medium /// installation




“a disciplined free spirit”

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A “disciplined free spirit” … that is officially my new life goal! Also, I want to change my name to Bunnie. This was such a funny, inspiring, and yes, cosmic conversation with Los Angeles based artist Bunnie Reiss. I only discovered her work last month, but the moment I did, I knew I had to have her on the podcast! You can listen right under those fabulously “cosmic animal gloves”, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First up, a few magical/cosmic paintings to put you in a Bunnie state of mind:

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Oh. My. Well, that leads perfectly into this next batch of cosmic work. This is the book Bunnie made, titled The Cosmic Child, that we were talking about. It’s absolutely stunning. And cosmic:

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Beautiful! It’s currently sold out (no surprise!), but she’s organizing another run very soon so keep your eye on her shop!

Next, I mentioned that Bunnie seems to really like painting on, well, everything. She agreed. Here’s proof:

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See? We weren’t kidding! Boots, walls, books, and yes, her car.

These next images are so dreamy. This is what she was working on while she was in Paris last month … pastel and quiet and soft:

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Lovely. It’s so cool that the work continues to look like hers, but the palettes and details often change depending on where she’s traveling. And yes, Bunnie travels a lot! {ps. these three images are from her inspiring Instagram feed}

And now, her murals. Of all the things Bunnie paints on, buildings are her favorite. Oh, and if you want her to paint on, or in, your building, CONTACT HER, because she’ll end up doing something like this:

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Love! I included that scaffolding shot because she had talked about gridding out her murals by using the squares of the scaffolding… I’m going to have to trust her on that one, because my brain would not do that. My brain, however, can totally understand squirrels and rabbits eating donuts ♥

And last but not least, her gloves. This is how I first discovered the wonderful world of Bunnie Reiss, so I just had to share them again:

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Gah! I love them so much… so much in fact that included a pair in the upcoming show, PRETTY / PECULIAR, that I co-curated at the Alison Milne Gallery in Toronto! If you’re in Toronto from Dec 1 – Jan 7th you have to go see them in person {ps. Dec 1 opening party info below}

And finally, a meringue-covered result of the not-so-speedy speed round:

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Oh, that photo makes me so happy. Sunshine, laughing, and a GIANT lemon pie in Paris. Ah, oui… c’est parfait. Thank you so much to Bunnie for doing this with me and sharing all of her goosebump-inducing wisdom; thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting yet another episode; thanks to audible.com for making my new book into an audio book – it’s officially available now – and of course, thank YOU so much for listening! There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Bunnie’s shop (ps. A new series of affordable works will be available first weekend of December… including 6 new sets of Cosmic Animal Gloves!)
  2. Margaret Kilgallen video/quote about embracing the imperfect lines
  3. Honfleur Gallery, Washington DC
  4. “Pretty / Peculiar” Show at Alison Milne Gallery, Toronto

      * “Pretty / Peculiar” Opening Dec 1, 7-9pm RSVP: gallery@alisonmilne.com





yayoi kusama

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Not long ago, I was asked to contribute a must-see show in the US for this article. Um, that’s really hard! There are so many amazing shows all over the place… but, I decided to go with one that I would really love to experience. “Infinity Mirrored Room – The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away” by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama at the Broad Museum in LA. It had just opened last time I was in LA but I wasn’t able to go! The cool thing about this installation, other than all of the mirrors and tiny little lights that seem to go on forever, is that you go in by yourself. Yep, no gallery crowds, just you for one magical minute. Note: tickets are FREE but you need to make a separate reservation to see this exhibit.

{Images via 1. Broad Museum 2. Susan Xie 3. happyfamousartists 4. Mike Segar/ Reuters}





rebecca rutstein

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Wow. This is the work of Philadelphia based artist Rebecca Rutstein. She describes her work as “exploring geometric abstraction with a vision inspired by science and scientific data.” Now this is my kind of scientific data! Gorgeous.

ps. I want to sit down in the middle of those metal clouds. Happy Monday.

*Images Courtesy of the Artist and Bridgette Mayer Gallery




“ancient art … and potholes”

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Ancient art meets the mean streets of Chicago… well, the potholes anyway. Artist/designer Jim Bachor and I are talking about his gorgeous mosaic work, his 85 year old lookout, the fact that people are truly awesome, and me possibly dressing up as Jim for Halloween. You can listen right up there under that glass ‘n marble ice cream sandwich, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First up, “THIS IS NOT A POTHOLE anymore”…

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No, it isn’t! It’s an amazing piece of art that I would love to happen upon while out for a walk! Yep, Jim’s ice creams are my faves, of course, and we’ll get back to them in just a moment. But first, here are the portraits of his twin boys (Henry and Ajax), along with two other portraits. If one piece of glass doesn’t transfer, these very detailed faces can end up looking really weird. Luckily all of these beauties worked out just fine…

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Wow. Also, I love that he’s using this ancient technique to make Starbucks cups and cigarettes.

So. This is it. Jim’s very first pothole, naturally titled “POTHOLE”…

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Ah, yes, art born from necessity. If the city won’t fill the pothole in front of your house, just fill it with art!

He said that he was a little bit scared of getting in trouble for the pothole. He had just won a commission to create a mosaic at Thorndale Red Line station on Chicago’s North Side and didn’t want to risk losing it. Thankfully, he didn’t get in any trouble for his pothole-fixing, and the mural project went off without a hitch. Oh, and it’s gorgeous…

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Beautiful.

Speaking of beautiful – good friends are beautiful. Enter Pat, Jim’s friend who emailed everyone… including me! Here’s a little bit of that very supportive email…

… Jim studied the mosaic arts for months in Italy. Now he’s not only selling his own pieces, but he decided to share some of  his “mysterious” work with the public. Me? I’m Pat. Never mind about me. I’m Jim’s friend and Jim is a bit flummoxed by this whole publicity thing. So, grub worm that I am, I took it upon myself to promote my pal.

“Me? I’m Pat. Never mind about me.” Ha! I think I may to put that on a T-shirt!

Ok, up next we really got into the whole pothole thing. What do people hate? Potholes. What do people love? Flowers…

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… and ice cream …

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YES! Oh, I love Jim’s “Treats in the Streets”. That pink and yellow piece just above was the piece he did in Finland. Site-specific ice cream potholes? Fan-freakin-tastic! 

Now, Finland is certainly not the only place he’s filled a pothole or two. The day before we did this interview Jim had been in San Antonio. He’d reached out to his followers there, was pointed to this specific pothole, and while he was there he filled it with a bit of “trash”. As part of his “Pretty Trashy” series he paid homage to San Antonio’s own “Whataburger”. Here he is in action – orange vest, cones, knee pads and all – followed by a few more trashy potholes from the same series…

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Love. So, when Jim isn’t filling potholes with very, very expensive glass tiles, he is creating fine art mosaics that can hang on the wall. Once again, ancient technique and pop culture come crashing together. Here are two pieces from his cereal series…

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Mmmm… insanely detailed glass and marble Cocoa Puffs!

This is the piece he was talking about, from his latest series titled “Fake”, with the tiny plane in the top corner. Again, his combination of old and new is just so perfect…

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That red circle is printed onto the glass that sits over top of the mosaic, bringing your attention to the plane. Graphic. Clever. Beautiful.

And that’s that. Ahhh, I loved that conversation so much! What a talented, smart, funny guy! So how should we leave off? I thought this would be perfect…

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He certainly has. One pothole at a time. Thanks so much to Jim for taking the time to do this with me; thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting this episode; thanks to audible.com for making my new book into an audio book! To preorder a copy for FREE {or to pick up any other book you might want} just use my link: audibletrial.com/JealousCurator. And you guessed it… thank YOU for listening! There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Jim’s store (originals, prints, etc)
  2. Jim’s Instagram … so you can see him in action!
  3. Map to find the potholes

 





raquel rodrigo

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What!? Urban cross-stitching… oh my word. This is the work of Spanish artist/set designer Raquel Rodrigo. Wire mesh and some very colorful rope working together to create lovely gardens on the walls around Madrid. Sigh. Yeah, I need her roses all over the front of my house.

{via Colossal}





courtney mattison

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Oh my. Beautiful and sad all in one glance. This is a glazed stoneware and porcelain installation by American artist/ocean advocate Courtney Mattison, titled “Our Changing Seas III”. Here are her eloquent and inspiring words about this work and her mission:

“This piece explores the rapid transition that corals throughout the tropics and subtropics are making from healthy, colorful and diverse to sickened and bleached as a result of human-caused climate change, which is putting coral reefs into the proverbial “eye of the storm.” At its heart, this piece celebrates my favorite aesthetic aspects of a healthy coral reef surrounded by the sterile white skeletons of bleached corals swirling like the rotating winds of a cyclone. There is still time for corals to recover even from the point of bleaching if we act quickly to decrease the threats we impose. Perhaps if my work can influence viewers to appreciate the fragile beauty of our endangered coral reef ecosystems, we will act more wholeheartedly to help them recover and even thrive.”

Beautiful.

{Thanks to Mariela Di Nardo for pointing me to this work.}





“don’t discount small opportunities”

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So, my plan had been to title this episode, “Reimagining Natural History”, which is the way Melbourne based artist Kate Rohde describes her work {as you can see from that fantastical blue display case up there} … but we just had so many great bits of conversation around the idea of just ‘saying yes and figuring it out later’ that I just had to kick things off with that thought! I wrote about Kate a few weeks ago, but last week’s guest, Sandra Eterovic, told me I had to reach out to Kate. So I did. And she said YES. Now, she’s not alone on this call. Her four month old baby boy was along for the ride! So sweet. You can listen right up there, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

Let’s start off with a few of my candy-colored favorites from my recent post about Kate:

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Yes! Remember those? So good.

Next, here’s an installation, titled “Chateau Fatale” from 2005 that truly does “reimagine natural history”. I would happily spend the day in this super weird museum:

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Fantastic! {Photos by Harry Fatouros}. Now, speaking of fantastic, I quickly mentioned Kate’s pieces under glass … mainly so that I had an excuse to put these images in the post:

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That is a whole lot of colorful craziness… very different than the “brown and green” Australian landscape that Kate grew up in.

Up next, an insane collaboration with Australian fashion label Romance Was Born. They created custom textiles using collaged images of Kate’s work, and she made bizarrely beautiful resin accessories {yes, including horns}. This collection is called “Renaissance Dinosaur”, which might be the best name I’ve ever heard in my entire life:

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Oh. My word. It’s like a crazy dream that I wish I could have every night. This project led Kate to making more jewelry… candy-hued, translucent, chunky jewelry that I would have a really hard time not licking:

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Sigh. Stunning. ps. You can find Kate’s jewelry at Pieces of Eight, which also happens to be where I found these images.

One of my favorite bits of this episode was when we talked about lulls. Oh, lulls. You’d think they’d be a nice time to rest and recharge, but because we can’t predict the future lulls can feel more like THE END. Good news… they’re not. Not as long as you keep making stuff. During Kate’s lull she made vases. They don’t look like a lull to me! Now, we didn’t actually talk about this collaboration, but it’s just so beautiful I had to include it:

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Now THAT is how you show off vases! Kate collaborated on this shoot with Melanie Stapleton from a floral studio in Melbourne called Cecilia Fox {that’s Melanie on the left, and Kate getting things just so on the right}. GORGEOUS! 

And finally, Kate in her home studio. She lives upstairs and works downstairs:

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Love it… and of course, I love that chunky bracelet! Thank you to Kate for taking time to do this with us, and HUGE thanks to Tristan for letting me distract his mama for almost an hour. He did so well  ♥ Thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting this episode, and thanks to audible.com for making my new book into an audio book! To preorder a copy for FREE {or to pick up any other book you might want} just use my link: audibletrial.com/JealousCurator. Finally, and as always, THANK YOU for listening. There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Sandra Eterovic episode
  2. Kate’s work on SaatchiArt
  3. National Gallery of Victoria
  4. Romance Was Born Collab.
  5. Kate’s upcoming show, “Luminous Realms” at Craft Gallery, Dec 9 – Feb 2017
  6. Kate in her studio: Photo by Tobias Titz

 





olek

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Yes, if I had orchestrated these projects I’d be dancing around in circles too! Yes, projects with an ‘S’. We’re looking at not one, but TWO houses completely covered in hot pink crochet. Um, when can I move in!? This is the absolutely beautiful work of Polish-born, New York based artist Olek. The first house is in Avesta, Sweden {first house in the post}, and there is another one in Kerava, Finland {second in the post}. These interventions aren’t just beautiful though, they’re incredibly important. Here are Olek’s words about this project, and the many people who helped make it happen:

“Our pink house is about the journey, not just about the artwork itself.  It’s about us coming together as a community.  It’s about helping each other … we proved that we are stronger together, that we can make anything happen together.  People from all walks of life came together to make this project possible.  Someone donated the house, another one fixed the electricity and @redheartyarns generously donated the materials.  And of course, most importantly, many women {including Syrian and Ukrainian refugees} joined us in the effort to make my dream a reality.

… Women have the ability to recreate themselves.  No matter how low life might bring us, we can get back on our feet and start anew… We can show everybody that women can build houses, women can make homes.  In 2015 over 21 million people lost their homes due to war and conflicts in their native countries. The pink house, our pink house, is a symbol of a bright future filled with hope.  Everybody should have a home.”

Yes, yes they should 

{via Colossal}





leonie barton

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Ok, I may have gotten a little out of control with this post… but I dare you to visit the site and/or Instagram feed of Australia based artist Leonie Barton and NOT get completely lost in her work. I’ve been following this daily series for quite a while and thought that the last day of August might just be the perfect time to write about these nature-inspired beauties. Can you imagine strolling along the beach to find one of these? Sticks, shells, bits of plastic, rusty bottle caps – turned from beach debris into beautifully composed art pieces. Here are Leonie’s words about this body of work:

“The current ephemeral works and sculpture in the galleries are a continuation and a variation on, a years long daily discipline of creating an artwork regardless of circumstance, weather or location and using only materials from the ground, found in the moment… left behind for others to experience.”

Gorgeous. See you in September.

{Any work on her site can be ordered as a print. Just reach out to her at: leonie@leoniebarton.com}





“painting with flowers”

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Oh my WORD. I’m pinching myself over this episode. I absolutely love the work of London based installation artist Rebecca Louise Law. I’ve written about her before, but I was so excited to finally talk to her in person. I wanted to find out where her story began, if she’s afraid of heights, and why she’s obsessed with hanging thousands of flowers from ceilings all over the world. Actually, I’m kind of obsessed with her hanging thousands of flowers from ceilings all over the world too. You can listen under those flowers hanging in London’s “The Garden Museum”,  or you can subscribe on iTunes.

Let’s start with these beauties… they are the first installations of Rebecca’s that I ever saw {aka when my obsession began}:

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Right? Well things got a lot bigger from there. More wire, more height, and of course, MORE FLOWERS. Here are a few random shots of awesomeness, including Rebecca in action:

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Can you even imagine standing under these suspended gardens? Can you imagine wiring and hanging all of these suspended gardens?!

We didn’t actually talk about this installation, at Bikini Berlin, but I had to include it:

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Wow. {photos via Bikini Berlin}

I’m pretty sure we touched on this installation for a few seconds, so I think that’s enough for me to include these gorgeous photos! The show is titled “The Beauty of Decay” … it just came down yesterday {sorry!} in San Francisco:

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Oh, so dreamy. I love the photos of the work, but I have to say, I love the photos of Rebecca in action just as much. I’d be thrilled to watch her install one of these stunning gardens someday. {photos via Chandran Gallery, San Francisco}

Ok, this is the big beautiful crazy piece we talked about the most! “The Canopy”, a permanent installation in Melbourne… that used over 100,000 flowers!

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Yes! And also, NO… I could not get myself up that high, hence asking her about a possible fear of heights during the speed/get to know you round! That’s also where I found out which flower she would use if she were only ever allowed to use one flower from now on. After careful thought, Rebecca chose…

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Helichrysum aka straw flowers. Excellent choice. Oh, that was really, really fun… and mark my words, she is headed straight for the art history books! Thank you so much to Rebecca for fitting me into her insanely busy / flower-filled schedule, thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting this episode, a new thank you to audible.com for making my new book into an audio book – and for letting me NARRATE?! To preorder a copy of the audio book FOR FREE, along with a 30 day free trial at Audible, you can use my fancy link: audibletrial.com/JealousCurator

And you know what comes next … a BIG thanks to you for listening. There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

ps. Artists need to know math. Stay in school, kids! ; )