medium /// installation

art place japan


Can you imagine a place like this? Well you don’t have to, because it’s real:

Every three years, three hundred square miles of land in northwestern Japan are transformed into the most ambitious and largest-scale art installation in the world: the Echigo-Tsumari Art Field. One hundred sixty of the world’s best-known landscape artists, sculptors, and architects create artworks in two hundred villages that dot the mountains and terraced rice fields of the Japanese countryside, with the intent of rediscovering relationships between nature, art, and humanity, forging collaborations between global artists and local communities, and connecting people to each other and the land.

Half a million people make the annual pilgrimage to witness this unique art project. Art Place Japan offers an exhaustive full-color catalog of the eight hundred artworks created during the past fifteen years. For those lucky enough to visit, this book, the first in English on the subject, also offers detailed information on how to visit the often-remote sites, with travel information and a newly commissioned map that locates the projects throughout the Niigata Prefecture.

So there you have it! And if you can’t get yourself there, this lovely new book – Art Place Japan: The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale and the Vision to Reconnect Art and Nature by Fram Kitagawa – can help you at least pretend!


{1. Harumi Yukutake (Japan), Restructure, 2006-ongoing; Image credit: Masanori Ikeda  / 2. Kyota Takahashi (Japan), Gift for Frozen Village, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 ; Image credit: Osamu Nakamura / 3. Antje Gummels (Germany/Japan),
 Traveling Inside, 2009
; Image credit: Isamu Murai   / 4. Chiyoko Todaka (Japan),
 Yamanaka Zutsumi Spiral Works, 2006; Image credit: Hisao Ogose}

Available at: Amazon / Barnes & Noble / PAPress / IndieBound

naomi zouwer


Ah, more organized work that satisfies the over-organizer in me! I wrote about some tiny painted grids last week, and Australian artist Naomi Zouwer saw them on Instagram and thankfully pointed me to her Instagram feed! Little thrift shop finds, beautifully painted and organized into perfect lines? Yes! While on her site, I found another project she is working on… more objects, but for this series, titled “Auditioning Objects”, she paints them, cuts them out, and displays them like a beautifully bizarre shrine to odd objects:



laure devenelle


Ahhh, gorgeous colors and folded paper… this is the delicate work of Paris based set designer and artist Laure Devenelle. She studied at the Sorbonne and during her studies she “discovered a passion for paper.” Yes, I can see that. She makes personal work, but also creates installations for various clients like Guirlain and Louis Vuitton.

jennifer angus


Wallpaper. Made from bugs. A lot of bugs. This is the beautifully buggy, ornately patterned work of American artist Jennifer Angus. Crazy iridescents, bright electric colors, delicate wings… yes, she absolutely shows off these little wonders of nature, but she also wants this to be known about her work: “Part of my work is the rehabilitation of the image of insects — that insects are so vitally important. We need insects to pollinate flowers that, in turn, produce fruit. We need insects for decomposition… “ because without insects, we couldn’t exist. She uses her inventory of bugs {none of which are endangered btw}, over and over again in each of her installations. Creepy? Kinda. Mesmerizing? Definitely. If you want to see them up close and personal, the installation in this hot pink room will be opening on November 13, 2015 at the Renwick Gallery in the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

{quote from Fast Company / images from designboom, photographed by rob blunt}

keith lemley


Wow. This striking installation, titled The Woods, is the work of American artist Keith Lemley. His portfolio is full of beautiful pieces that use light and nature in really interesting ways… but it was these graphic, clean, glowing axes paired with rough, old stumps of wood that took my breath away. Here’s a snippet from his artist statement:

“My work is about seeing the unseen – the invisible presence which exists in our minds and surrounds all objects, experiences, and memories. Working in my studio in rural Appalachia, I have developed a keen interest in being part of and observing natural systems, time and the process of life and death, and an aesthetic sensibility synthesizing the organic and the machine.”

ps. This work is in a show that opens tomorrow, October 10th at Exhibit A in Corning, NY

{via Yellowtrace}

charline giffard


I got chills when I saw this installation, titled “La chambre de Marie” {Marie’s Bedroom}, by Canadian artist Charline Giffard. Her site is in French, but without even reading her artist statement I knew immediately that this work had to be about her grandmother… because everything in this room reminded me exactly of my grandmother, Blanche {who also lived in Quebec!}.  I miss her, and these lovely vignettes brought so many memories rushing back. I can almost smell her powdery perfume on those pink dresses.

rebecca vaughan


Oh. There are so many things I love about this work by American artist Rebecca Vaughan… the color palette {all of those soft pinks are killing me}, the vintage landscape paintings, the ornate shapes, and of course, I need one those sculptural collages. Sigh. They make me want to run into my studio and start attaching stuff to other stuff until the wee hours of the morning.

{Sent to me by another sculptor, Jennifer Pettus}

“equal or lesser value”


Today’s episode is an interview with Vancouver based artist Ben Skinner. Window displays, gold leaf vs. nose breath, scaffolding made from foam core, OCD, and a romantic/artsy story about how Ben met his wife. Yep, we covered it all! You can listen right up there, or you can subscribe on iTunes. Here is what we talked about, in the order that we talked about it. First up, images from his day job as a visual display artist for Aritzia / TNA:


The final shot above is in the Aritzia studio… where the magic happens, and where Ben spends most of his waking hours. These next images are from the very first show that I ever curated, and of course I chose Ben as the artist {Honfleur Gallery, 2011, Washington DC}. This is the show that had Ben’s foam core scaffolding, among all sorts of other amazing pieces:



I wrote several posts that showed Ben’s work in progress leading up to, and then during that show that you can see here, here, here, and finally here. Can you tell it was my first show? So many posts!? Moving on… here are three of his gold leaf pieces… beware the nose breath:


Gorgeous. I love those pieces so much {Gold Leaf, lacquer, glass, mounted to MDF}. Next, the first post I ever wrote on The Jealous Curator was about Ben, and this was the piece {thread and paint on wood} that I wrote about… and now I own it!


Pretty and kinda sassy! Next up… pieces from his show, “COLOURING OUTSIDE AND READING BETWEEN” at Back Gallery Project in 2014 including the reverse paint-by-numbers that almost drove him crazy:


That table. Ah-mazing. Oh, and this next bit is so fantastic! Back where it all began… art from his younger days, in his home town of Petrolia, Ontario. He’s slightly horrified that I’m showing this, but I HAD TO! {and still hoping that his dad can track down the birding magazine cover!}


“Ben’s Pen Exchange” … you’ll have to listen to get the whole story:


Gorgeous wood-burning work by Ben’s very talented wife, Genevieve Dionne {who I have also written about before. Here.}:


And finally, Ben’s two inch cube collection… well, a tiny part of it {ps. if you have access to any two inch cubes, I’m pretty sure Ben would love one!}


Phewf! And that’s that… for now! Thanks to Ben for telling me all of his stories, to Saatchi Art for sponsoring, and to all of you for listening… the next episode will be up next Saturday!

adrian esparza


Sarape blanket, wood, nails, enamel… now that is a fantastic materials list! Texas based artist Adrian Esparza deconstructs and then reconstructs Mexican sarape blankets, viewing them as “an evolving self-portrait.” He transforms them from their traditional, original form into stunning, modern geometric installations poetically exploring the idea of his identity as a Mexican-American growing up on the border of these two cultures. I would love to see this work in person… this is the best I can do today:




{all images via Taubert Contemporary; found via Pattern Pulp}

jim bachor


You’ve got a street full of potholes… what should you do? Call Chicago based artist Jim Bachor and ask him to fill ’em up with ice cream! “Treats in the Streets” is Jim’s latest series, in which he uses the ancient art of marble/glass mosaics to transform damaged roads into works of art… and if filling potholes with ice cream doesn’t scream happy weekend, well I just don’t know what does.

{via Colossal}