medium /// installation




summer camp 3 : unconventional and absurd

Unconventional and absurd? Yep, that pretty much describes my “s’moreo” photo for the day 7 prompt {“snacks”} from the first week of camp {combined with a photo of me, age 6}. And yes, you better believe I have a fresh s’moreo sitting right beside me at this very moment! So, before we get started on week 3 at AFYE Summer Camp, I want to show you just a handful of images created for last week’s art project (hashtagged #AFYEcamp). “Collaboration-Nation”, indeed! I did it too {posted below} by getting my husband and son to each make marks on a scary wooden panel I’ve been nervous to “ruin”… and I love it! Red marks made by my son Charlie, orange marks by my husband / amazing AFYE producer Greg, and the final piece by me:

 

Ahh, finally, that wood panel has paint on it… the title: “The rainbows and candy-colored chaos gave it away – Suzanne was hashtag blessed.”

And, of course, here are just a few of the many, many fabulous pieces you all collaborated on {photo credit links are at the very bottom of the post} :

So fantastic! Speaking of which, let’s get on to this week’s challenge:

Art Project No.3 

Shopping List : Yep, we’re heading to the grocery store for our art supplies this week {feel free to buy ingredients for s’moreos while you’re there!}. Using unconventional, AND CHEAP, materials can help bring back that fun, childlike joy in making. Paper plates, bags of macaroni, lunch bags, plastic bags from the bakery dept, pie tins, potatoes for potato stamps… whatever you can find! And if you want this to be super duper cheap, ie free, just raid your recycle bin!

Artist Examples: 

Here are three artists who don’t use the usual go-to art supplies for their work. First, American artist Hollie Chastain. She uses old book covers in place of canvas:

UK based artist Claire Brewster works with old maps and atlases:

Lydia Ricci uses, well, everything:

And finally, a few images of the absurdity embracing Eva Hesse:

Love!

Ah, another week of camp done… another s’moreo eaten! Thank you to Saatchi Art for supporting summer camp, and thanks so much to you for listening! AFYE camp will be back on Saturday June 17th … until then, be sure to hashtag your unconventional material piece {or pieces!} on Instagram with #AFYEcamp. Have fun!

Other links:

  1. Hollie Chastain on AFYE : Episode 15
  2. Claire Brewster on AFYE : Episode 84
  3. “Eva Hesse” – Documentary by Marcie Begleiter and Karen Shapiro
  4. Book signing at Book Passage Ferry Building, SF (June 9th, 6pm)
  5. Hotbed Benefit 2017
  6. Plant Hope Foundation
  7. Venice! European Cultural Academy
  8. TO SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST: subscribe on iTunes.

*Photo credits from Project No.2, in the order they appear above:

1. @mary_stack // 2. @elisegedig  //  3. @nullsie  //  4. @bababeloco  //  5. @mlestudio





carole feuerman … and venice

Did it take you a moment to realize these weren’t actual swimmers? Yep, me too. This is the absolutely gorgeous work of well known American hyperrealist sculptor Carole A. Feuerman... and I’m actually going to see some of her work in person this August at the Venice Biennale! She has several exhibitions happening at one time in Venice. She’ll be showing work at: Giardino Della Marinaressa, Bel Air Fine Art, Palazzo Mora and Palazzo Bembo –  both palazzo’s will each have a special Feuerman swimmer exhibitions during their shows called Personal Structures, Open Borders. The course that I’ll teaching in Venice {I’m one of several instructors from Aug 7 – 20} is taking place at Palazzo Bembo through the Academy at the European Cultural Centre – here’s hoping one of Carole’s swimmers is close by!

ps. I just found out that there are ONLY SIX SPOTS left at the academy the weeks I’m there. To find out more, visit the ECC’s site. I hope we can see Carole’s work together! Oh, and stay tuned because I’ve got a collage contest coming up with the prize being the tuition for one week at the Academy … worth EUR950! I’ll talk about this more on the podcast this weekend. 





aimée henny brown

Gasp! “Shelter”, an installation by Canadian artist Aimée Henny Brown. I’m not sure where to start? The mixed media collages, the pink ranger station… that paper cutting!? Ok, I’ve got no words so I’m handing this over to Aimée :

“Exhibited at the Ranger Station Art Gallery for June, 2015,  the work was inspired by my artist residency in the district of Kent, and through access to archives held at the Agassiz-Harrison Museum and Archives.   Through this body of work, I am visually exploring a period in this area’s history where the land was wild, shelter was provisional and industry was just beginning to imagine its place in the Fraser Valley. The re-presentation of these historical moments is also informed by imagined, alternative visions of what the term shelter can represent. In its most essential form, shelter is depicted as a triangle – an icon of sanctuary and dwelling. The triangle motif is employed throughout the work as a talisman to conjure concepts of protection, survival and home – but it is also the essential geometric building block of geodesic domes, tent structures, gabled walls, pitched roofs and signal flags. In this exhibition, the triangle is both form and metaphor. The aim of this work is to glimpse into local histories while discovering the imaginative potential of digging deeply into this past, and closely examining our relationship with place.”

Beautiful. Happy Friday.





bigert & bergstrom

I don’t normally write about architecture, but when you come across a golden solar egg sauna in the most northern part of Sweden… then yeah, it’s time to write about architecture! This is the work of architects Bigert & Bergstrom, and is of course, so much more than an egg shaped sauna. Here is the story behind the egg, the town of Kiruna, and the discussion of climate and sustainable community development:

“Kiruna is currently undergoing a radical transformation, which involves a gigantic move for the whole town. This is so that the mining company LKAB can extract more of the iron seam that cuts diagonally downwards beneath the town. The iron ore is and has been – ever since it first began to be extracted at the end of the 19th century – an important source of income for Sweden, and absolutely vital for the town of Kiruna. No mine, no town. But the breaking up and devastating transformation of the landscape, the environment and the architecture caused by the move are also sparking a lot of debate. Solar Egg has been made as a social sculpture where local people and visitors to the town can meet and, for instance, discuss these challenges. In the arctic climate of Lapland the sauna occupies a key position, as a room for warmth and reflection. B&B have taken up this tradition and developed a sculptural symbol that prompts thoughts of rebirth and an incubator that nurtures conversation and exchanges of ideas. The project is a continuation of the artists strategy to incorporate the climate into the experience of the artwork which was initiated with the Climate Chambers in 1994.

The egg is made out of stainless golden mirror sheeting, its multifaceted form breaking up the surroundings that it reflects into a multiplicity of different mirror images. Landscape, mine, town, sky, sun and snow are here combined into a fragmented image that can evoke associations with the complexity spanned by today’s discussion about climate and sustainable community development.”

Truly brilliant.

{via Colossal}





lewis paul miller

Weddings, photoshoots, fancy events … and trash cans! Yes, New York based floral designer Lewis Paul Miller is turning the city’s trash cans into huge vases filled with stunning, colorful, joy-filled bouquets using any flowers that might be leftover after those aforementioned fancy events. Brilliant and beautiful. Here’s why he does it:

“I am in the business of fantasy and flowers, and it’s my job to transform key moments in my clients’ lives into joyful, everlasting memories. I wanted to recreate a similar feeling for the everyday city-dwellers and tourists of New York City.”

Happy Monday.

{via My Modern Met}





claire coles

“A contemporary take on chinoiserie wallpapers, producing unique and luxurious embroideries that transform walls into works of art.” Exactly! Oh my word, this is the gorgeous work of London based artist Claire Coles. Could you imagine having your walls covered in this kind of art? Exotic birds, flowers in full bloom, and elegant embroidery living in perfect harmony! Here is a little blurb about her process, materials etc:

“Claire designs and handcrafts couture wallpaper murals and appliqué artworks. Papers, silks and leathers are collaged and freehand embroidered to create a range of decorative surface patterns inspired by flora and fauna. Claire uses the sewing machine as others would use a pen or a pencil in a loose and fluid way, intricately stitching her motifs together. All designs are handmade in her London studio.”

Sigh. Lovely.





“an opportunistic optimist”

This post is filled to the brim with so much amazing work, AND such an interesting back story! From a dairy farm, to art school, to working in flooded basements to selling huge installations in New York. Yep, Molly Hatch has seen it all. Of course, so has Molly Hatch Studio. That’s right, she has a few lives happening at once. No.1 commercial artist designing ceramics for companies like Anthropologie, The Land of Nod, Target … No.2 Fine artist creating huge, detailed, amazing installation work … No.3 Mother to a sweet six year old girl. I’m not sure when she sleeps, but she claims she does. You can listen right up there under Molly installing one of her ‘plates as paintings’ pieces,  or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First up, a few of her pieces that you might recognize {and that Mick might like, since they’re blue!}

Ahh, the teacup mug. And that vase… I need that vase!

Next, stepping back a tiny bit, these were a few of the pieces in her show at The Clay Studio in Philadelphia a year after completing her MFA {2010}:

Ah, yes… back where it all began!

So during that time there was a lot of hard work, and not a lot of money. I loved this story… not the poor part, but the hard work part… oh, and that very well-timed email she got from Anthropologie. She’s been working with them for years now, and here are a few of my recent faves:

Clearly, I’m going to need that unicorn mug. And the dachshund.

So, from functional pieces that can be found on shelves in lovely stores around the world, to breathtaking installation art that hangs in galleries and museums around the world. This is the piece she was talking about that is permanently installed in the lobby of the High Museum of Art in Atlanta:

Ooh, I would love to see that in person!

Now, If you happen to be in New York you could pop by Todd Merrill Studio, the gallery Molly’s been working with for the last few years. Here are just some of her insane fine art pieces:

 

Right?! Oh my word – so much talent in one person.

And finally, you’ll be happy to know that Molly’s no longer working in a flooded apartment basement {wearing rain boots with her supplies in tubs}, now she works HERE:

What the wha! Gorgeous and so well-deserved. Here’s to being an “opportunistic optimist”, and saying yes to all of the amazing things that come along with that outlook. Thank you so much to Molly for sharing her story – the good, the bad, the hustle, all of it. Thank you as always to Saatchi Art for supporting this episode, and thank YOU for listening. There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Molly Hatch Instagram / Molly Hatch Studio Instagram
  2. RISD
  3. Museum School, Boston
  4. Kathy King, Ceramics 
  5. Miranda Thomas, Pottery
  6. Michael Cardew / Ara Cardu
  7. Rebecca Louise Law episode
  8. University of Colorado 
  9. Betty Woodman
  10. Beth Lipman
  11. Bennington Art Museum
  12. Land of Nod, Molly’s collection
  13. Studio images via Molly’s home tour on Apartment Therapy

 





“greetings from yawnder”

jaydart1

Today we’re taking a little trip into the woods, to a magical place called “Yawnder”. I’m talking to Canadian drawist {that’s an artist who draws}, Jay Dart. You can listen right up there under that bearded log driver, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

I’ve been a fan of Jay’s work for years, but I’m embarrassed to say it wasn’t until his most recent show,  “Greetings From Yawnder”, that I finally began to understand his work, and more importantly, the secret meaning behind it.  The “Field Guide to Yawnder”, a lovely little book that he created for the show, is to thank for this. It’s insightful, insanely detailed, and a true field guide complete with maps, glossaries, definitions and introductions to characters that I want to be friends with… like Jiggs and his trusty dog Floyd, for example. Jiggs is Jay’s muse/alter-ego who travels Yawnder searching for creative inspiration:

jaydart2

I want to go to there. Geist trees growing ideas, “Beyawnder” where you’re free to be as creative as possible, and a land called “The Unknowns” … nobody knows what happens there, obviously. This is the part in the podcast when I made Jay read his own poetry. I love this, especially the bit about the referers:

 

jaydart4

Hilarious and so smart! If you have no idea what this is about, then you haven’t listened to the episode yet. What are you waiting for!?

Next, this is the self-published book, “Wanderer of Yawnder”, that Jay was telling me about. I have a copy and it’s so lovely, magical, and beautifully made:

jaydart3

Note the author: writing credit to Jiggs! LOVE. Speaking of love… magical mystery beards, and branch libraries:

jaydart5

So simple. So Magical. That last framed piece is the branch library that Jay made for my Land of Nod collection.

Oh, the geist trees. The entire idea behind these rainbow-hued beauties is absolutely brilliant:

jaydart6

Sigh. Wouldn’t you love to spend an afternoon in Jay’s mind?

Aaaaand here we are… we’ve arrived in “Beyawnder”. This wonderful, creatively-carefree place is a collaboration between Jay and his little boy. One of them is in charge of scribbles, the other takes care of the wanderers:

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Yep, anything is possible in this wonderful little corner of the map.

Now, we thought we were finished and then I realized I forgot to ask about these fabulous album covers that Jay designed for his friend, and talented Canadian musician, Donovan Woods:

jaydart8

Ah! I love all of them, but that geist tree cut-away?! So, so good.

And finally, in case you want to see his ginger beard, a photo of Jay mid-install at Galerie Youn in Montreal {they were the first gallery to represent his work, and he’s forever grateful.}

jaydart9

I think I see a bit of Jiggs in that photo of Jay, can’t you? Thank you so much to Jay for taking us to Yawnder; Thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting this episode; and you guessed it, big high-fives to you for listening! Now normally I say, “there will be more art for your ear next weekend”, but I’m in Hawaii at the moment and didn’t get organized enough to have an episode ready for next week… but there will be one waiting for you the weekend after that {I promise!}.

Other links:

  1. Galerie Youn, Montreal
  2. University of Guelph
  3. Elspeth Pratt, sculptor/professor
  4. Toronto International Film Festival
  5. “Beautiful Losers” documentary
  6. “Greetings From Yawnder” Show, Art Gallery of Sudbury (Feb 3)
  7. Jay’s next show, Wall Space Gallery, Ottawa (May 5)
  8. Jiggs’ site (yes, Jiggs has his own site)

ps. “Log Driver’s Waltz” for all of you true Canadians out there:





“more love, less fear”

clairebrewster1

I wrote about London based artist Claire Brewster for the first time in early 2009. Yep, I have loved her delicate, intricate, paper-cutting work from the moment I saw it. Since then I’ve written about her several times, always keeping an eye out for what she might be up to next! It was so lovely to finally speak to her in person and to hear her story. From a little girl cutting kittens and saucepans out of magazines at the kitchen table, to a full-time artist using those same {although honed} cutting skills to cover gallery walls with lace-like birds. Listen right up there under that stunning bird and his shadow, or subscribe on iTunes.

Ok, a little taste of what I love about Claire’s work:

clairebrewster2

I mean, come on!? How beautiful are those? All of the old maps? The colors? THAT CUTTING SKILL!? And I’m just getting warmed up. How about these insane shadows, that were basically happy accidents:

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Sigh. Stunning. Speaking of which, her metal pieces:

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Right? Those birds are insane… they look like metal lace.

Now, we talked about commissions and installations, both of which Claire loves doing. Here’s a peek at a few of my favorites – from a hotel lobby, to a gallery, to a corporate office:

clairebrewster5

Magical! If you’d like to work with Claire either in a commercial space, or in your home… call her!

And finally, at the end of our conversation we got a little political. She’s working on a new top secret series, but what she could tell me is the premise, and why she’s feeling compelled to move in a new direction. It is simply, and beautifully, this thought:

clairebrewster6

Yes. Yes we do. Thank you so much to Claire for doing this with me; thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting yet another episode; and of course, thank you so much for listening! There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Carmen Herrera at the Whitney, NYC
  2. OLFA knives
  3. Ian Wallace (Canadian artist I mentioned)
  4. Zadok Ben David (black/colored metal flower installation)
  5. “Cut Up / Cut Out” Show at The Bedford Gallery

 

 





geoffroy mottart

geoffroymottart

Gasp! Flower-bombing!? How do I even begin to explain how happy these beautiful, blooming beards make me. These magical interventions are the work of Brussels based florist / installation artist, Geoffroy Mottart. Here are his words about why he does what he does:

“This project consists in the decoration of statues, somewhat forgotten, which are part of the decor of our parks. A small note of color making a call to passers-by. This idea came to me, because I realized that most people pass by these statues without paying attention. Apart from many of these works, they are testimonies of the past. I believe they are worth seeing, they are part of our cultural heritage! … My job as a florist gives me the opportunity to restore a new life, a new breath of originality to these forgotten statues, which no longer arouse the interest of passers-by while flourishing public places.”

Beautiful.

{via Colossal}