medium /// painting




morwenna morrison

When paintings look like collages? LOVE! These ‘romanticism meets nostalgia’ oil paintings are the work of UK based artist Morwenna Morrison. I’ve included her statement about this work, because she describes it perfectly:

“My recent body of work explores ideas around nostalgia and romanticism. The word nostalgia was coined during the 17th Century, the same time that Claude Lorrain was painting his idealised landscapes. Nostalgia is our notion of happier times – the past improved with age – a hankering after a time that doesn’t exist apart from in our minds, ‘those were the days’.  The feeling is bittersweet.” 

Ah yes… bittersweet, indeed.





mercedes helnwein

Have I had these pieces in my drafts folder for ages just waiting for today? Yes, yes I have! This is the work of Austrian born, LA based artist Mercedes Helnwein  I’ve written about her before {back in 2014}, and obviously I fell in love all over again when I saw these nostalgia-filled images {oil pastel on paper}. Thank goodness Halloween is finally here … I couldn’t wait much longer. Happy Halloween!





jenna douglass

Now this is a lovely way to start a Monday. This is the soft, layered, mixed media work of Seattle based artist Jenna Douglass. I love her mixture of found images, washy paint, and perfect graphite lines. Perhaps it’s the palette, but they all feel like a dewy spring morning …  a dewy spring morning that makes me want to get into the studio! Happy Monday.

ps. Some of her leaf pieces are available in her shop.





michela picchi

Rawr. Ok, just to be clear, Italian born, Berlin based cross-disciplinary artist Michela Picchi does paint more than tigers, but I couldn’t control myself. Can you blame me? Her tigers, and tigers ‘n girls, and more tigers are fan-freaking-tastic … clearly, a perfect way to end the week   ♥ ♥  





sea hyun lee

“Between Red” is a gorgeous, albeit scary, oil painting series by South Korean artist Sea Hyun Lee. The reason I say scary? He served in the military, and these insanely detailed mountain views are what he saw in the de-militarized zone between North and South Korea. Next question… why red?

“I would wear night vision goggles, which coated everything in red. The forests and trees felt so fantastic and beautiful. It was unrealistic scenery filled with horror and fear, and with no possibility of entering.”

Beautiful, while absolutely terrifying.





ambera wellmann

Super beautiful / bizarre porcelain? Nope, even better… oil paintings of super beautiful / bizarre porcelain. This is the weirdly wonderful work of Canadian painter Ambera Wellmann. She also happens to be the 2017 winner of the RBC Painting Competition, a prestigious {and lucrative} award given to one Canadian painter each year. Excellent choice jurors, excellent choice!





amy sherald

Oh, the paintings of Baltimore based painter Amy Sherald. I love her work, and guess who else does? Michelle Obama. Yes! On October 13th, it was announced that the former first lady has chosen Amy to paint her official portrait for the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery! Amazing, and literally the perfect choice. I cannot wait to see the final painting. Can. Not. Wait.

ps. President Obama made a wonderful choice too… Kehinde Wiley will be painting Barack’s portrait!

SaveSave





“what’s the why”

So, that’s a painting. Yeah. I’ve been dying to talk to Canadian artist Lindsay Arnold about this ongoing series for ages. It’s titled “Tedium”, and in case you haven’t listened to the episode yet, I read her artist statement about this work. I’m going to post it here too because it’s just too perfect to be missed:

“In my grandmother’s time the doily was required for protecting surfaces, concealing imperfections, ornamenting surroundings, and measuring status. Today doilies are found in abundance at thrift stories, auctions and forgotten linen closets. Hours of female labour are represented in these worn, stained and unfashionable objects. The imperfections which have rendered the doilies unusable for their original purpose inspire narratives which are further explored through interactions with objects such as scissors, pins, and utensils. The doilies are stretched, torn, and misshapen, such as we are by marriage, illness, motherhood and more. “Tedium” is way to honour the difficult experiences which leave us worn, acknowledge thankless repetitive labour, and reveal a part of the anonymous doily maker’s story.” ~ Lindsay Arnold

See? Beautiful, and it sets up everything you’re about to see. That said, here are a few of my favorite paintings from this gorgeous series:

Oh my word. They’re just too good. Paintings. How are they paintings?

Now, before I show you all of the other pieces I’m in love with from that series, I want to show you a few of the drawings from one of Lindsay’s earlier series, titled very appropriately, “Rooted”:

Ah yes, I remember all of that from those first few years as a new mother. Sigh. So lovely, so smart … and fantastic that her mentor at the time, Canadian artist Holly Fay, encouraged her to turn these from something she did while her baby napped, into a full project bound into a gorgeous “artist book”.

And now, back to “Tedium”! This is where it began… perfect doilies drawn with a dip pen and white ink. And those shadows… oh, the shadows {they’re what made me assume these were photos during a quick scroll-by}:

… and then things started to get not so perfect, because imperfection is so much more interesting {and real!}:

Seriously. Paintings. Now, how about watching some real doilies in action! Here’s a trailer for the video Lindsay created using her delicate muses:

So fun! If you’d like to see the full video, you can find it right here.

Speaking of fun …

Yes, both Lindsay and I in all our catty / Halloweenie goodness! Meow. Thanks so much to Lindsay for answering all of my prying questions; thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting yet another episode; and HUGE thanks to you for listening. I’m on my way to the University of Wisconsin for the entire week, because they’ve invited me to be a visiting professor – obviously I’ve tried desperately to buy a corduroy jacket with elbow patches, but alas, nothing. Anyway, all of this to say there won’t be a podcast this coming weekend, so have a great Halloween {I’m sure we’ve inspired you with our costumes}, and I will be back with a new episode on Saturday, November 4th!

ps. If you want to listen to an older episode while I’m away, you can find all one hundred and ten of them right here.

Other links:

  1. SAIT, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology
  2. Holly Fay, Artist
  3. Martha Cole, Artist
  4. Lindsay’s Instagram feed
  5. Video Pool
  6. Lindsay’s video, “Table Dance”

 





laura payne

What? Acrylic paintings, that’s what. This is the very precise work of Canadian artist Laura Payne. I feel a tiny bit dizzy, but in a really, really good way. I’m not sure how this is the first time I’m seeing Laura’s work, but thankfully, she was a finalist in the RBC Painting Competition and so her stunning work showed up in my inbox this morning. Now I want one.

 





sarah detweiler

In case you’re wondering, yes, those geometric bits are embroidery surrounding those beautiful washy women… GAH! So beautiful. This is the work of American artist Sarah Detweiler. Some of her pieces are available in her Etsy shop. After you pop over there, I’d highly recommend following her on Instagram. Gorgeous finished pieces, works in progress, and lovely little videos of both. Dreamy.