medium /// contemporary




hayv kahraman

hayvkahraman

Gorgeous. This is the work of Baghdad-born, San Francisco-based artist Hayv Kahramana. All of these oil on panel pieces are from her 2013 series, Extimacy. I love this quote she gave in a New York Times article about this work:

“Having these women violently detaching their limbs, for me, is very reminiscent of the psyche of a refugee, and that sense of detachment you have from your land that you’ve had to leave behind. That’s the idea of the diasporic women, who are fragmented, or cyborgs almost. They’ve had to give up part of themselves.”

Brilliant, and beautiful.





robert otto epstein

robertottoepstein

Portraits that pop right off the paper they’re painted on! These candy-hued ladies are the work of New York based artist Robert Otto Epstein {who by the way has a degree in political science, and oh yes, also a law degree… hm, I feel like there’s a story there}. This is his latest figurative series… they make me want to call all of my girlfriends so we can wear our watermelon shirts, drink cosmopolitans and argue over who gets to be Carrie / who has to be Miranda?





“take your pleasure seriously”

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So, I’m sitting here trying to think of a way to explain what India born, Sydney based paper artist Gunjan Aylawadi does… but in all honesty I really have no idea how she does what she does. Let’s just say there is a lot of paper, woven to look like intricate/patterned tapestries. Yes. She makes paper do this?! But don’t worry, she’s going to tell us how. Listen right up there under that insane “work in progress”, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First up, this is the original she recently sent to me. Mind. Blown…

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Yeah, that’s in my house!? The photographs are fantastic, but I wish I could explain what it looks like in person. So, so, so good.

We talked about her love of geometry {perhaps a holdover from her computer science degree… computer science?!}, and I thought this piece, and the making of this piece, was a beautiful example to show how these perfect geometrics come to life:

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Cra. Zy. Have I mentioned yet that she’s completely self-taught, and in fact, invented this technique? Yes. She did. Again, my mind is blown. And while we’re on that topic, I’ll show you this beauty:

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It’s paper. I dunno. What I find even funnier, is that Gunjan claims she’s “not a very patient person”… UM, what!? She told me that in day-to-day life she is very impatient, but once she found this work, and while she’s immersed in it she becomes another person. She said it feels like someone else takes over, almost like a form of meditation. Here she is in action working on two HUGE “carpet” pieces:

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Yeah. Not very patient. Right.

And now, on to the text pieces we were talking about… love it!

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As if her technique isn’t brilliant enough, Gunjan’s reason for doing these text pieces just adds to the awesome-ness of this work. Such a smarty-pants.

Now, as usual, the speed round produced a few gems. Turns out she refuses to eat Vegemite, but claims to be a huge fan of anything dairy. Well, according to her Instagram feed, she wasn’t kidding:

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Yep! Ice cream from around the world! Paris, Sydney, and Japan {and there are a lot more where these came from!}. If I make it to Sydney next year, I’m so making her take me to wherever that blue ice cream came from! Oh, another speed round tidbit – she would love to show her very analog work in Silicon Valley, so if you’re listening Facebook, Twitter, Google etc… CALL HER.

Ok, thanks so much to Gunjan for sharing her insanely inspiring story with us, thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting the episode, and thanks to you for listening! There will be more art for your ear next weekend. xo

Other links:

  1. Elizabeth Gilbert TED Talk
  2. Japanese Paper Place, Toronto
  3. Broken Hill, Australia
  4. Munga Park, Australia

 





haruka misawa

HarukaMisawa

Oh, yes. Amazing flowers inspired by pencil shavings… but Japanese designer/artist Haruka Misawa went one step further than just being inspired by the pretty petals made by her pencil sharpener. She printed paper with pattern, wound that paper into tight cylindrical scrolls, and then put her sharpener to work… the result… her own unique, one-of-a-kind blossoms. Happy. Friday. Mic drop.

{via Colossal}





nicola kloosterman

nicola_kloosterman

Yes, yes, yes. Strange compositions, beautifully cut found images… it’s work like this that makes me want to drop everything and run to my studio. This is the weird & wonderful work of Netherlands based collage artist Nicola Kloosterman. Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to go and cut up some magazines. Immediately.





pedro correa

pedrocorrea

Oh. All of these beautifully composed photographs are from a series titled, quite appropriately, “Home of Art”. YES, I love homes of art! This is the work of Pedro Correa, a Spanish fine art photographer based in Brussels. Here are his words about this series:

Home of Art: A personal view on the very special atmosphere that reigns in museums and that allows art to live and blossom, its “guardians of art” and in general the way art is presented and approached.

So good. I obviously love wandering through galleries, so these images were calling to me for that reason, but, what captivates me about his entire portfolio … Pedro’s unique view of the world. What. An. Eye.





mie yim

mieyim

Just to be clear, I hate deviled eggs. As in, HATE… until I saw this beautiful little morsel. This is the work of South Korean born, New York based Mie Yim. Tiny food drawn in pastel on Martha Stewart paint chips! LOVE. She has a delicious Instagram feed full of these yummy little things, and it was actually kind of hard not to post all of them. Yep, anyone that can make me like the look of a deviled egg is clearly very talented.

{Thanks to Jeanne Heifetz for sending me the link to Mie’s tiny work}





mike ryczek

mike_ryczek

Quiet, beautiful, mundane, everyday-ness… that makes my heart skip a beat. This is the work {oil on masonite} of American painter Mike Ryczek. Sigh. Perfect for a Monday.





“a giant game of telephone… with art”

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In late 2012, I got an email from an American singer/songwriter named Sally Taylor. She was beginning to plan what she described as “a giant game of telephone, but with art”, and could I suggest a few visual artists that might be able to create something based on a piece of music she’d send them… um, YES! It sounded fun, creative, and amazing… and it was! In 2014 Consenses opened to the public in Martha’s Vineyard, and today I get to ask Sally the ins and outs of this giant project. You can listen right up there under lovely Sally, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First things first, we quickly have to talk about her parents, because:

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Yep, Sally is the daughter of American music icons, Carly Simon and James Taylor. For real. As you can imagine, I had a few questions about that too! She obviously comes from an insanely creative family {her brother Ben is a musician too} which I’m sure fueled this big beautiful project. Speaking of which, here’s a peek behind the doors at Consenses. I wish I’d been there for the opening, but my hope is to be there for the closing this coming August {if you’re anywhere near Martha’s Vineyard you should go!}:

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Ahhh, so much goodness in one spot! So basically the way it works – there are “chains” of creativity. So a musician writes a piece of music, and an artist would make a painting based on that song. Next, a dancer would create choreography inspired by the visual art. A perfumer could respond to that dance, developing a perfume that would tell the same story, but through scent. This is not one of the official “chains” but it’s a selection of work from Consenses that I LOVE:

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Amazing. {Did you see Lisa Golightly and Susanna Bauer in there?!} Each chain was then housed in a customized set designed by, you guessed it, a set designer. Seriously, just the coolest project ever. So, what do you do after you create such a cool project? A TEDx Talk, obviously:

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This is such a great talk… and she looks fabulous to boot! Apparently she only got two lunges into her backstage “get the nerves out workout”, but you’d never be able to tell. She did a wonderful job. Watch here.

Now, I don’t know about you, but I’ve never sung backup vocals on Letterman for my Dad, or hung out with Oprah and Stephen Colbert with my mom… but Sally has:

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Crazy cool! I loved her story about being on Letterman and her “Jolly Green Giant” outfit! Thank you so much to Sally for generously sharing her funny, insightful stories; thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting yet another episode; and big thanks to you for listening! There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

ps. I cannot believe I’m willingly posting these, but just so you don’t think my description was off… here’s proof. Me. Age 11. Mistaken for a boy. A lot. *note the white California glasses and yellow terry cloth shorts. Yowza:

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Other links:

  1. Consenses Documentary
  2. Mass MOCA 
  3. Consenses School Project
  4. Oprah clip
  5. Letterman clip

 





naomi okubo

naomi_okubo

Sigh. This is the stunning work of Tokyo based artist Naomi Okubo. I wrote about her a little over two years ago and as you can see by these paintings, I had to write again. These are self-portraits… in plural. Yes, that’s Naomi at her own art show in the two top pieces, titled “THIS IS NOT MY LIFE #1” & “THIS IS NOT MY LIFE #2”. Here is her latest artist statement:

“… The ideas for my work come from an inferiority complex and my experiences in adolescence. As an adolescent, everyone starts to care about how other people think of their appearances. In my personal experiences, when I changed my own image, people changed their attitude toward me. They started to concern me, and our relationship became better. I also realized the power of fashion and the fear of other’s watchful eyes. I have been interested in appearances ever since … Although it seems like a personal issue, it is connected to greater problems and inconsistencies in society.”

Thanks to Period – Art by Women for bringing my attention back to Naomi’s work. Love!