medium /// installation

ana teresa barboza


I wrote about Peruvian artist Ana Teresa Barboza in 2013, and today I came across her series titled “Weaving the Moment”… obviously I had to write again. I have a major weakness for work that blurs the line between fine art and craft, and this my friends is a perfect example of that blurry line! I can’t get enough of the tangled embroidered roots dangling from the bottom of her canvases, and that crocheted water spilling from it’s wooden tap… oh my… so, so good!

*installation photos taken by Edi Hirose at Wu Galeria

ana beltrá



It probably won’t be surprising if I tell you that Spanish artist Ana Beltrá has just spent a significant amount of time exploring the jungles of Borneo, right? All of these gorgeous pieces are from her latest series, titled “Conjugar Jungla”, clearly inspired by her travels. The electric colors, the layers and movement in her sculptural collages… ahh, it’s almost like being in the jungle {without the snakes and spiders and stuff. Yep, I prefer jungle art to actual jungles I think.}

lisa waud (flower house detroit)


Oh. My. Have you seen this yet? I just stumbled across, The Flower House, a stunning project by Detroit based flower designer Lisa Waud. Here’s the deal – she bought two totally run-down, abandoned houses in Detroit for $500, and then filled the first one with thousands of flowers bringing new, colorful life into this forgotten home if only for a moment. The photos are stunning, but this video {created for her indiegogo campaign to help fill the second house this coming October, then responsibly tear these structures down, and turn the cleared land into a flower farm!} gave me goosebumps. So nostalgic, inspiring, beautiful…

Flower House Teaser from Hello Future Films on Vimeo. Photos by Heather Saunders.

{via My Modern Met}

pip & pop


Oh, thank goodness… she’s still at it! I wrote about Australian artist Tanya Schultz, aka Pip & Pop, waaaay back in 2010, so I was thrilled to see that she’s still creating her magical, sugary, glittery, rainbow-filled worlds! I would love to spend an afternoon in the middle of this insane dream. So many colors. So many special details… pastel sugar lakes, shiny little beads, weird plastic flowers, and that pink polka-dot horse. Yep, I’m gonna need that pink polka-dot horse.

rebecca louise law

rebeccalaw rebeccalaw2

Oh my. I would love to stand underneath, and inside of, any one of these stunning floral installations by British artist Rebecca Louise Law. Literally thousands of flowers, both fresh and dried, connected by copper wire and strategically hung from various ceilings around the world! Why flowers? Her explanation is almost as lovely as the work itself:

“Rebecca traces her decision to be an artist back to a defining moment in her life. The day her dad hurried the family out to have a look at a field of daisies: “it was incredible, thousands of flowers as far as the eye could see, since then I’ve wondered how it would be possible to recreate that moment for others to enjoy.” Then while studying fine art at university, she replaced paint with flowers.”


we make carpets


WE MAKE CARPETS, a collective {Bob, Marcia and Stijn to be exact} based in Amsterdam, make carpets. Kinda. They’re not carpets that you can walk on, or sit on while doing a jigsaw puzzle, or lie on by the fire… ooh, yeah… don’t put that chocolate bar “carpet” by the fire! Mmmm, melty. No, they make art installations out of just about anything they can find – pasta, screws, straws, you name it. So detailed, so fun, and soooo time consuming! Fantastic. ps. I love those bandaids!

christiane löhr


Gasp! Can you tell how badly I want spring to be here? These delicate, organic sculptures and striking pastel drawings/ink paintings are the work of German artist Christiane Löhr. Seeds, grasses, and tiny blossoms arranged into perfect little piles of promise – promise that winter will soon be over. Sigh… if you need me before then, my plan is to hide out in Christiane’s lovely, blossom filled, light-drenched studio:



{via Little Paper Planes / final gallery installation view found on protothema}

titus kaphar


American artist Titus Kaphar paints gorgeous pieces that remind me of my Art History text books… which he then he cuts up and rearranges into modern masterpieces that tell an entirely new story. I am in awe of this work, and this perfect explanation:

“I’ve always been fascinated by history: art history, American history, world history, individual history – how history is written, recorded, distorted, exploited, reimagined, and understood.  In my work I explore the materiality of reconstructive history.  I paint and I sculpt, often borrowing from the historical canon, and then alter the work in some way.  I cut, crumple, shroud, shred, stitch, tar, twist, bind, erase, break, tear, and turn the paintings and sculptures I create, reconfiguring them into works that nod to hidden narratives and begin to reveal unspoken truths about the nature of history.  Open areas become active absences, walls enter into the portraits, stretcher bars are exposed, and structures that are typically invisible underneath, behind, or inside the canvas are laid bare, revealing the interiors of the work.  In so doing, my aim is to perform what I critique, to reveal something of what has been lost, and to investigate the power of a rewritten history.”

Mission accomplished.

davide d’elia


If I was going to invite Wes Anderson and Steve Zissou out for an afternoon in Rome, I would absolutely bring them here! This “Tiffany blue” dipped installation, that transformed the Ex Elettrofonica gallery into a strange boat-like space last fall, is the work of London based artist Davide D’Elia. “Antivegetativa” {the name in Italian of anti-fouling paint often used on old ships}, is composed of a LOT of that gorgeous blue paint, a chair, a buoy and nineteen paintings from old cellars, flea markets, antique shops and junkyards of Rome. Here is an abbreviated statement about this installation:

“Anti-fouling paint of the thick variety is normally applied as a coating for the hulls of old ships and is particular in that it seals out plant and animal organisms to the point of eliminating every possible form of life. The result is an acidic and unreal space, immersed in the abysses of the a material that erases everything, including space, time and life. From the process of immersion of the objects in the paint stems a reflection on a stretch of common history, that of things, and this gives rise to another, much deeper one, on what remains beyond the end of material. Through the process of cancellation of natural processes, Antivegetativa is an experiment in halting nature’s physicality, as well as the passing of time.”  If you’d like to read the entire artist’s statement, pop over to Davide’s site.

{via designboom}

nicole crock


Gasp! Vintage images that have been found, copied, mirrored, and folded into beautiful installations by American artist Nicole Crock. Both of these stunning pieces are from her series titled Tessellate… I think my heart might be tessellating a little bit.