carolyn gavin


Ooh, pages jam-packed with collections of nature’s wonders! Love love love… perhaps it’s because I grew up in a house with my artistic mother who painted watercolor mushrooms, but these fungi spoke to me immediately. And then, the succulents of course… who can resist a watercolor cacti!? Not me. This is the fun, candy-hued work of Canadian artist Carolyn Gavin. ps. Prints, ridiculously affordable prints, of her whimsical work can be found in her shop.





nadiuska & priscila furtado

Ah, the lovely drawings and ceramic work of Brazil based sisters, Nadiuska and Priscila Furtado. They started this collaborative project under the name Uinverso, and this is why:

“As the name means inverted , it is also related to the  universe in physical existence and in the perspective that each species is a universe inserted in another.”

Beautiful. {You can find their work – originals, prints, ceramics, pins – in their shop}





leah bartholomew

Somewhere between collage and painting lives this lovely work by Australian artist Leah Bartholomew. Sigh. Well, technically they’re gorgeous paintings, but they start out as torn paper collages. Here is the description from Leah’s site:

The ritual of daily walks play an integral part in forming the initial concepts for her pieces. Her vast paintings begin as small torn paper collages, an intuitive puzzle of unexpected colours and feelings that take shape based on the influences of her environment and mood. These collages may represent the colours of the weather, or how the warmth of the rocks on the beach felt, or the blinding brightness of an electric blue sky. The colour palette is carefully chosen in response to this and the paper collages then inform the large scale paintings. Each day is different and her affinity with the landscape provides endless material to respond to.

I love all of that. Who wants to go for a walk in Australia? Me too.





lisa anne auerbach

Yep, 2008… isn’t it a little more than insane that all of these absolutely fantastic skirt & sweater sets apply perfectly TODAY. This is the work of LA based artist Lisa Anne Auerbach. She continues to use knitting and text to put her messages into the world, but when I stumbled across these pieces I didn’t realize they weren’t brand new work until I saw that final piece above. She created them just before Barack Obama was elected, way back in 2008. Remember that? Ah, good times.

via Little Paper Planes blog





summer camp 2 : the first mark

Hey there, Campers! Welcome to week 2 of 15 at AFYE Summer Camp… but before we dive in, I want to show you just a handful of images created by some of you for last week’s art project (hashtagged #AFYEcamp). They were all so good! This was an Instagram-a-Day project, with an assigned prompt for each day. There were HUNDREDS of images taken because, well, you guys are amazing. Here are just a few from each prompt (photo credits at the bottom of this post) :

Day One : Vintage

Day Two : Wood

Day Three : Make

Day Four : Blue

Day Five : Boat

Day Six : Nature

Day Seven : Snacks

 

Love, love, love (and even a little nod to Twin Peaks). If you wanna see what everybody’s doing, or contribute your own work, just use the hashtag #AFYEcamp. Alright, time for today’s episode:

Art Project No.2 

Collaboration-Nation : “Ruining” perfect white paper can be terrifying… so let someone else do it! Ask a friend or family member to make the first mark (their color and medium of choice) on a white page or on that perfect canvas you’ve been avoiding, and then you take it from there! Work around their mark, over it, whatever. ps. I also suggested having more than one piece (and maybe more than one friend making marks) on the go. This idea is thanks to the wonderful advice from this week’s featured artist…

Artist Example: 

Ah yes, Lola Donoghue. She loves working on BWCs (Big White Canvases) which, quite frankly, seems like a nightmare to me. Here is some of Lola’s work, along with a few studio shots so you can see how many big canvases she manages to fit into her lovely studio in the Irish countryside:

Look at all of those glorious happy accidents and creative potholes!

And finally, I promised these images too. Marcel Duchamp as his alter-ego, ‘Rrose’, photographed by Man Ray:

You’re welcome.

Another week of camp done, another s’moreo eaten! Thank you to Saatchi Art for supporting summer camp, and thanks so much to you for listening! AFYE camp continues next weekend… but until then, be sure to hashtag your ‘first mark made by another’ on Instagram with #AFYEcamp. Have fun, and embrace those happy accidents!

Other links:

  1. Your Inner Critic Is A Big Jerk, by me
  2. Secret Lives of Great Artists, by Elizabeth Lunday
  3. Lola Donoghue on AFYE : Episode 50

*Photo credits from Project No.1, in the order they appear above:

Vintage: 1. @septemberwren  2. @caballo_rosa  3. @vanittasr  //  Wood: 1. @catseatdogsmakes  2. @alabamathirteen  3. @cindymcd  //  Make: 1. @celkovich  2. @thejealouscurator  3. @flyonthewall602  //  Blue: 1. @juliehamiltoncreative  2. @mariko_koda  3. @stephillo  //  Boat: 1. @bababeloco  2. @taytayshenaynay  3. @meganwoodardjohnsonart  //  Nature: 1. @neotimes  2. @emilyezarse  3. @tara.axford  //  Snacks: 1. @vanittasr  2. @modernfibre  3. @heathersundquist

 





aimée henny brown

Gasp! “Shelter”, an installation by Canadian artist Aimée Henny Brown. I’m not sure where to start? The mixed media collages, the pink ranger station… that paper cutting!? Ok, I’ve got no words so I’m handing this over to Aimée :

“Exhibited at the Ranger Station Art Gallery for June, 2015,  the work was inspired by my artist residency in the district of Kent, and through access to archives held at the Agassiz-Harrison Museum and Archives.   Through this body of work, I am visually exploring a period in this area’s history where the land was wild, shelter was provisional and industry was just beginning to imagine its place in the Fraser Valley. The re-presentation of these historical moments is also informed by imagined, alternative visions of what the term shelter can represent. In its most essential form, shelter is depicted as a triangle – an icon of sanctuary and dwelling. The triangle motif is employed throughout the work as a talisman to conjure concepts of protection, survival and home – but it is also the essential geometric building block of geodesic domes, tent structures, gabled walls, pitched roofs and signal flags. In this exhibition, the triangle is both form and metaphor. The aim of this work is to glimpse into local histories while discovering the imaginative potential of digging deeply into this past, and closely examining our relationship with place.”

Beautiful. Happy Friday.





jonathan crowther

Flowers and some very odd vases… glue lids, drink spouts, and of course, a soy sauce fish! These are the wonderful paintings {oil on canvas} of Melbourne based painter Jonathan Crowther. I love everything about these – the realism of the flowers, the fact that those flowers are poking out of glue lids, and the flat/colorful abstract backgrounds. Gorgeous. ps. Jonathan has a new show, featuring a different body of work, that just opened today in Sydney {which I guess would be yesterday there?} at Palmer Art Projects. It runs until June 24th, 2017.

And, because seeing scale {and the artist!} is always fun:





victoria reichelt

Oil paintings. What!? Yes. This is the very analog work of Australian artist Victoria Reichelt, and all of these pieces are part of her latest show, titled Precipice,  that opens on June 1st at This Is No Fantasy Gallery in Melbourne {runs until June 24th}. Why hundreds of little stickers and tiny erasers you ask? Well that takes us back to the whole analog thing …

“For this exhibition Reichelt takes ordinary objects and office stationary, strips them of their context and presents them in a fresh tableaux. These items, which were at one time essential to rational organization and workplace efficiencies, are facing redundancy as we turn our backs more and more on the analogue, in favor of the digital.”

Go if you can! In person. Not online ; )





jacqui morgan

Watercolor and burlesque … a dreamy combination! This is the work of American artist Jacqui Morgan. Does her name sound familiar? It might, as she was one of the first women to work as a full time illustrator in the early 1960s… in fact, one of her claims to fame was a poster for New York’s iconic nightclub, Electric Circus! I received an email from her cousin, Barbara, submitting on behalf of Jacqui. She passed away in 2013 and Barbara is lucky enough to have some of these sassy ladies in her home {a significant remainder of Jacqui’s work went to the Norman Rockwell Museum.} Thanks so much to Barbara for reaching out – I love this work, and I love Jacqui’s inspiring story … Read Jacqui’s very full / interesting bio.





nuria riaza

Portraits, ballpoint pen, and embroidery… I could not think of a better way to kick off a Monday. Sigh. This is the work of Spanish artist/illustrator Nuria Riaza. I just discovered her last week via The Sketchbook Project {Brooklyn}… the second I clicked over to her site I went down the rabbit hole and got completely lost in her beautiful navy blue and blush pink world of weirdness. Happy Monday.