medium /// sculpture

art place japan


Can you imagine a place like this? Well you don’t have to, because it’s real:

Every three years, three hundred square miles of land in northwestern Japan are transformed into the most ambitious and largest-scale art installation in the world: the Echigo-Tsumari Art Field. One hundred sixty of the world’s best-known landscape artists, sculptors, and architects create artworks in two hundred villages that dot the mountains and terraced rice fields of the Japanese countryside, with the intent of rediscovering relationships between nature, art, and humanity, forging collaborations between global artists and local communities, and connecting people to each other and the land.

Half a million people make the annual pilgrimage to witness this unique art project. Art Place Japan offers an exhaustive full-color catalog of the eight hundred artworks created during the past fifteen years. For those lucky enough to visit, this book, the first in English on the subject, also offers detailed information on how to visit the often-remote sites, with travel information and a newly commissioned map that locates the projects throughout the Niigata Prefecture.

So there you have it! And if you can’t get yourself there, this lovely new book – Art Place Japan: The Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale and the Vision to Reconnect Art and Nature by Fram Kitagawa – can help you at least pretend!


{1. Harumi Yukutake (Japan), Restructure, 2006-ongoing; Image credit: Masanori Ikeda  / 2. Kyota Takahashi (Japan), Gift for Frozen Village, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015 ; Image credit: Osamu Nakamura / 3. Antje Gummels (Germany/Japan),
 Traveling Inside, 2009
; Image credit: Isamu Murai   / 4. Chiyoko Todaka (Japan),
 Yamanaka Zutsumi Spiral Works, 2006; Image credit: Hisao Ogose}

Available at: Amazon / Barnes & Noble / PAPress / IndieBound

sabine timm


Oh! I have just found my new happy place… the Instagram feed of Düsseldorf based artist Sabine Timm. I wrote about her teeny tiny work back in 2012, but someone just pointed me to her magical world on Instagram and I’m even more in love than before. I’ll apologize now for all of the time you’re about to spend there… little faces made from bits ‘n pieces, tiny scenes that tell some pretty weird stories. Sigh… so happy, so lovely, so tiny. Happy Monday.

jessica dance


London based Jessica Dance describes herself as an art director, model maker and prop stylist… but I’m going to throw artist in there too because, damn, I wish I thought of this. Comfort food. Yum! Knit by Jessica and photographed by David Sykes. Now, if these plates full of delicious stuff are too comforting, ie., you’re trying to watch the waistline, may I interest you in this much lighter menu from Jessica’s portfolio:


“Paper plates” … get it? Ahh, so good. Happy Monday.

{via Booooooom}

“a really slow magician”


Yes, you’re seeing that correctly. It’s a bunny-deer. Today I’m talking to LA based ceramicist Debra Broz. Her work is so fun, and oh so very labor intensive. They’re like ceramic collages! All of these pieces are one of kind – two pieces truly merged into one… that’s right, no molds… just very precise cutting tools, a truckload of patience, and some major talent. I couldn’t wait to find out how she worked her “slow magic” to reimagine these little animals, and she was kind enough to tell me everything. Listen right up there under the bunny-deer, or subscribe on iTunes. As you’re listening, take a look at the things we talked about in the order that we talked about them. First up, the two-headed lamb that started it all {and a couple of my other favorites}:


Gah! So weird and amazing and bizarre and beautiful! I told her I was going to find a few critters at my local thrift shop so she could work her slow magic with them… this is what I found:


Um, yeah. I’m going to need to see that pig head on something… I’ll have to pack up a box and send him down! Ok, next up, the “Twin Persians” and the horses with hands {ps. she bought the hands in 2007 and the horses 2014… ah, a seven year wait but oh so worth it. They’re now joined in harmony!}


Weird! And wonderful. Here’s the bird/deer that she mentioned. I love this one. Oh, these colors!


I love it all! And before we wrap this up, here are a bunch of links to some other tidbits we talked about:

~ To buy her work, please visit her site, and if you’re brave enough to have her do a commission with your grandmother’s ceramics you can contact her via her site too!

~ If you’re in California before December 27, her work is in a show, titled RE-MADE, at the American Museum of Ceramic Art.

~ Speed-round gem, her favorite movie from her teen years… Reality Bites (classic!)

Thanks so much to Debra for giving us a peek behind the curtain, thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting this episode, and thanks to YOU for listening! There will be more art for your ear next weekend.

keith lemley


Wow. This striking installation, titled The Woods, is the work of American artist Keith Lemley. His portfolio is full of beautiful pieces that use light and nature in really interesting ways… but it was these graphic, clean, glowing axes paired with rough, old stumps of wood that took my breath away. Here’s a snippet from his artist statement:

“My work is about seeing the unseen – the invisible presence which exists in our minds and surrounds all objects, experiences, and memories. Working in my studio in rural Appalachia, I have developed a keen interest in being part of and observing natural systems, time and the process of life and death, and an aesthetic sensibility synthesizing the organic and the machine.”

ps. This work is in a show that opens tomorrow, October 10th at Exhibit A in Corning, NY

{via Yellowtrace}

“blossoms & burlesque”


Today I’m talking to Tiffanie Turner… now, normally I’d be calling her in San Francisco, but today she’s in a beautiful barn in New Hampshire. Yep, she’s in the middle of a wonderful, creative, soul-restoring residency where she’s knee-deep in paper flowers. When we met in 2012, Tiffanie was an at-home-mom who had put her architecture career on hold (indefinitely) and was, well, in flux. Clearly, she has found her way! Book deals, workshops, shows, residencies… and from time to time, she takes her clothes off in front of a crowd. Seriously. Listen right up there, or subscribe on iTunes. As you’re listening, take a look at the things we talked about in the order that we talked about them. First up, a few of her stunning, handmade, often large-scale, paper flowers:


Sigh. Gorgeous. And now, to the barn! This is where she is right now… working away in complete, wonderful, creative solitude:


That’s the mess she was able to leave all over the place… a luxury when you’re used to a studio that also doubles as your family dining table! Oh, and that is the shot of her glue covered fingers that I was concerned about. Next up, a couple of shots from her workshops:


Lovely. Speaking of lovely, here’s Tiffanie in all her burlesque/paper flower beauty:


… gorgeous! Man oh man, I’d be terrified! Tiffanie learned the ropes from Bombshell Betty in San Francisco. Also in San Francisco, a beautiful shop & gallery called Rare Device. This was the location for the “Dead of Winter” show that Tiffanie curated last year. Here she is in action, followed by my collage (that I was thrilled to have included), and her stunning/huge decaying paper flower:


Love. So from a residency in a barn, to a month-long residency at the de Young. Look at this insane space that she’ll call her own next May:


Whoa. Crazy. And I could have stopped there, but I had to include this photo from her gorgeous Instagram feed:


Sexy lady. Maker of beautiful handmade flowers. Exhausted mother. Yep, Tiffanie in a nutshell!  Thank you so much for talking to me, Tiffanie! Thanks to Saatchi Art for supporting the episode, and thank you for listening… there will be more ART FOR YOUR EAR next weekend!


Other links mentioned:

Our friend Katharine Daugherty’s residency in Hudson, NY: Drop Forge & Tool 

Arts funding groups: Fractured Atlas, NY  & Intersection for the Arts, SF

laurent craste


This is the work of Montreal based artist Laurent Craste. All of these pieces are from his series titled, “Abuse”. So strange to see something as delicate as porcelain treated this way, yet not actually broken. Never broken. So beautiful and so powerful… and could be interpreted in so many ways. {I survived an abusive relationship, in my early 20s, and this work gives me chills/makes me a bit sad… but also incredibly proud. Proud that, just like this porcelain, I didn’t break either.}

jen stark


To say that Jen Stark‘s work blows my mind would be a major understatement. I’ve written about her before, and I’ll write about her again. Her attention to detail, her color choices, her unique way of making you look at her work… and INTO her work in the case of those insanely stunning pedestal pieces. Sigh. Yep, all of this colored paper and perfectly “drippy” paint has me wishing that I was going back to school today.

katy krantz


Stunning ceramic necklaces… that happen to be up to 3 feet in length. Amazing. This is the organic, delicate, beautiful, large-scale work of Seattle based ceramics artist Katy Krantz. They are part of an ongoing series titled, The Gifts…. very appropriately named because all of these pieces have just gone to the top of my gift list {hint hint Gregory West}

{Her work used to be available through Totokaelo, a gorgeous shop in Seattle… but not sure where to find it now. If you know, let me know.}

dan abramson


Ok, I’m a little behind the times with these hilariously awesome “Yoga Joes” by Dan Abramson. Apparently there was a kickstarter last year. Well, it must have worked because you can find these old school army men, who have given up their weapons in favor of warrior pose, on Dan’s site.  Ah, just imagine if the world was really like this? Namaste.