles of everyday life. I am fascinated by and curious about my culture’s development and the affect it has on my identity. I see my art making as an investigation that captures and documents my ever changing, mutating, polyglot reality. My work is informed by my life, contingent on my ordinary, real world experiences as a middle class Japamerican dad, who is simply trying to make sense of it all.

{via Artsy}





do ho suh

Gasp! “Home Within A Home” is the work of Korean artist Do Ho Suh. This insane polyester fabric and metal frame house is an installation from 2013, and was shown at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Seoul. Can you imagine wandering around inside that blue beauty? Breathtaking. Oh… and if you’re going to have a home like that, some of his other work will be, um, a necessity:

So. Good.





heidi leitzke

Oh! Magical, Dr.Suess-ish wonderlands… enter the world of  American artist Heidi Leitzke. These pieces are from her “thread paintings” series. Her color choices are beautiful and her imagination is clearly top notch! Now, how do I go to there on this fine Monday morning?





antoinette ferwerda

Gasp! I’d love to wander around in these pastel-hued, magical, and very hilly wonderlands from morning till night! These mixed media pieces are the work of Australian artist Antoinette Ferwerda. This is what she does…

“… [Antoinette] explores the use of colour to evoke emotion.  Patterns in nature are still her fascination.  Her design stories and themes encourage a personal, thought-provoking connection with her art.  Her compositions reflect light, capture the geometry of shape and make Australian landscapes playful and abstract.” 

Beautiful.





chambers austelle

Weird portraits. Yep, always a favorite of mine! This is the latest body of work by American artist Chambers Austelle. I wrote about an older series of hers … also weird portraits… when one of them appeared on the cover of Fresh Paint Magazine {now Create Magazine}. I loved those weirdo women, and I love these ladies too!





françoise joris


She had me at ‘porcelain pineapple’. French ceramicist Françoise Joris makes delicate, fantastical objects that are clearly inspired by nature… and fruit (of her imagination AND pineapples) :

“My approach is free and detached from contingencies; It is the fruit of my imagination. 

The completion of a piece gives birth to the design of the next creating a network of invisible but strong links, which continuously fuels my artistic approach and guides my explorations.

So much remains to be said and done with porcelain, a primary and yet so noble material.”

Lovely.





clare elsaesser

When I started The Jealous Curator way back in 2009, I’m pretty sure I wrote about California based painter Clare Elsaesser every ten minutes or so. Well, just for fun I swooped past her site today, and look what I found! Her work has always been lovely, but she’s managed to evolve her work into something even lovelier! Sigh…. and now I want to dance in a meadow with those dreamy, washy women.

{All of Claire’s work, both originals and prints, can be found in her online shop.}





marie conigliaro

Well, this gives “nature-inspired” a whole new meaning! These weird and whimsical pieces are the hand-cut collages of Denver based artist Marie Conigliaro. They’re from her latest series, titled very appropriately, “Anatomical”. Wouldn’t it be amazing if that’s what was actually going on in there… well, minus the cactus. Ouch.

{Check out her shop. Marie’s prints are insanely inexpensive… so much so that I feel the need to tell her to put her prices WAY up, but I’ll mind my own business. Kinda.}





eleni pratsi

Oh my circles! Colors bleeding into each other while contained in perfect circles. This is the work of Paris based painter Eleni Pratsi. I love her work – oil and acrylic on canvas – and I love her reasons for obsessing over circles just as much:

“… Beyond doubt, the circle plays a favourable role in my paintings. Treating the circular form as if it were the unique letter of my plastic alphabet is based on a personal choice and backed up by a childhood memory: when asked by my instructor, at the age of eleven, as I took my first art lesson to draw a circle, this turned out to be perfect, to Eliza’s taste. Consciously or unconsciously I recall her overflowing enthusiasm but also my feeling so proud for having traced a circle, my first circle, a perfect circle. With this childhood experience recorded undoubtedly in my subconscious, ten years later I initiated a series of artistic studies through which I’ve been pursuing, ever since, the perfect circle.”

Mission accomplished. Happy Friday.

{via Saatchi Art}