medium /// painting




artsnacks : august box

Ahhh, August. I just got back from spending the majority of the month in Venice!? I saw insane installations, glass sculptures, huge paintings, and a lot of very conceptual artwork. I took in more art than one person can handle {not to mention the pasta and gelato}. When I arrived home, this month’s artsy mystery box from ArtSnacks was waiting for me :

Yum! Obviously I had no choice but to stage my own mini Biennale using all of these new supplies… inky paintings, candy sculptures, and you guessed it, a gift shop! {In case you didn’t see the June and July posts, I’ve decided to team up with these guys once a month because, quite frankly, I love their art-filled boxes. Let’s face it – the more supplies you have, the more art you’ll make, and the more artwork I’ll have to write about. Plus, they put CANDY in every box! Win-win.}

So, on with the show. NOTE: No flash photography allowed 

Ah yes, there might be a line-up or two, but when it’s your turn you can totally eat that sugary sculpture… very interactive, indeed. But wait, there’s more! A trip to any gallery would not be complete without this :

Oh yeah, baby – exit through the gift shop! I have to admit, I love gallery gift shops… and in Italy, they are particularly fantastic! Now, if you’re not in the market for any of these ‘works of art’ that I whipped up, perhaps I can interest you in the September ArtSnacks box. You can still get it if you sign up by August 31. Order one month at a time or sign up for 3 months, 6 months, or a full year… whatever works for you. Click here for all of the ins and outsps. enter coupon code ‘thejealouscurator’ and you’ll receive 10% off your first month of ArtSnacks! ps. hashtag your box openings / what you make with, #artsnacks

In the August box: Amsterdam Acrylic Ink (I got ‘Burnt Umber’); Princeton Velvet Touch Long Round Brush; ZIG Cocoira Letter Pen – Body & Ink; Faber-Castell Ecco Pigment Fibre-Tip Pen; A yummy roll of Necco candy!




zoe young

Annnnnd exhale. Ah, these quiet, everyday moments have been captured beautifully by Australian painter Zoe Young. All of these pieces are from her series titled “Space Between Hours”. Here’s the write up from her site about this work:

“Space Between Hours” is a retreat and a space to meditate, away from the noise and chaos of modern life. It is the expression of an artist whose life and artistic practice are harmoniously intertwined.

This body of work reveals the significance that objects, both collected and inherited, hold for the artist. For instance, Young incorporates studies of artworks that have resonated with her since childhood, such as Benjamin Edwin Minns’ etching Aboriginal mother & child (1925) which features in Ode to Minns (2017). In this way, she pays homage to her Grandfather’s art collection and enters into a dialogue with these artists across time and space … Zoe Young’s still life compositions are unashamedly feminine, and are an intimate reflection of her environment and lifestyle, as a mother of two working from a countryside studio. Since having children Young has become wary of the accelerated pace of modern life. Her paintings are an attempt to slow down and grasp time, by capturing unique, tranquil moments and distilling them on canvas.

Lovely. {ps. Note that the first painting is hanging on the wall in the last painting!}





monica lee-henell

Big beautiful abstract-ish blooms! This is the newest body of work by American artist Monica Lee-Henell. She’s worked as an illustrator for years, but has recently decided to begin moving away from the commercial world to create her own personal work. Enter these large-scale paintings, a saturated, rich fine blend between floral and abstract. I love the final pieces but, I have to admit, I’m a sucker for her works in progress / studio shots … you can find more on her lovely Instagram feed. Here are a few words found on Monica’s site about why she has made this creative change in her life:

“An artist’s job is to be awake. Remain awake and awaken others. We are not meant to slumber through our gorgeous, lush lives.

I want my art to feel intimate and generous, to create a sensory experience for myself, and for the viewer. The art is meant to linger in the delicate space of your psyche. As an artist, I want to create an emotional impression causing you to ask yourself what you might not be seeing on the surface.”

Lovely.





caitlyn murphy

Hot summer in the city – I can smell these paintings from here! Yep, a fine blend of overripe fruit, damp cardboard, and cigarettes. Ahhh, makes me miss the days when I lived at Queen & Spadina … kinda. This is the memory-inducing work {gouache on paper} of Toronto based artist Caitlyn Murphy. Happy Friday… and don’t forget to buy your watermelon in the morning before it gets too hot!





joe suzuki

Haring, Warhol, Basquiat … and a whole bunch of colorful poured paint! These paint sculptures {is that a thing?} are the fantastic work of Japanese-American, California based artist Joe Suzuki. Funny, smart, and a modern ode to Pop Art that makes me smile {like a hot pink smiley face}. Here is Joe’s statement:

I consider my work to be artifacts of my own particular culture, which is not the generalized Japanese American culture, but that which formed as a direct result of being a first generation immigrant. Through a long assimilation process, I found myself not fully belonging to either culture, but rather somewhere in between, which I began to call Japamerica.

In my peculiar culture, customs and traditions are born out of misunderstandings or idiosyncrasies, and myths and legends are often formed through the struggles of everyday life. I am fascinated by and curious about my culture’s development and the affect it has on my identity. I see my art making as an investigation that captures and documents my ever changing, mutating, polyglot reality. My work is informed by my life, contingent on my ordinary, real world experiences as a middle class Japamerican dad, who is simply trying to make sense of it all.

{via Artsy}





heidi leitzke

Oh! Magical, Dr.Suess-ish wonderlands… enter the world of  American artist Heidi Leitzke. These pieces are from her “thread paintings” series. Her color choices are beautiful and her imagination is clearly top notch! Now, how do I go to there on this fine Monday morning?





antoinette ferwerda

Gasp! I’d love to wander around in these pastel-hued, magical, and very hilly wonderlands from morning till night! These mixed media pieces are the work of Australian artist Antoinette Ferwerda. This is what she does…

“… [Antoinette] explores the use of colour to evoke emotion.  Patterns in nature are still her fascination.  Her design stories and themes encourage a personal, thought-provoking connection with her art.  Her compositions reflect light, capture the geometry of shape and make Australian landscapes playful and abstract.” 

Beautiful.





chambers austelle

Weird portraits. Yep, always a favorite of mine! This is the latest body of work by American artist Chambers Austelle. I wrote about an older series of hers … also weird portraits… when one of them appeared on the cover of Fresh Paint Magazine {now Create Magazine}. I loved those weirdo women, and I love these ladies too!





clare elsaesser

When I started The Jealous Curator way back in 2009, I’m pretty sure I wrote about California based painter Clare Elsaesser every ten minutes or so. Well, just for fun I swooped past her site today, and look what I found! Her work has always been lovely, but she’s managed to evolve her work into something even lovelier! Sigh…. and now I want to dance in a meadow with those dreamy, washy women.

{All of Claire’s work, both originals and prints, can be found in her online shop.}





hugo alonso

Ok, I’m a little bit scared… I think the call might be coming from inside the house! Eeeee! Luckily, nothing is going to jump out of the darkness because these are not movie stills, they’re part of a series of stunning airbrush on paper paintings. Really. These cinematic gems are the work of Spanish painter {yes, I need to reiterate that these are paintings} Hugo Alonso. Here are a few words from the Galerie Youn site about Hugo’s work:

… Alonso lets us be seduced by the uncertain, in his own words, by a “hole behind a painting that one can approach so as to peer at that which seems far off to us in a strange manner, with a disturbing familiarity”. Hugo Alonso does not just work on deconstructing the processes of accessing painting but also the logic of the cinema and its elements ‘setting, plan, set dressing’ which he reorganizes in order to show new links to fiction, to a certain extent calling up the phantasmagorical.

Disturbing familiarity. YES.

{via Galerie Youn}