medium /// photography




“never say never”

I literally have no idea where to start this week. When your guest is a photographer, filmmaker, installation artist, curator, maker, and general renaissance woman it’s hard to find a place to jump in… so we started at the beginning and covered a fraction of the projects that this woman has been involved with. Yep, I’m talking to American artist, curator etc., Faythe Levine. Listen right up there under that very wise photograph, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First, a few of her photographs, as Faythe always documents where life takes her:

Ahhhh, dreamy. Up next, a project that if you haven’t seen, you should … her film, followed by a book of the same title, “Handmade Nation”:

It’s so good, and it really is a like a time capsule from those early maker days when everything DIY exploded! Ok, next amazing project. “Sign Painters”, once again a documentary and book:

Faythe and Sam Macon did such a beautiful job on this film. If you haven’t seen it, see it!

Next, the most recent book Faythe put together… an unpublished play written by her friend Merril Mushroom. The play, and now the book, is titled “Bar Dykes”:

There are so many of Faythe’s projects to cover (and we haven’t even discussed the tip of the iceberg?!), but I didn’t want to miss this… Art vs. Craft, a juried show that she organized and ran for ten years (2003-2013) in Milwaukee:

Don’t you want to jump into that photo and do some art shopping!? Me too. And finally, a few very cool photos to go with Faythe’s very cool story… tattoos and new gold tooth included:

Babe. Thank you so much to Faythe for taking a break from her new 9 to 5 life as Assistant Curator at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center to talk to me; thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting the episode; and thank YOU for listening! There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Etsy
  2. Renegade Craft Fair
  3. Faythe on Instagram

 





thirza schaap

“Plastic Ocean” is, unfortunately, an ongoing series by Thirza Schaap. While her compositions and palettes are beautiful, her supplies are tragic. Here is her statement about this important project:

“As a child, I would walk over beaches and through fields and forests to collect beautiful shells, shimmering stones, feathers and funnily shaped branches. Much later, after I had moved from Holland to South Africa, I found myself doing the same thing. Only to discover, that I started filling my pockets with trash instead of treasure. Plastic from the Ocean – colourful and beautiful in its own tragic way. 

‘Plastic Ocean’ is an art project, which I started to create awareness around pollution to try and prevent (or at least reduce) the use of plastic. In making artistic sculptures out of the objects I find, I try to evoke an emotional response  from my audience by creating a contradiction – a clash between initial aesthetic attraction and after a second look : repulsion and the realisation of the tragedy  trash causes. Our beaches are covered in plastic confetti and there really is nothing to celebrate.”

Amen.

ps. You can follow along on Thirza’s Instagram feed. Again, beautiful and tragic all in one breath.





sarah elise abramson

Love, love, love! This is the work of Los Angeles based photographer Sarah Elise Abramson, and FYI, the final image above is self portrait of Sarah… x3. Her portfolio is full of gorgeous, bizarre, glitter covered goodness but her Instagram feed… ooh, I could spend all day there! I love the peek behind the scenes (ie the photo of Sarah above), and outtakes from her weird and wonderful shoots. LOVE.





yuni kim lang

“Comfort Hair”… Wow. This is the stunning work of Korean born, US based artist Yuni Kim Lang. This gorgeous series is referencing Korean gache, wigs that women of high society used to wear… and the bigger, heavier, and more adorned the better – obviously! Now, I’m sure you’re wondering if this is actual human hair :

[Lang] … creates sculptures, photographs and wearable art that explores themes of weight, mass, accumulation, hair and cultural identity. She creates sculptures out of rope and synthetic materials where it transcends its materiality and become bodily. She is fascinated by what people give power and meaning to, along with our obsession with adornment. 

Ah-ha! It is in fact synthetic rope that she buys from the hardware store and then manipulates until it becomes a braided, shiny, glorious – and unbelievably HEAVY – piece of art. LOVE!





romina ressia

Past and present, fashion and fine art, classic and contemporary. These are the gorgeous works of Argentinian photographer Romina Ressia. I have to admit… she had me at bubblegum. I found her work via Arusha Gallery in Edinburgh. Here is their description of her background and work:

“The inspiration for these unusual portraits stems from Romina’s fascination with the fashion photography which had always drawn her attention, but her work departs from the usual fare and enters a different space altogether.

There is an element of surrealism to her pictures which combine unique artifacts to present a personal reflection upon advancing technologies and cultural movements set against images of classical beauty in painterly-lit backgrounds.”

Lovely.





josh huxham

Oh. I have a physical reaction to this series by UK based artist Josh Huxham. In particular, the image of the pilot and the plane. My grandfather was a pilot in WW II, and in his later years his memory started to fail … unless you asked him about flying and then he could tell you everything! So many detailed stories about training, and friends, and meeting my grandmother on a weekend leave at the beach. These quiet yet powerful images feel like identities, lost stories, and memories all rolled into one beautiful photograph. Here are Josh’s words on this graduate project {yes, he’s only just recently graduated from the Plymouth College of Art}, titled “Silence” …

‘Silence’ explores the re-construction of the family photograph. By using various techniques to re-print, re-age and re-construct previously scanned photographs from his family archive, Josh’s work aims to connect with those closest to him through visual language. By constructing these surreal handmade photographs, Josh’s inner thoughts and emotions towards a family space he feels lost within are passed on to the viewer. Exploring this media continues to allow Josh to be vocal through the visual.

Beautiful. And now I miss my grandparents more than usual.





anne ten donkelaar

Oh my goodness. This is the latest breathtaking work from Dutch artist Anne Ten Donkelaar. I’ve written about her insanely beautiful and intricate botanical collages before but, as you can see, her work has taken a slightly new, slightly wetter direction! Enter “Underwater Ballet”…

“A choreography for flowers, dancing on the subtile sounds of air bubbles. Floating gracefully around in the cold water. 
A silent image of a spirited dance.”

Sigh… absolutely beautiful.

ps. The Cold Press will be exhibiting new work by Anne ten Donkelaar at the London Design Festival, this weekend from 21-24 September 2017. Find them at the London Design Fair, Truman Brewery, London. Stand – E1 





isabelle menin

Magical, fairytale, flora-filled dreamscapes by Brussels based photographer Isabelle Menin. Yes, photographer. I totally thought these were collages or insane paintings when I first saw them, but no, they’re manipulated photographs. Here is a chunk of Isabelle’s bio to give a bit of background:

After graduating from the Graphic Research School (ERG) in Brussels, she has explored painting for 10 years while working in graphic design and illustration. Nature has always been a recurring theme for the artist, particularly flora. After exhibiting several times in Belgium, Isabelle Menin decided to abandon painting to turn to digital photography. Taking pictures, scanning pieces of nature, the artist constantly plays with textures and colours, transforming them, mixing them, in order to give shape to a fictional nature, dense and flamboyant at the same time.

There’s also a really interesting interview on her site that goes into deep detail about how/why she does what she does.

{Some of her work is currently hanging in a group show, titled “Garden on Orchard”, at Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York – Opening Reception July 12, 6-8pm – show runs until August 19}





laura hendricks

I want to go there. But I can’t. None of us can. Nope, American artist (Utah based) Laura Hendricks photographs all sorts of lovely locations, and then combines them, creating dreamy collaged together places that don’t exist anywhere else except her portfolio. Here’s why she does what she does…

… [Laura] CAPTURES THE INTERESTING ELEMENTS OF NATURE (MOST OFTEN SKIES AND LANDSCAPES) FROM TWO DIFFERENT LOCATIONS AND COMBINES THEM TO CREATE ONE IMAGE. THE END RESULT IS OFTEN OTHER-WORLDLY BUT ALMOST ALWAYS BELIEVABLE. THESE PHOTO COMBINATIONS ARE MEANT TO REMIND PEOPLE HOW THEY FEEL, INSTEAD OF WHAT THEY SEE, WHEN WITNESSING SPECTACULAR, NATURAL LANDSCAPES AND SCENES. 

Well, consider me reminded! Love.





summer camp 2 : the first mark

Hey there, Campers! Welcome to week 2 of 15 at AFYE Summer Camp… but before we dive in, I want to show you just a handful of images created by some of you for last week’s art project (hashtagged #AFYEcamp). They were all so good! This was an Instagram-a-Day project, with an assigned prompt for each day. There were HUNDREDS of images taken because, well, you guys are amazing. Here are just a few from each prompt (photo credits at the bottom of this post) :

Day One : Vintage

Day Two : Wood

Day Three : Make

Day Four : Blue

Day Five : Boat

Day Six : Nature

Day Seven : Snacks

 

Love, love, love (and even a little nod to Twin Peaks). If you wanna see what everybody’s doing, or contribute your own work, just use the hashtag #AFYEcamp. Alright, time for today’s episode:

Art Project No.2 

Collaboration-Nation : “Ruining” perfect white paper can be terrifying… so let someone else do it! Ask a friend or family member to make the first mark (their color and medium of choice) on a white page or on that perfect canvas you’ve been avoiding, and then you take it from there! Work around their mark, over it, whatever. ps. I also suggested having more than one piece (and maybe more than one friend making marks) on the go. This idea is thanks to the wonderful advice from this week’s featured artist…

Artist Example: 

Ah yes, Lola Donoghue. She loves working on BWCs (Big White Canvases) which, quite frankly, seems like a nightmare to me. Here is some of Lola’s work, along with a few studio shots so you can see how many big canvases she manages to fit into her lovely studio in the Irish countryside:

Look at all of those glorious happy accidents and creative potholes!

And finally, I promised these images too. Marcel Duchamp as his alter-ego, ‘Rrose’, photographed by Man Ray:

You’re welcome.

Another week of camp done, another s’moreo eaten! Thank you to Saatchi Art for supporting summer camp, and thanks so much to you for listening! AFYE camp continues next weekend… but until then, be sure to hashtag your ‘first mark made by another’ on Instagram with #AFYEcamp. Have fun, and embrace those happy accidents!

Other links:

  1. Your Inner Critic Is A Big Jerk, by me
  2. Secret Lives of Great Artists, by Elizabeth Lunday
  3. Lola Donoghue on AFYE : Episode 50

*Photo credits from Project No.1, in the order they appear above:

Vintage: 1. @septemberwren  2. @caballo_rosa  3. @vanittasr  //  Wood: 1. @catseatdogsmakes  2. @alabamathirteen  3. @cindymcd  //  Make: 1. @celkovich  2. @thejealouscurator  3. @flyonthewall602  //  Blue: 1. @juliehamiltoncreative  2. @mariko_koda  3. @stephillo  //  Boat: 1. @bababeloco  2. @taytayshenaynay  3. @meganwoodardjohnsonart  //  Nature: 1. @neotimes  2. @emilyezarse  3. @tara.axford  //  Snacks: 1. @vanittasr  2. @modernfibre  3. @heathersundquist