medium /// drawing




“magical portals & secret painting parties”

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Oh, so many mysterious landscapes, strange little girls, and what I can only assume to be a lot of empty tubes of black paint! I’m talking to Vancouver based painter Rebecca Chaperon today, and as usual, I have lots of questions. Warning: We had some major technical difficulties getting this episode recorded, but we did it! There is the occasional wifi glitch, so just ignore those, ok? Thanks! You can listen right up there under Rebecca in her studio, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

Let’s start with the first series of Rebecca’s that I ever saw… “Like a Great Black Fire”:

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Gorgeous! And surprising to learn that she didn’t actually use that much black paint. Speaking of which, we talked about the dramatic swing she took with her color palette – from dark/moody to pastel/sweet. Her work still looked like her work, but the colors were flipped. Here’s a little visual evolution:

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Ahh! I love it all, but if you follow me, you’ll know that I have a soft spot for pink. That final piece – “Lady of the Pink Lake” – yeah, I am completely and totally in love with that! It’s a perfect blend of all of her work… ice, landscapes, portals, weird little girls. Love it.

Other things I love from Rebecca’s portfolio? These amazing crystals, ie. her “Tesseract” series:

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Oh my goodness… it’s like her flat portals have found a whole new candy-hued dimension! And onto more pastel gems from here. Rebecca’s mini iceberg series:

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I’ve loved these for years, but had no idea the lovely story behind them {hence the reason I’m addicted to doing this podcast!}. 

So, from paintings of icebergs and crystals to this beautiful/creepy book, titled “Eerie Dearies”

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Ha! So great! An A to Z book that gives you “26 Ways To Miss School”. Edward Gorey would be proud!

Oh, and I was very excited to find out more about this. Secret painting parties? YES!!!

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Crystals, moons, ladies and paint… sounds like a perfect evening to me. If you’re interested in finding out how to get yourself into one of these secret painting parties, click this secret link.

And finally, Rebecca’s black bob that I love oh so much:

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So chic … well, except for the spiders. Thank you so much to Rebecca for doing this – and bearing with me during our technical difficulties – thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting yet another episode, and big thanks to you for listening! There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other Links:

  1. Emily Carr University of Art & Design
  2. Opus Art Supplies
  3. Grunt Gallery
  4. Little Mountain Gallery
  5. Richmond Art Gallery
  6. Vancouver Art Gallery
  7. Dandelion Emporium
  8. Pecha Kucha (Vancouver) & Rebecca’s talk

 





alëna olasyuk

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Whoa. These are way beyond my level of patience. These are DRAWINGS. Chinese ink drawings from Beijing based, Ukrainian-born artist Alëna Olasyuk, and these are her words about her work:

Complexity and simplicity, chaos and balance, movement and tranquillity, transiency and infinity – these are the subjects that Alëna explores in her oeuvre. Her series of works reveal the visual and spiritual experiences of her life in China and her growing interest in philosophical ideas of Buddhism. The main idea behind her works is perhaps the idea of the world’s duality. Alëna’s works refer to the main binary oppositions in Chinese ancient classic – Yin and Yang.

Lovely… I’m feeling more at peace already.





marcus james

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Colored pencil on paper. Yes. Amazingly beautiful landscapes drawn by UK based artist Marcus James. The colors, the mark making… absolutely stunning. Oh, and just to add to that… the scale! I had to include those last two photos so you could see these pieces in all of their splendor. Ah, nature.





jeanne heifetz

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Intricate ink drawings on gorgeous dyed paper… all of these pieces are from a series, titled “There Is No Road” by American artist Jeanne Heifetz. I absolutely love her statement about this work:

“… As a child, I was always afraid of making the wrong decision. Selecting from many possible options was torture unless I could find a convincing rationale for my choice, some external justification beyond my own desire. Fear made me superstitious. I enlisted numerology, mythology, arcane patterns of all sorts to confirm the “rightness” of my decisions.

This body of work confronts decision-making head on. Still craving a system, I borrow one from nature: Plateau’s laws, which govern the branching and growth of many natural forms. Within that system, I improvise, lighting out for the territory without a map. Each drawing grows by slow accretion as I allow myself (or force myself) to make hundreds of tiny sequential decisions…”

So. Good. What a beautiful challenge to give herself… as are the results.





mie yim

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Just to be clear, I hate deviled eggs. As in, HATE… until I saw this beautiful little morsel. This is the work of South Korean born, New York based Mie Yim. Tiny food drawn in pastel on Martha Stewart paint chips! LOVE. She has a delicious Instagram feed full of these yummy little things, and it was actually kind of hard not to post all of them. Yep, anyone that can make me like the look of a deviled egg is clearly very talented.

{Thanks to Jeanne Heifetz for sending me the link to Mie’s tiny work}





aimee bee brooks

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Ah, I love a good zine! I’ve written about New York based artist/illustrator Aimee Bee Brooks before, but when I saw this sweet little zine, titled “Color Theory”, well… here we are! I think the blue page is my favorite… or green… or maybe orange. Sigh. Did I mention I started a club in the sixth grade called “The Rainbow Girls”. Yeah, I totally did.





charlotte keates

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I would happily live in one of these paintings… I’ll take one with a pool. This is the gorgeous work of London based artist Charlotte Keates. Her statement says it all, so I’ll let Charlotte take it from here:

“I am particularly interested in the dialogue between architecture and nature. Ever-inspired by the 1960’s and 70’s classical architectural interiors, I aim to create intriguing and surprisingly illusionary interiors. These spaces convey a sense of stillness, a peaceful and calm location of contemplation – a space to think. Particular experiences and observations forge the main architectural structures, angles and objects in my paintings, where I aim to portray the beauty achieved through geometric simplicity.

The outdoors spills through a window or door, location or setting. Pots and plants teeter on the edge of a table whilst trees grow convincingly from rooftops and pillars are cut off abruptly, hovering slightly above ground level. The interiors are minimally furnished with large glass open spaces, leaving it exposed to the vulnerability of the outside world that encroaches upon us. The landscape has no boundaries; we are unable to control and confine it, forcing the inside out and the outside in.”

Sigh. Lovely.

{ps. She has a show opening next Thursday, June 2, at Arusha Gallery in Edinburgh.}





ariane fairlie

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I often curse the internet for being a rabbit hole, but in this case it totally worked for me! So, when I interviewed Zoë Pawlak for the podcast this past weekend, she mentioned her trusty right-hand woman, her studio manager Ariane. Naturally I looked her up {it is the internet after all} and look what I found… color pencil on wood panel celebrating the coming of summer with these beautifully drawn swimsuits! LOVE. Yep, this is the work of Montreal based artist {and studio manager} Ariane Fairlie





“big mouths, ukuleles… but no chins”

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I’m starting to sound like a broken record… today I’m talking to an artist that I’ve loved for ages, have done several projects with, but you guessed it, we’ve never actually spoken. I was so excited to speak to New Hampshire based artist Aris Moore. She’s an amazing artist, a recent MFA grad, a full-time middle school art teacher, and a single mother with twins – phewf. I was so excited, in fact, that I forgot to hit record. Episode 49 and I forget to hit record? Sigh. Anyway, we made a full recovery and also became BFFs in the process. You can listen right up there under the lovely lady in the red blouse, or you can subscribe on iTunes. Now, I always like to start these posts with a few of my favorites. Aris’ sad/beautiful portraits are on that list:

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I love them. So strange. So beautiful, and yes… not a chin in sight. Next, this is some of her older work. These were the pieces I discovered and wrote about way back in 2009. And that bunny block at the top? Yes, that’s the original piece she sent to me, again, in late 2009. It was a major highlight in the first year of being ‘the jealous curator’:

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That bag full of little people is heartbreaking, and I can’t help feeling that it’s my fault. Someone left a very harsh comment on one of my posts about Aris’ work back then, and it really hurt her… to the point where she just wanted to gather up all of her little characters, throw them in a bag, and toss them out. See? Heartbreaking. Well, she didn’t throw them out, but she definitely evolved them. Yet another reason to admire this fabulous artist {because, remember from last week’s episode… “no one can wrestle the pencil out of your hand, you get to keep going in absolute defiance”}. And that’s what Aris did.

This is the collage Aris made for my book, Collage. She used the accordion from the starting image I gave all 30 of the artists, and before you knew it “Joan With Her Castle” was born:

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I love that piece so much…. almost as much as Aris loves drawing mouths:

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She wasn’t kidding! Ooh, next… I love this series so much. Same photograph, oh so many different faces:

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This is what Aris does best as far as I’m concerned. Such emotion-filled, personality-exposing expressions.

Ah, I love this next project too. This is also some of her older work, but she had a little help with these ones. Her daughter August, who was 4 at the time, decided to add some hair to these otherwise hairless ladies:

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Beautiful job, August! A fantastic collaboration.

So, I usually like to include photos of the artist’s studio space, and I absolutely love that Aris’ studio is basically wherever her fancy bag of pencils happens to be. Bookshops, cafes, her living room… her studio is the world:

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How fabulous is that!? Granted, it wouldn’t work as well if she was an oil painter, but it certainly works for her! One of the things she’s been doing “in her studio” lately are these flip books. I love what she talked about re: always having a starting place/never having to look at a completely blank page. Brilliant. I’m going to try this:

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Sigh. So fun. So weird… and let’s be honest, if Aris and I lived in the same town we’d be fun, weird friends in a heartbeat! This is how I felt through the whole episode:

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A brand new soul sister  ♥  Thank you so much to Aris for doing this with me {I’m glad I actually recorded some of it!}, thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting the episode, and great BIG thanks to you for listening. If you happen to be over on iTunes, I’d be so grateful for a rating or a review – it helps keep the podcast near the top of the art section, and who doesn’t want to be near the top of the art section!? Ok, there will be more art for your ear next weekend… EPISODE 50 to be exact!

Other links:

  1. Agnes Martin
  2. Esther Pearl Watson’s Comics
  3. Laylah Ali

 





elvira johanna duives

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Tiny, colorful, juicy portraits by Dutch artist Elvira Johanna Duives. Sigh. Love. I’ve written about her drawings before, but just last week she sent me some of her new collage work. My plan had been to write about those… but when I went to her site, well, I found more drawings! I had no power over them, so here they are in all of their bright, vintage, miniature goodness! If you want to see more, and the collages that I’d planned to write about, pop over to her site. Happy Friday.