medium /// sculpture

philippa beveridge


Gasp! Glass change purses, filled with quiet traces of mystery contents. They are part of an ongoing series by British artist Philippa Beveridge, titled Lost & Found. Here, in her words, is how this work came to be:

“[These] works deal with the concept of collective and individual identity through the everyday form of a purse: a belonging which is often lost, stolen or mislaid, full of sentimental value and charged with personal memories. I began to make this work during a three-month long artist’s residency in Northern France. I invited local residents to visit me at the studio and show me the contents of their purses.  Building on the theme of traces, I highlighted the objects and details found in the purses to forge histories and construct identities. The resulting imagery, trapped in the material, expresses notions of time, memories and sentiments which lean towards metaphorical interpretations in relation to one’s own past.”

Sigh… lovely.

christiane löhr


Gasp! Can you tell how badly I want spring to be here? These delicate, organic sculptures and striking pastel drawings/ink paintings are the work of German artist Christiane Löhr. Seeds, grasses, and tiny blossoms arranged into perfect little piles of promise – promise that winter will soon be over. Sigh… if you need me before then, my plan is to hide out in Christiane’s lovely, blossom filled, light-drenched studio:



{via Little Paper Planes / final gallery installation view found on protothema}

Ignacio Canales Aracil


Pressed flowers. Just flowers. Spanish artist Ignacio Canales Aracil collects flowers from the private gardens of the most renowned landscape designers in Europe and then presses them into large molds. He gets no help from adhesives… just a month long drying process and the loving, miraculous touch of mother nature. When they’re complete he adds a spray of light varnish to protect them from moisture. So amazing… delicate and stunningly beautiful.

{via Colossal}

nicole crock


Gasp! Vintage images that have been found, copied, mirrored, and folded into beautiful installations by American artist Nicole Crock. Both of these stunning pieces are from her series titled Tessellate… I think my heart might be tessellating a little bit.

recheng tsang


Oh. How amazing would it be to have an elegant porcelain installation by California based artist ReCheng Tsang in your home?! Usually I post images of gallery exhibits, but I love that these gorgeous pieces are shown in dining rooms and hallways. She specializes in site specific work… aaaand now I’m imagining those white and gold ovals in a specific site… my living room. Love.

tiffanie turner & simone truong

I cannot even express how much I love this. I wrote about both of these artists during 2014… the first is the paper-sculpture work of San Francisco based artist Tiffanie Turner, and the second is the manipulated photographic work of UK based artist Simone Truong. Have a look:

Gorgeous, right? Well they thought so too! Tiffanie saw Simone’s work when I wrote about it, and reached out to see if Simone would be up for doing a collaboration… she said YES! Amazing! Here’s the result:

Gasp! Tiffanie’s paper flowers melting like birthday cake icing in July! Here is their joint statement about this project:

“Although working in different mediums, different scales and even different countries, artists Simone Truong and Tiffanie Turner both have one element in common; their subject matter. Flora are at the center of both of their works, inevitably forging an exploration into the difference in scale and mediums. In this new work, Truong strays away from exploring the transitionary states that occur in natural phenomena to embrace the delicate and still beauty of Turner’s giant, intricate paper flowers. By scaling these large, explosive blooms back down to a size manageable on the printed page, Truong captures their solitary beauty in a way their original capacity never would have granted. Truong and Turner worked together to find the tension and balance in these compositions, which were executed by Truong in her UK studio.”

Love. You can find & buy these lovely pieces right here.

david baerwalde

Wooden. Cake. I am in love. LOVE! Atlanta based artist David Baerwalde has a portfolio full of all sorts of interesting things, both sculptural and on paper, but it was these layered, raw yet totally perfect, sawdust as coconut, glazed chunks of chocolate ganache, I mean wood, that got me. Sigh. I would love to own a platter of these perfect slices. Amazing.

{via Anthology Magazine}

zin helena song

Bold, colorful, graphic paintings that literally pop off the wall! These are the painted wood pieces of New York based Korean artist Zin Helena Song… love! And speaking of love, scroll back up a tiny bit to see the two pieces that she’s added colored light to! Sigh. Stunning.

{via Design Milk … and there’s a great interview with her there too!}

chris wood

Whoa. These are glass wall panel installations by UK based artist Chris Wood. She says that her work is about expressing the “magic of light”. Um… nailed it! She uses dichroic glass, and in case you’ve never heard of dichroic glass, here you go:

“Dichroic (meaning two colour) is an optical coating that selectively reflects certain wavelengths  of light and allows the remaining wavelengths to transmit through. Developed in the late fifties by NASA to protect against the potentially harmful effects of direct sunlight and cosmic radiation, dichroic glass, with its striking visual qualities, has been used in a variety of scientific and industrial applications. The material shifts from being reflective like a golden mirror to vibrantly coloured or almost transparent, depending upon the viewpoint and angle of light. It is a material that very eloquently expresses the magic of the phenomenon of light.”

Oh yeah… I totally knew that.

{via Colossal}

frances lambe

Oh. My. This is the perforated, pokey, smooth, organic ceramic work of Irish sculptor Frances Lambe. Instead of trying to explain this myself, I’m going to let this paragraph, found on Frances’ site, do all of the work in describing these pieces:

The work springs from visual research into disparate areas of interest including geography, biology, botany and astronomy. She is fascinated by the visual ‘inter-relatedness’ of life on our planet. Life forms that exist underwater mimic those on land. Visual information distilled from a variety of sources is combined in individual pieces. Observed effects of weathering on surfaces influences the form and texture of the work.

Yes. Well said.