medium /// sculpture




donald martiny

Polymer and dispersed pigment on aluminum … aka GIGANTIC / JUICY brushstrokes that float on the wall! Sigh. I’ve written about the work of American artist Donald Martiny before, but it only takes one sighting on Instagram for my heart to start racing again…. and voila, moments later, there’s another post written! I use thick strokes of paint in my collages too, but damn, I wish I thought of this. Gorgeous, tactile, HUGE.





claudia fontes

Absolutely magical work that I really want to touch, but I won’t. Maybe. This is the work of sculptor Claudia Fontes … she was born in Argentina, but has been living in London for the past decade. Wait, this is starting to sound familiar … hold the phone … she’s the artist who created the insane sculpture, titled “The Horse Problem”, for the Argentina Pavilion at the Venice Biennale last summer! This was my favorite installation at the Arsenale. It was truly breathtaking… the work, the space, the grandeur of it all:

Stun. Ning.

ps. I’m heading back to Venice this June (11th – 16th) to be one of several instructors during the “Contemporary Art Week” at the European Cultural Academy. There are handful of spots left, so sign up soon if you’re interested!





sylvie fleury

Gasp! Giant makeup? Yes, except that they’re paintings {acrylic paint on shaped canvas}. I don’t know about you, but I could lose several hours just browsing the shelves of a makeup shop – the colors, shapes, palettes, glittery, matte, neutrals, neons and the list goes on. It’s like an art supply shop… for your face. Well, Geneva based multi-disciplinary artist Sylvie Fleury has taken this one giant step further:

Fleury has long been interested in the way the makeup industry discards the “new,” mere months after a long and extensive research process into textures, colors, and names. The attributes the cosmetics industry takes into consideration when developing a product, Fleury argues, are not dissimilar to those an artist may consider when creating a new body of work. But while makeup is wiped clean nightly, art is meant to exist for eternity. {via Contemporary Art Daily}

Brilliant. ps. That’s Sylvie with two of her pieces at Salon 94 in New York.





troy simmons

Concrete. Acrylic. Aluminum. Whoa. This is the grey & rough / colorful & perfect work of Miami based artist Troy Simmons. With a background in architecture, the inspiration for this work makes complete sense:

The inspiration behind his latest series evolved after a recent trip to Germany. He spent time exploring (Architect) Rainer Disse’s Feldberg Church, in Baden-Württemberg located in the southern part of the country. The postwar Brutalist Architecture is a fragmentation of Germany’s traditional heritage mixed with simple modern geometric construction.

And, of course, Troy with one of his pieces so you can see the scale of these very heavy, concrete beauties:





ann carrington

No, your eyes aren’t playing tricks on you… those are bouquets of roses, tulips, and peonies made with silverware! My forks and spoons are just thrown in a drawer, but British artist Ann Carrington makes magic with ordinary, everyday objects. I wrote about her “Pearly Queens” a few years ago, but this being Easter weekend, and the first weekend in April, these “blooms” were the only way to go. Happy Monday.

ps. Ann is one of the 45 contemporary artists featured in my new book, “A Big Important Art Book – Now with Women”. I am beyond thrilled to have Ann’s story and work included! The book will hit shelves worldwide on October 2nd, but you can preorder now… you know, if you wanna : )  





jaynie crimmins

Does your junk mail look like this?! Nope, neither does mine! These gorgeous, textured, papery sculptures are the work of Brooklyn based artist Jaynie Crimmins. Here is how and why she does what she does:

“My medium is the proliferation of promotional mailings from government representatives, non-profit and political organizations in addition to consumerist advertising and bills.  I shred these mailings to generate elements that are uniform in size, assigning equal importance to all the shreds. I then subject them to a rigorous practice of separating colors, rolling or sewing the shreds and commingling specific mailings. 

The fragments, past the point of re-assemblage, still reveal bits of text, imagery, envelopes, and colors; traces of their cultural origins.  Once a means of direct communication, my manipulation of these materials obscure their messages to promote my own.”  

Brilliant. And, clearly, I have to finish the post with an image of Jaynie in action:

Craziness. Happy Friday.





erin vincent

“Wall Forms” by Canadian artist Erin Vincent… and yes, I want all of these forms on my wall!  I love that some of these pieces look like they’re floating, especially considering the materials list: sand, acrylic, foam, wood, tar paper, wire, and it goes on from there! Happy Monday.





lorna simpson

Gasp! Just when I thought I couldn’t love the work of American artist Lorna Simpson anymore than I already do… “Unanswerable”. This is just a tiny peek at her latest work, all of which is currently hanging at Hauser & Wirth in London. I have loved Lorna’s collages for years, but these large scale, deep blue, smokey mixed media paintings are new, AND AMAZING. Here is a little bit of the show description from the Hauser & Wirth site that starts to explain the colors, ice, smoke etc…

“… In the last few years Simpson has taken up the medium painting for the first time in two decades, creating works using hazy washes of ink and acrylic over gesso. In works, such as ‘Ice 4’ (2018), Simpson layers the appropriated imagery and Associated Press photographs of ice, glaciers and smoke with nebulous washes of saturated ink which partially obscure the source material. The smoke plumes signal upheaval and discord in nature and society in reference, perhaps, to images of riots following police brutality past and present that Simpson has more explicitly illustrated in other related works. Barely discernable strips of newsprint typography allude to wider issues in society. Here, as elsewhere, the artist is sparing with colour; her disciplined palette consists of inky blacks, greys, and a startling acid blue that has only recently appeared in her oeuvre, contributing to its atmosphere of bristling movement. Deftly navigating the territory between figuration and abstraction, these paintings cut through the calculated glamour of magazine imagery with the brute force of the natural world. As the artist explains, ‘Conceptually, this is in tandem with what I’m experiencing emotionally but also what I feel is going on politically: the idea of being relentlessly consumed.’”

The show will be up until April 28th, 2018. GO.





sonya clark

Sugar flowers and cotton pods ; gold rings and sugar ; handmade bagasse paper ; sterling silver rings, cotton, hair and cast sugar ; money and sugar. Oh my goodness, these sugar pieces by American artist Sonya Clark are beautiful and, oh, so brilliant. Here are some of Sonya’s words about this work:

“In 1870 my African great grandmother married my Scottish great grandfather and began a family in Jamaica at a time when sugarcane was more valuable than the people who cultivated the cash crop. As my forebears negotiated race and commodity in this hemisphere, across the ocean European gentry flaunted sugar-rotted teeth as the status symbol their slave trade wealth. Generations later in my family that ranges in every skin shade and hair texture, an aunt defined race this way: “You cannot tell if someone is black by skin color but by hair texture.”  Her tangled race construction was explained to me as she was braiding the legacy of sugarcane production onto my head.  She, like most Jamaicans, referred to my hairdo, as canerows not cornrows.  …  Some objects presented here are subtle … others are more overt: gold and silver rings set with sugar “diamonds”, cotton, and human hair or an unraveled Confederate battle flag that somehow remains intact despite being deconstructed. Some are visceral: edible cotton flowers made from sugar, images of brown sugar that call the tongue and reflect the viewer, and Lincoln encrusted in rock candy five-dollar bill.”

Love! Sonya’s site is filled with all sorts of amazingness, so pop over and have a closer look.





joana vasconcelos

‘Prolific’ does not even begin to describe Paris born, Lisbon based artist Joana Vasconcelos. She’s been making work since the 90’s, so choosing what to feature was tricky. That said, I love these crazy sculptures. You can see the joy in every single one of them! So much color, attention to detail, gorgeous composition, and her materials lists – well – that’s just something else altogether. The last piece featured here is titled “Kilimanjaro” and the description reads as follows: Stainless steel sink, handmade woolen crochet, ornaments, polyester  ♥

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