medium /// contemporary




cory peeke

corypeeke

Ok, I can’t decide if I want to spend all day cutting up old catalogues, or if I should use that time to redecorate my house ’60s-style! This is the work of American artist Cory Peeke. Not only do I love these beautifully composed collages, I also super crazy love this statement:

“I stick stuff to other stuff and kid myself about the rest.” ~ Cory Peeke

YES. Hilarious and amazing. Ok. Time to pick a dust ruffle for the bed.

{discovered via Kolaj Magazine}





mariko kusumoto

marikokusumoto

Gasp! Sculpture? Fabric? Yes and yes… but also… jewelry! What!? This is the delicate, whimsical, gorgeous work of Japanese-born, US-based artist Mariko Kusumoto. Brooches, bracelets, and necklaces that look like they were found in a mermaid’s jewelry box… I already gasped, right?





mya kerner

myakerner

Ahh, quiet blue vistas. This is the elegant work of Seattle based artist Mya Kerner. Not only are these oil paintings poetic, but so are her words about this work:

“When I look out into the landscape, I see scratched lines breaking through the slopes, while flecks of white dapple on eroded surfaces, recalling their winter dress, recalling cooler seasons.” ~ Mya Kerner

Sigh. Now I need mittens and a hot chocolate with whipped cream. Happy Monday.





“a passion for process”

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Sigh. That’s the sound I make every time I look at the work of American artist Kristen Martincic. Refreshing water, lovely pools, paper swimsuits… yeah, paper swimsuits that Kristen sews. SEWS! Sigh. Ok, let’s get on with all of this gorgeousness. You can listen right up there under that deep blue pool, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

These were the first pieces of Kristen’s that I found a few years ago, so naturally we started there:

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Gah! “Traditional print media and a hybrid of print, drawing and painting on panel” … don’t you want to jump in there? Me too! Well, safety first… paper flotation devices for everyone:

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Yep. Sewn and stuffed paper floaties and life vests. Seriously, just too good. Oh and of course, you’re going to need a swimsuit too. Brace yourself. These are gorgeous:

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Japanese paper, with a perfect touch of printed ink, sewn into delicate suits. Ok, I have to do it again… sigh.

Kristen is a new mom so she hasn’t been in the studio much these days. When she can get in there though it looks a bit like this:

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If she “can just punch some circles” she considers it a successful day in the studio! Hilarious and so true when there’s a baby hanging out with you.

In the not-so-speedy speed round I had to ask her about diving boards, mainly so I’d have an excuse to show a few more of her pools … complete with diving boards:

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Love. And finally, a few shots of Kristen’s gorgeous studio and her sweet baby boy who’s there to help his mama:

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He looks like a natural artist to me… either that or a construction worker because he really wants in on that hammer! Thanks so much to Kristen for doing this with me even though she hasn’t slept much in the last 8 months; thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting this obsession of mine; thanks to audible.com for making my new book into an audio book – it’s officially available now – and thank YOU so much for listening ! There will be more art for your ear next weekend {and it’s going to be an interesting one… recorded at an event in Portland with Lisa Congdon!}

Other links:

  1. Japanese Paper Place
  2. Kate Bingaman-Burt

 





ashley longshore

ashleylongshore

Abe. For GUCCI. Seriously, I could not love these more! I’m not sure if I could rock those diamond encrusted rose-colored glasses, but Jesus is doing a fabulous job… not to mention Mark Twain and his fashion-forward flowered jacket. This is the crazy, hilarious, and insanely colorful work of New Orleans based artist Ashley Longshore. Here are Ashley’s words about her work:

“My paintings are representative of the world I see around me. I am inspired by pop culture and things that I find intriguing.I really like to combine the use of words and images in an unexpected way to create a smart, colorful bold statement.Most importantly my love of color is what really makes my artwork “pop”. My paintings are statement pieces that are a reflection of the experiences I have in my life.”

Clearly, I need to experience some of Ashley’s life! Mardi Gras, anyone? ps. Keep your eyes open for the first issue of Create Magazine… one of these fellas is on the cover!





the polygon project

polygonproject

I could not be more proud to have one of my pieces in this beautiful show {that’s my terrarium collage at the bottom of the images, titled “with each spritz, loralee was only enabling mike’s unhealthy obsession with the recent terrarium craze”}. These are just some of the pieces that are part of The Polygon Project, a fabulous exhibition for a wonderful cause, curated by Tasmania based artist/curator Laura E. Kennedy. Not only do I have a polygon in there, but so do two women I’ve interviewed on the podcast… did you see them up there? Catherine Graffam and Amanda Brazier are part of this lovely project too! Here’s what it’s all about:

“This exhibition features over 30 incredible female artists carefully selected from all over the planet by curator Laura E. Kennedy. Each was provided with an identical “logo” shaped panel to work on and the proceeds from sales go to the wonderful Anti-Domestic Violence Charity – White Ribbon.”

See? Beyond proud to be involved with a group of women helping women! The show will be up at the Salamanca Arts Centre in Hobart Tasmania until November 13th. Not in Tasmania? No problem… all of this work is available to purchase online, but hurry, because half of the work is already SOLD.





scott albrecht

scottalbrecht_work

Oh my … they’re like artsy word puzzles for your eyes! Can you read them? All of these messages – some on paper, others made with wood – are the latest work from Brooklyn based artist Scott Albrecht. If you happen to be in LA you can see this work in an upcoming show, titled New Translations. It opens on November 19th at Subliminal Projects in Los Angeles and runs until January 7, 2017. RSVP for the November 19th opening reception right here.

ps. I had to share this little sneak peek into Scott’s process:

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kurt pio

kurtpio

Giant diamonds and huge bottles of champagne? Yes, that’s how you do Monday! These are a few of the pieces included in a new show, titled “Stone Sober” featuring the work of South African artist Kurt Pio. This is Kurt’s first solo show in the US so I’m pretty sure he’s opening a bottle of bubbly or two! Here are a few words from the gallery:

Gallery Orange {819 Royal Street New Orleans} is proud to present Capetown artist Kurt Pio’s debut solo show in the US. Kurt’s work has been shown for years by leading edge designers and in such global magazines as Conde Nast and Elle Decoration … Gallery Orange feels a solo show is due, so we are pairing Kurt’s two bodies of work, the established gem collection and the newer champagne collection, in a one stunning show titled “Stone Sober”.

The show opens this Saturday, November 12 through November 22, 2016. An opening reception will be held on November 12th from 6:00- 9:00pm. RSVP @ info@gallery-orange.com





“experiments, risks… and dryer lint”

tonya_corkey1

I’ve talked to artists who work with hand-made paint, fresh flowers, tiny glass tiles, and delicate paper… but today is a new one. Lint – aka dryer fluff. Yes, Canadian artist Tonya Corkey creates these gorgeous pieces using lint from the laundry room! I wrote about her years ago {the second I found her work obviously}, and now thanks to the wonders of podcasts, I was able to ask all of my lint-related questions. You can listen right up there, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

Before we really get going, just so you believe me, look at this close-up of that first piece above:

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Lint!!! Mind. Blown. Ok, moving on. This next piece is the colorful portrait that Tonya was talking about:

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Just imagine collecting and organizing that much colorful lint? It makes me want to wash a bunch of red socks so I can send her a ball of pinky/red fluff! Now, not that I want Tonya to ever feel terrified, but I kinda love that this piece scared her so much. See, brilliant artists are humans too.

Ok, so here are some of her portraits. The first guy below, Freddie, was the first lint portrait she ever did, and is titled “Your Friend Freddie”. This piece is 5’x3.5′ and took months for Tonya to finish… which doesn’t surprise me at all:

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She quickly embraced negative space which saved a lot of time… and lint.

Oh, and these! These are the mirrored pieces we talked about. STUNNING:

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Right? Sigh. So gorgeous. Up next, the writing from the back of these nostalgic found photographs… some mirrored, some with a bit of a linty shadow:

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Again, gorgeous. Speaking of gorgeous, here is a shot of Tonya in her studio. I love seeing where/how artists work, and this photo is particularly great because you can see the scale of a few of the pieces from earlier in this post. Also, I love that she’s surrounded by bags full of dryer fluff:

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Lovely. Thank you so much to Tonya for taking the time to tell her stories, thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting episode 75; thanks to audible.com for making my new book into an audio book – it’s officially available now – and thank YOU so much for listening every week! There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Queen’s University
  2. Alison Milne Gallery
  3. OCAD
  4. Ben Skinner
  5. California College of the Arts

 





per fhager

perfhager

Yeah. That’s right… CROSS-STITCHED VIDEO GAMES! This is the meticulous work of Swedish artist Per Fhager. I had to include that image of Per in action so you’d believe that these are embroidered pieces, not screen-grabs. Insane. Here’s a bit more about why he does what he does:

Per´s choice of material, technique and color gives us a perfect example of how traditional crafts can receive a new expression and context in the modern world. The embroideries differs largely in texture, technique and color density, these differences are important in the process of producing the needle point works. The handmade pictures arrives from video game stills where composition, narrative and memory plays its role.

It really is kind of crazy how close a pixel is to a cross-stitch. Hm. And with that bit of amazingness, I will wish you a happy Friday. Mic drop.