medium /// installation

we make carpets


WE MAKE CARPETS, a collective {Bob, Marcia and Stijn to be exact} based in Amsterdam, make carpets. Kinda. They’re not carpets that you can walk on, or sit on while doing a jigsaw puzzle, or lie on by the fire… ooh, yeah… don’t put that chocolate bar “carpet” by the fire! Mmmm, melty. No, they make art installations out of just about anything they can find – pasta, screws, straws, you name it. So detailed, so fun, and soooo time consuming! Fantastic. ps. I love those bandaids!

christiane löhr


Gasp! Can you tell how badly I want spring to be here? These delicate, organic sculptures and striking pastel drawings/ink paintings are the work of German artist Christiane Löhr. Seeds, grasses, and tiny blossoms arranged into perfect little piles of promise – promise that winter will soon be over. Sigh… if you need me before then, my plan is to hide out in Christiane’s lovely, blossom filled, light-drenched studio:



{via Little Paper Planes / final gallery installation view found on protothema}

titus kaphar


American artist Titus Kaphar paints gorgeous pieces that remind me of my Art History text books… which he then he cuts up and rearranges into modern masterpieces that tell an entirely new story. I am in awe of this work, and this perfect explanation:

“I’ve always been fascinated by history: art history, American history, world history, individual history – how history is written, recorded, distorted, exploited, reimagined, and understood.  In my work I explore the materiality of reconstructive history.  I paint and I sculpt, often borrowing from the historical canon, and then alter the work in some way.  I cut, crumple, shroud, shred, stitch, tar, twist, bind, erase, break, tear, and turn the paintings and sculptures I create, reconfiguring them into works that nod to hidden narratives and begin to reveal unspoken truths about the nature of history.  Open areas become active absences, walls enter into the portraits, stretcher bars are exposed, and structures that are typically invisible underneath, behind, or inside the canvas are laid bare, revealing the interiors of the work.  In so doing, my aim is to perform what I critique, to reveal something of what has been lost, and to investigate the power of a rewritten history.”

Mission accomplished.

davide d’elia


If I was going to invite Wes Anderson and Steve Zissou out for an afternoon in Rome, I would absolutely bring them here! This “Tiffany blue” dipped installation, that transformed the Ex Elettrofonica gallery into a strange boat-like space last fall, is the work of London based artist Davide D’Elia. “Antivegetativa” {the name in Italian of anti-fouling paint often used on old ships}, is composed of a LOT of that gorgeous blue paint, a chair, a buoy and nineteen paintings from old cellars, flea markets, antique shops and junkyards of Rome. Here is an abbreviated statement about this installation:

“Anti-fouling paint of the thick variety is normally applied as a coating for the hulls of old ships and is particular in that it seals out plant and animal organisms to the point of eliminating every possible form of life. The result is an acidic and unreal space, immersed in the abysses of the a material that erases everything, including space, time and life. From the process of immersion of the objects in the paint stems a reflection on a stretch of common history, that of things, and this gives rise to another, much deeper one, on what remains beyond the end of material. Through the process of cancellation of natural processes, Antivegetativa is an experiment in halting nature’s physicality, as well as the passing of time.”  If you’d like to read the entire artist’s statement, pop over to Davide’s site.

{via designboom}

nicole crock


Gasp! Vintage images that have been found, copied, mirrored, and folded into beautiful installations by American artist Nicole Crock. Both of these stunning pieces are from her series titled Tessellate… I think my heart might be tessellating a little bit.

chris wood

Whoa. These are glass wall panel installations by UK based artist Chris Wood. She says that her work is about expressing the “magic of light”. Um… nailed it! She uses dichroic glass, and in case you’ve never heard of dichroic glass, here you go:

“Dichroic (meaning two colour) is an optical coating that selectively reflects certain wavelengths  of light and allows the remaining wavelengths to transmit through. Developed in the late fifties by NASA to protect against the potentially harmful effects of direct sunlight and cosmic radiation, dichroic glass, with its striking visual qualities, has been used in a variety of scientific and industrial applications. The material shifts from being reflective like a golden mirror to vibrantly coloured or almost transparent, depending upon the viewpoint and angle of light. It is a material that very eloquently expresses the magic of the phenomenon of light.”

Oh yeah… I totally knew that.

{via Colossal}


Yes. I need to refuel my car here, and only here. “No.27 – A Nod to Ed Ruscha” is a street installation in Limerick City, Ireland. The artist behind this fabulous petrol station is Maser. Here are a few more of his installations. I would so stay in this motel, or climb around on that gorgeous sculpture:

Wait for me, kids!

lucy sparrow

Oh my word. I wish so much that I lived in Bethnal Green, east London, so that I could pop into this newly transformed cornershop! Everything, and I mean EVERYTHING {even the cash register!} is made of felt! British artist Lucy Sparrow has taken a rundown storefront, and turned it into a completely stocked “felt” market {just under 4000 items!}… felt chips, felt beer, felt magazines, felt canned ravioli, felt candy, felt ketchup, felt popsicles… ok, I’m sure you get it, but it’s all just so awesome, I feel like I should make a little grocery list! Speaking of awesome, this quote by Lucy is just about perfect:

“I’m very obsessive and I want that to come across in the work and get people thinking ‘Who would be crazy enough to do this?'”

Yep. We’re all thinkin’ it! This crazy little shop is open for business until August 31… GO!!!!!! ps. if  you aren’t in London, you can also visit her online shop!

{Open every day from 10am – 7pm : 19 Wellington Row, London : via The MIRROR}

tara donovan

Giant/fluffy pussy willows, and pink stalagmites? Nope. Bunches of acrylic rods, and stacks of buttons. Insane. This is the breathtaking work of Brooklyn based installation artist Tara Donovan. Just imagine seeing this work in person… well, you can if you happen to be on either US coast this summer! Yep, PACE New York and PACE Menlo Park California have Tara’s work showing until mid August. You’re going to go, right?!

andrea mastrovito

Whoa. Now THIS brings found image collage to a whole, entirely new, super crazy level! This is an installation from 2013 in Switzerland by Italian artist Andrea Mastrovito. It’s titled The Island of Dr. Mastrovito II and is made from thousands of bits and pieces from flora and fauna books, reassembled into the craziest little ecosystem EVER! So amazing! I would love to see this in person so that I could take a really close look at all of the many, many, many layers. And maybe even meet this little guy…


{Thanks to my friend Mary for posting this on Facebook yesterday… instalove!}