dustin yellin

Are you wondering, ” What on earth am I looking at?” That is exactly how I felt last summer when I was lucky enough to see the work of Brooklyn based artist Dustin Yellin in Venice. Well, they are collages within several layers of glass… seriously. A few of his mind-blowing works were part of the Glasstress 2017 show and they were absolutely breathtaking. I’m not sure how many times I walked around each one of them, marveling at the multi-layered, glassy goodness. The detail is insane … hence the many, many close-ups in this post. That said, I know that flat images absolutely do not do Dustin’s work justice, so you have to watch this video to see him in action. It’s from a gorgeous series he did with the New York City Ballet. Beautiful craziness that you have to see to believe. Enjoy…

ps. Speaking of Venice… I’m going back to be one of the instructors at the ECA (European Cultural Academy) during their contemporary art week in June! June 11 – 17th to be exact. There are a limited number of spots for students, so if you’re interested pop over to their site for details. Hope to see you in Venice!





sara khan


Whoa. Ok, clearly I had to include all of those closeups because, well, these details are fantastic! Flowers, figures, narratives… it’s all happening! This is the work of Sara Khan. She was born in England, raised in Pakistan, and now lives in Vancouver… that’s the super quick version of her life story. Now, how about the story behind these beautifully bizarre watercolor paintings from her series titled “Ubiquitous Follies”:

I am interested in the repulsion and beauty found in ordinary spaces and situations, and question the normalcy of the seemingly mundane matters in life. For example; how a man inside a woman leads to the birth of another human; turning the woman into a mound of soil in which a human germinates like a plant from a seed, and in the process disfigures the woman to the limits of possibility.

It is in dealing with these observations that I draw them out, to find a place for things that are neither here nor there. Slowly laying out translucent layers of watercolour, I work toward pronouncing some areas, while covering others entirely, almost decoratively as if to say “you didn’t belong, but now you do, or you did belong and now you don’t.” I leave some questions to chance, answer others more definitively, hovering somewhere between restraint and complete spontaneity. The idea is to develop a space or landscape with both extremes in it; the abhorrent and the fantastic. Coexisting to form one complete picture; thriving in the gray areas, it’s a subtle dance between “is it” and “is it not”. ~ Sara Khan, 2017

Whoa, again.





tracey emin

Ahhh, the passionate and painful ups and downs of love. This is the neon work of British artist Tracey Emin. Her portfolio is full of paintings, drawings, installations, needlework and, of course, these romantic / heart-breaking / hilarious / very personal neon pieces. This is just a teeny teeny tiny snapshot of the neon work she’s created over the years, but I thought they nicely covered the range of emotions from “I forever belong to you” to “Sorry, flowers die” …

“Tracey Emin’s art is one of disclosure, using her life events as inspiration … Emin reveals her hopes, humiliations, failures and successes in candid and, at times, excoriating work that is frequently both tragic and humorous.”

Yes, that they are. Happy Valentine’s Day… or not.





chiaozza chapel

A chapel to celebrate shape and color? I’m in! “Chiaozza Chapel” is the latest work by Chiaozza – the collaborative artistic team of Adam Frezza and Terri Chiao. Oh, and ps. it opens TONIGHT at Cooler Gallery in Brooklyn:

“Historically a chapel is a non-religious place of worship and contemplation; a small, non-conforming annex to common and prevalent modes of spiritual practice. The Chiaozza Chapel, installed within Cooler Gallery, is an intimate sanctuary celebrating color, light, and form. Five painted wooden wall works fill the 6- by 7-foot gallery. The formal compositions reference natural and metaphysical concepts such as horizons, atmosphere, time, landscape, and ritual. Repetitive motifs such as grids, diagonals, and arcs augment the visual vibration of the room.

In Chiaozza’s work, color is a vessel for experience. Matte opaque pigment blurs the presence of the sculpture’s surface and its surroundings, emphasizing the interaction of color and space. Light bounces off the painted wooden planks, creating reflected chambers of color that animate the air around and within each piece.”

Amen! Go tonight … Cooler Gallery, 22 Waverly Ave, Brooklyn 7 ~ 10pm





teagan mclarnan

Ah, yes. Sometimes, usually on Mondays, paintings that exude a sense of quiet calm is exactly what I need. These succulents and cacti are the work of American painter Teagan McLarnan. She usually works with oil paint, but this lovely series has been created with egg tempera. Those muted colors and matte finish make these pieces even more lovely… happy Monday to you. {I need more coffee}





angela deane

Look, the heart wants what the heart wants, ok!? … And yes, my heart desperately wants these insane flowers by American artist Angela Deane. I’ve written about her fabulous ghosts before, and then earlier today I stumbled across that first rose, and well, here we are. Weird, hilarious, and fun … with just a touch of pure ‘Alice in Wonderland-ish’ terror. Happy Friday!





samantha french

Sigh. I have loved the work of Brooklyn based painter Samantha French for YEARS. Now, Sam is known for her large-scale, underwater oil paintings, which I’ve written about several times and even had her on the podcast to talk about. I’m so smitten with her aqua blue pools filled with reflected sunlight,  so I often just pop over to her website to see what she’s up to…  and this time I found these! Smaller works on paper using gouache…. love, love, love! If you’re looking for a more affordable way to add a Samantha French original to your collection, this might be the way. Also… gouache!? ♥

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wayne white : new show

Ok, so, it’s no secret how much I love the work of LA based painter Wayne White, especially his text pieces. Look how brilliant that last painting is?! Those ladies from the original thrift shop painting popping up in front of his gorgeous letters. How? I don’t know. Wayne has a new show opening tomorrow night, titled  I TOOK THE MACHINE APART BUT COULD NOT PUT IT BACK TOGETHER”, at the Joshua Liner Gallery in New York.

The show will be composed of five main components: his signature “word paintings” on vintage offset lithographs, as well as text-based works on paper over the Artist’s painted abstract backgrounds, mixed-media marionettes, and an installation of drawings. The fifth element encompasses the entire gallery, which is painted over with White’s personal doodles, words, and phrases, pulled directly from his notebook. 

Um, that sounds amazing. The opening reception is on Thursday February 8th (6-8pm), oh, and Wayne will be there… ie., GO! ps. The show runs until March 10th.




rochelle redfield

Sigh… I want to take a deep cleansing breath while also jumping for joy! These absolutely gorgeous paintings are the work of American artist Rochelle Redfield. They are all part of her “Confetti Skies” series which are inspired by “Hudson Valley skies and person moments of stormy optimism.” Beautiful.





brenda cablayan

Sigh, I can almost feel the Hawaiian breezes… oh wait, I can! Yep, I’m in Hawaii this week in full-on tourist mode, but oh how I wish I could buy a little pink cottage in the burbs. Alas, I’ll just have to pretend by staring at the work of Oahu based artist Brenda Cablayan. Her paintings might look familiar because I’ve written about her before. I can’t help it! Hawaii is one of my most favorite places on the planet, and there is something absolutely perfect about the way Brenda captures this beautiful spot … not the ‘pina colada’ tourist version, but the ‘regular old day-in-the-life’ version. Granted, it’s a day-in-the-life in paradise, but still.