fabienne rivory

FabienneRivory

Sigh. These ethereal landscapes are the work of French artist Fabienne Rivory, and part of a series titled Croisées. This isn’t new to Fabienne though… in 2007, she began “exploring interactions between photography and painting. The meeting of these two media allows [her] to create images that are not a faithful reproduction of reality, but retain in them a trace of reality to which is added an interpretation, a subjective layer.” Beautiful.

{Fabienne’s work is available here}





“jellyfish in a trifle”

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I like to imagine that these abstract worlds are made of candy, and are most likely home to a bunch of unicorns. These colorful layers of dots and lines are the work of Kansas based painter Jaime Rovenstine. She is an artist, works full-time at a museum, and is the mother of a beautiful little girl. How does she do that?! Don’t worry, I asked her. You can listen right up there under that explosion of color, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First up, a few of my favorites {acrylic on canvas} from Jaime’s magical portfolio:

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Yum!

Jaime’s studio is in her home, which is great for getting work done. Luckily, she has a little helper in there:

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Gah! How cute is she!? I also really wanted to show a couple of Jaime’s “in progress” pieces. I’d hang these on my wall right this very second… but she’s a “maximalist” so she keeps on going. Fair enough. She’s the pro!

So, we also talked about Jaime’s very busy life. She works at the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, comes home for dinner / bath / books with her family, and then makes her way into the studio {or the couch for Netflix depending on the day}:

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How great is that self-portrait in the reflection on her brush… love! {found on her dreamy Instagram feed}. 

We also talked about the evolution of her work. In college she was already starting down the path she’s on now:

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Similar but they’re definitely deeper and richer now. The piece just above, with the phonograph, is the painting that Columbia College Chicago {the art school she went to} bought when she graduated… it’s also the piece inspired by patterns in the Anthropologie catalog!

And finally… I started this post with a few of my favorites, and I’ll end it with a few more. These are the paintings I was talking about when I brought up her fabulous titles {that we now know are words from the mouth of the very dry/hilarious Karl Pilkington.} These are: “Worry Hole”, “Willy Nilly By the Sea”, and “Jellyfish in a Trifle”:

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See? I’m sure there has to be candy and unicorns in there somewhere. Speaking of unicorns, here’s a link to the weirdest infomercial you’ve ever seen in your entire life. Thanks Jaime, without you I never would have known about the “Squatty Potty”! *Warning: You may never want to eat ice cream again.

Thanks so much to Jaime for taking time out of her busy life to do this with me, thanks to Saatchi Art for continuing to support the podcast, and as always, thanks to you for listening. There will be more art for your ear next weekend!

Other links:

  1. Design Mom interview with Jaime
  2. Art School Confidential {movie}
  3. Nelson Atkins Museum of Art {Jaime’s day job}
  4. Ian Tan Gallery {re: Sarah Gee Miller}
  5. Kirra Jamison
  6. Kerry James Marshall
  7. Alchemy Candles {Jaime’s painting as packaging!}
  8. Land of Nod
  9. And of course, Karl Pilkington {and a ridiculous interview with Ricky Gervais}

 





jeff topham

jefftopham_icebergs

Happy Canada Day to my fellow Canucks… oh look, here’s one now! These stunning photographs, taken in both the Arctic and Antartica, are the work of Vancouver based photographer Jeff Topham. I wrote about him in 2010, when he and his brother {and their cameras} went to Africa to recreate photographs their father had taken when they lived in Liberia during the 1970s. Anyway, all that to say Jeff obviously comes from a very creative family and when I saw the icy/magical results of his latest adventures, well, here we are again! Now, just to be clear his portfolio is not all icebergs {although those are some of my faves as you can tell} – there are also a lot of urban gems like this beauty:

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Sigh. Yes. I hope so. {Text installation in Vancouver by Martin Creed, 2008}

* Jeff has just recently started selling prints, and at the moment they’re only $100 CAD… so get over there right now!





nathan ritterpusch

Nathan_Ritterpusch

Ooh! These gorgeous wobbly portraits are from a series titled, “Old Enough To Be My Mother”, and are the work of American artist Nathan Ritterpusch. I wrote about this series in 2012, and my heart literally just skipped a beat when I saw that he had created new pieces in 2016! LOVE.





jeanne heifetz

jeanneheifetz

Intricate ink drawings on gorgeous dyed paper… all of these pieces are from a series, titled “There Is No Road” by American artist Jeanne Heifetz. I absolutely love her statement about this work:

“… As a child, I was always afraid of making the wrong decision. Selecting from many possible options was torture unless I could find a convincing rationale for my choice, some external justification beyond my own desire. Fear made me superstitious. I enlisted numerology, mythology, arcane patterns of all sorts to confirm the “rightness” of my decisions.

This body of work confronts decision-making head on. Still craving a system, I borrow one from nature: Plateau’s laws, which govern the branching and growth of many natural forms. Within that system, I improvise, lighting out for the territory without a map. Each drawing grows by slow accretion as I allow myself (or force myself) to make hundreds of tiny sequential decisions…”

So. Good. What a beautiful challenge to give herself… as are the results.





hayv kahraman

hayvkahraman

Gorgeous. This is the work of Baghdad-born, San Francisco-based artist Hayv Kahramana. All of these oil on panel pieces are from her 2013 series, Extimacy. I love this quote she gave in a New York Times article about this work:

“Having these women violently detaching their limbs, for me, is very reminiscent of the psyche of a refugee, and that sense of detachment you have from your land that you’ve had to leave behind. That’s the idea of the diasporic women, who are fragmented, or cyborgs almost. They’ve had to give up part of themselves.”

Brilliant, and beautiful.





robert otto epstein

robertottoepstein

Portraits that pop right off the paper they’re painted on! These candy-hued ladies are the work of New York based artist Robert Otto Epstein {who by the way has a degree in political science, and oh yes, also a law degree… hm, I feel like there’s a story there}. This is his latest figurative series… they make me want to call all of my girlfriends so we can wear our watermelon shirts, drink cosmopolitans and argue over who gets to be Carrie / who has to be Miranda?





“take your pleasure seriously”

gunjan1

So, I’m sitting here trying to think of a way to explain what India born, Sydney based paper artist Gunjan Aylawadi does… but in all honesty I really have no idea how she does what she does. Let’s just say there is a lot of paper, woven to look like intricate/patterned tapestries. Yes. She makes paper do this?! But don’t worry, she’s going to tell us how. Listen right up there under that insane “work in progress”, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First up, this is the original she recently sent to me. Mind. Blown…

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Yeah, that’s in my house!? The photographs are fantastic, but I wish I could explain what it looks like in person. So, so, so good.

We talked about her love of geometry {perhaps a holdover from her computer science degree… computer science?!}, and I thought this piece, and the making of this piece, was a beautiful example to show how these perfect geometrics come to life:

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Cra. Zy. Have I mentioned yet that she’s completely self-taught, and in fact, invented this technique? Yes. She did. Again, my mind is blown. And while we’re on that topic, I’ll show you this beauty:

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It’s paper. I dunno. What I find even funnier, is that Gunjan claims she’s “not a very patient person”… UM, what!? She told me that in day-to-day life she is very impatient, but once she found this work, and while she’s immersed in it she becomes another person. She said it feels like someone else takes over, almost like a form of meditation. Here she is in action working on two HUGE “carpet” pieces:

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Yeah. Not very patient. Right.

And now, on to the text pieces we were talking about… love it!

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As if her technique isn’t brilliant enough, Gunjan’s reason for doing these text pieces just adds to the awesome-ness of this work. Such a smarty-pants.

Now, as usual, the speed round produced a few gems. Turns out she refuses to eat Vegemite, but claims to be a huge fan of anything dairy. Well, according to her Instagram feed, she wasn’t kidding:

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Yep! Ice cream from around the world! Paris, Sydney, and Japan {and there are a lot more where these came from!}. If I make it to Sydney next year, I’m so making her take me to wherever that blue ice cream came from! Oh, another speed round tidbit – she would love to show her very analog work in Silicon Valley, so if you’re listening Facebook, Twitter, Google etc… CALL HER.

Ok, thanks so much to Gunjan for sharing her insanely inspiring story with us, thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting the episode, and thanks to you for listening! There will be more art for your ear next weekend. xo

Other links:

  1. Elizabeth Gilbert TED Talk
  2. Japanese Paper Place, Toronto
  3. Broken Hill, Australia
  4. Munga Park, Australia

 





haruka misawa

HarukaMisawa

Oh, yes. Amazing flowers inspired by pencil shavings… but Japanese designer/artist Haruka Misawa went one step further than just being inspired by the pretty petals made by her pencil sharpener. She printed paper with pattern, wound that paper into tight cylindrical scrolls, and then put her sharpener to work… the result… her own unique, one-of-a-kind blossoms. Happy. Friday. Mic drop.

{via Colossal}





nicola kloosterman

nicola_kloosterman

Yes, yes, yes. Strange compositions, beautifully cut found images… it’s work like this that makes me want to drop everything and run to my studio. This is the weird & wonderful work of Netherlands based collage artist Nicola Kloosterman. Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to go and cut up some magazines. Immediately.