medium /// installation




charline giffard

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I got chills when I saw this installation, titled “La chambre de Marie” {Marie’s Bedroom}, by Canadian artist Charline Giffard. Her site is in French, but without even reading her artist statement I knew immediately that this work had to be about her grandmother… because everything in this room reminded me exactly of my grandmother, Blanche {who also lived in Quebec!}.  I miss her, and these lovely vignettes brought so many memories rushing back. I can almost smell her powdery perfume on those pink dresses.





rebecca vaughan

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Oh. There are so many things I love about this work by American artist Rebecca Vaughan… the color palette {all of those soft pinks are killing me}, the vintage landscape paintings, the ornate shapes, and of course, I need one those sculptural collages. Sigh. They make me want to run into my studio and start attaching stuff to other stuff until the wee hours of the morning.

{Sent to me by another sculptor, Jennifer Pettus}





“equal or lesser value”

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Today’s episode is an interview with Vancouver based artist Ben Skinner. Window displays, gold leaf vs. nose breath, scaffolding made from foam core, OCD, and a romantic/artsy story about how Ben met his wife. Yep, we covered it all! You can listen right up there, or you can subscribe on iTunes. Here is what we talked about, in the order that we talked about it. First up, images from his day job as a visual display artist for Aritzia / TNA:

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The final shot above is in the Aritzia studio… where the magic happens, and where Ben spends most of his waking hours. These next images are from the very first show that I ever curated, and of course I chose Ben as the artist {Honfleur Gallery, 2011, Washington DC}. This is the show that had Ben’s foam core scaffolding, among all sorts of other amazing pieces:

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I wrote several posts that showed Ben’s work in progress leading up to, and then during that show that you can see here, here, here, and finally here. Can you tell it was my first show? So many posts!? Moving on… here are three of his gold leaf pieces… beware the nose breath:

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Gorgeous. I love those pieces so much {Gold Leaf, lacquer, glass, mounted to MDF}. Next, the first post I ever wrote on The Jealous Curator was about Ben, and this was the piece {thread and paint on wood} that I wrote about… and now I own it!

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Pretty and kinda sassy! Next up… pieces from his show, “COLOURING OUTSIDE AND READING BETWEEN” at Back Gallery Project in 2014 including the reverse paint-by-numbers that almost drove him crazy:

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That table. Ah-mazing. Oh, and this next bit is so fantastic! Back where it all began… art from his younger days, in his home town of Petrolia, Ontario. He’s slightly horrified that I’m showing this, but I HAD TO! {and still hoping that his dad can track down the birding magazine cover!}

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“Ben’s Pen Exchange” … you’ll have to listen to get the whole story:

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Gorgeous wood-burning work by Ben’s very talented wife, Genevieve Dionne {who I have also written about before. Here.}:

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And finally, Ben’s two inch cube collection… well, a tiny part of it {ps. if you have access to any two inch cubes, I’m pretty sure Ben would love one!}

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Phewf! And that’s that… for now! Thanks to Ben for telling me all of his stories, to Saatchi Art for sponsoring, and to all of you for listening… the next episode will be up next Saturday!





adrian esparza

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Sarape blanket, wood, nails, enamel… now that is a fantastic materials list! Texas based artist Adrian Esparza deconstructs and then reconstructs Mexican sarape blankets, viewing them as “an evolving self-portrait.” He transforms them from their traditional, original form into stunning, modern geometric installations poetically exploring the idea of his identity as a Mexican-American growing up on the border of these two cultures. I would love to see this work in person… this is the best I can do today:

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Stunning.

{all images via Taubert Contemporary; found via Pattern Pulp}





jim bachor

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You’ve got a street full of potholes… what should you do? Call Chicago based artist Jim Bachor and ask him to fill ’em up with ice cream! “Treats in the Streets” is Jim’s latest series, in which he uses the ancient art of marble/glass mosaics to transform damaged roads into works of art… and if filling potholes with ice cream doesn’t scream happy weekend, well I just don’t know what does.

{via Colossal}

 





ana teresa barboza

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I wrote about Peruvian artist Ana Teresa Barboza in 2013, and today I came across her series titled “Weaving the Moment”… obviously I had to write again. I have a major weakness for work that blurs the line between fine art and craft, and this my friends is a perfect example of that blurry line! I can’t get enough of the tangled embroidered roots dangling from the bottom of her canvases, and that crocheted water spilling from it’s wooden tap… oh my… so, so good!

*installation photos taken by Edi Hirose at Wu Galeria




ana beltrá

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It probably won’t be surprising if I tell you that Spanish artist Ana Beltrá has just spent a significant amount of time exploring the jungles of Borneo, right? All of these gorgeous pieces are from her latest series, titled “Conjugar Jungla”, clearly inspired by her travels. The electric colors, the layers and movement in her sculptural collages… ahh, it’s almost like being in the jungle {without the snakes and spiders and stuff. Yep, I prefer jungle art to actual jungles I think.}





lisa waud (flower house detroit)

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Oh. My. Have you seen this yet? I just stumbled across, The Flower House, a stunning project by Detroit based flower designer Lisa Waud. Here’s the deal – she bought two totally run-down, abandoned houses in Detroit for $500, and then filled the first one with thousands of flowers bringing new, colorful life into this forgotten home if only for a moment. The photos are stunning, but this video {created for her indiegogo campaign to help fill the second house this coming October, then responsibly tear these structures down, and turn the cleared land into a flower farm!} gave me goosebumps. So nostalgic, inspiring, beautiful…

Flower House Teaser from Hello Future Films on Vimeo. Photos by Heather Saunders.

{via My Modern Met}





pip & pop

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Oh, thank goodness… she’s still at it! I wrote about Australian artist Tanya Schultz, aka Pip & Pop, waaaay back in 2010, so I was thrilled to see that she’s still creating her magical, sugary, glittery, rainbow-filled worlds! I would love to spend an afternoon in the middle of this insane dream. So many colors. So many special details… pastel sugar lakes, shiny little beads, weird plastic flowers, and that pink polka-dot horse. Yep, I’m gonna need that pink polka-dot horse.





rebecca louise law

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Oh my. I would love to stand underneath, and inside of, any one of these stunning floral installations by British artist Rebecca Louise Law. Literally thousands of flowers, both fresh and dried, connected by copper wire and strategically hung from various ceilings around the world! Why flowers? Her explanation is almost as lovely as the work itself:

“Rebecca traces her decision to be an artist back to a defining moment in her life. The day her dad hurried the family out to have a look at a field of daisies: “it was incredible, thousands of flowers as far as the eye could see, since then I’ve wondered how it would be possible to recreate that moment for others to enjoy.” Then while studying fine art at university, she replaced paint with flowers.”

Love.