medium /// installation




tracey emin

Ahhh, the passionate and painful ups and downs of love. This is the neon work of British artist Tracey Emin. Her portfolio is full of paintings, drawings, installations, needlework and, of course, these romantic / heart-breaking / hilarious / very personal neon pieces. This is just a teeny teeny tiny snapshot of the neon work she’s created over the years, but I thought they nicely covered the range of emotions from “I forever belong to you” to “Sorry, flowers die” …

“Tracey Emin’s art is one of disclosure, using her life events as inspiration … Emin reveals her hopes, humiliations, failures and successes in candid and, at times, excoriating work that is frequently both tragic and humorous.”

Yes, that they are. Happy Valentine’s Day… or not.





chiaozza chapel

A chapel to celebrate shape and color? I’m in! “Chiaozza Chapel” is the latest work by Chiaozza – the collaborative artistic team of Adam Frezza and Terri Chiao. Oh, and ps. it opens TONIGHT at Cooler Gallery in Brooklyn:

“Historically a chapel is a non-religious place of worship and contemplation; a small, non-conforming annex to common and prevalent modes of spiritual practice. The Chiaozza Chapel, installed within Cooler Gallery, is an intimate sanctuary celebrating color, light, and form. Five painted wooden wall works fill the 6- by 7-foot gallery. The formal compositions reference natural and metaphysical concepts such as horizons, atmosphere, time, landscape, and ritual. Repetitive motifs such as grids, diagonals, and arcs augment the visual vibration of the room.

In Chiaozza’s work, color is a vessel for experience. Matte opaque pigment blurs the presence of the sculpture’s surface and its surroundings, emphasizing the interaction of color and space. Light bounces off the painted wooden planks, creating reflected chambers of color that animate the air around and within each piece.”

Amen! Go tonight … Cooler Gallery, 22 Waverly Ave, Brooklyn 7 ~ 10pm





amy joy watson

Oh my goodness, yes. This is an installation by Australian artist Amy Joy Watson. I’ve written about her sculptures twice before {2014, 2011} but I just came across this public installation … and yes, I love it! Plywood, acrylic paint, colored rope, and stainless steel cables come together to create“Celestial Bodies”. Gorgeous! This work is now a permanent public artwork at the Australian Catholic University in the Daniel Mannix Building, Melbourne. Stunning.

*Photos by Lisbeth Grosmann




jenny fine

These two photographs inspired a colorful, dreamy, David Lynch-ish traveling performance piece by American artist Jenny Fine. I wrote about Jenny’s series, titled “The Saddest Day” a few years ago – a heartbreaking project she did with her dear grandmother, Sarah, shortly before her death. Almost all of Jenny’s work is an homage to her Granny, and the beautiful dedication continues! May I present Flat Granny and Me: A Procession in My Mind:

“Intertwining the historic narrative surrounding the plight of my South Alabama farming community at the hands of the Mexican Boll Weevil with the memory-scape of my grandmother riding in the annual Boll Weevil Parade as 1968 Woman of the Year; past meets present, reality and memory collide placing the viewer in a dream-like setting and state. Part cyclorama/part moving image, A Procession… was created in an attempt to “reverse the camera’s crop” – returning space and time to the still image; and doing so, attempts to redefine the form and function of the photograph in our contemporary, image-saturated world.” 

So beautiful. And that’s “Flat Granny” above — a life-size photographic cutout of her grandmother turned costume. A full video of this dreamlike performance piece can be seen on Jenny’s site. There are also gorgeous behind-the-scenes photos that go into detail about the gorgeous costumes, lighting, etc.  It’s all just so weird and beautiful.





adela andea

If these light installations don’t scream “Happy New Year”, well, I don’t know what does! These light-filled beauties are the work of Romania-born, Texas-based artist Adela Andea. Explosions of color, neon tentacles and wiggly lines of pure joy! Here is an inspiring little snippet of Adela’s artist statement to send you off into the new year:

“The numerous transitions in my life made me think about the enormous capability of people to adapt to situations and even more, search for the new possibilities of personal development through inquisitive experiences.”

Happy 2018!!!





new spring by studio SWINE

Ok, I was already experiencing some serious FOMO about not being at Art Basel Miami this weekend… and then I found about this interactive piece showing at The Temple House. “New Spring”, by Studio SWINE (Super Wide Interdisciplinary New Explorers : a collaboration between Japanese Architect Azusa Murakami and British Artist Alexander Groves). Delicate blossom bubbles, filled with floral-scented mist, fall gently from a white, chandelier-like tree. The bubbles pop on contact… unless of course you’re wearing the special gloves provided. Seriously, watch this video and tell me you’re not knee-deep in FOMO too:

Video found via Golem13





sheila hicks

Oh my word. This stunning fiber based installation was one of my favorite things at the Venice Biennale this past summer, and yes, it probably has something to do with my current obsession with pom poms. Granted, these are not pom poms at all. They are “pigmented acrylic fibre” wrangled into large soft orbs with some kind of synthetic netting! This gorgeous piece {that you were NOT allowed to jump on even if you really wanted to} was part of the “Color Pavilion” at the Arsenale, and is the work of American-born, Paris based artist Sheila Hicks. Watch the video above to see Sheila talking about this piece… so beautiful on so many levels.

ps. a bit of proof, basically to remind myself that I really was there – because sometimes it feels more like a crazy dream.





francesca pasquali

“Hot Straws” Red, pink and violet straws on wooden panel and metallic frame; “Too Late” colored silicone bracelets on wooden panel and metallic frame; “Spiderballs” blue, red, yellow, fuschia, and gray plastic cobweb dusters, steel cables and metallic nets… whoa. When this is your art supply shopping list, you know something magical is about to happen. And, if you can believe it, these fantastical works are just the tip of the creative iceberg when it comes to the portfolio of Italian artist Francesca Pasquali. Love, love, love!





desire obtain cherish aka jonathan paul

Mmmmm, sticky. Oh how I love these huge, melty lollipops by LA based artist Desire Obtain Cherish (DOC), aka Jonathan Paul. So, obviously giant, shiny, colorful candy art is lovely to look at, but the story behind this “Cherry Meltdown” is even better. This is an excerpt from an interview DOC did with Artsy:

“The idea for the series came to me after I had dinner with a friend years ago. She told me she was breaking up with her boyfriend. I asked what was wrong, and she said, “Nothing’s wrong, I’m just kind of bored. Onto the next!” Many people look a the sculptures of my Blow Pops and feel that I make art about candy. The truth is, I make art about us. If you look carefully, it’s a sculpture of a perfect candy discarded, in fact, barely even tasted. Almost brand new, just melting in the sunlight. Simply discarded, as if our attention span was that of a child’s.”

Love it! Oh look, an excuse to show the scale of this 9 foot blow-pop one more time… here it is standing proudly beside the Grand Canal at the 2015 Venice Biennale:

Si, si, si!

*Venice images via UNIX Gallery, NY.





janet echelman

Gasp! Imagine walking through London, turning a corner and seeing this?! This insane floating net, titled “1.8” is the work of American artist Janet Echelman. In 2016 this beauty was hung in the middle of Oxford Circus, the busiest pedestrian area in all of London. This was its world premiere, opening Lumiere London {light festival}, but now it will continue to travel the world being shown in other cities. Ok, back to that title. Why “1.8” …

“The work’s title is 1.8, referring to the length of time in microseconds that the earth’s day was shortened as a result of a single physical event, the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that emanated from Japan. The sculpture’s form was inspired by data sets of the tsunami’s wave heights rippling across the entire Pacific Ocean. The artwork delves into content related to our complex interdependencies with larger cycles of time and our physical world. The sculpture’s net structure is a physical manifestation of interconnectedness – when any one element moves, every other element is affected.”

Chills.

ps. Janet is one of the artists featured in my upcoming book! Could I be more thrilled? NO.