medium /// sculpture




lizzie pearce

A self-described “maker of unusual things” … um, yep! Cute meets creepy as little ceramic faces are housed inside felted creatures / mushrooms. This is the whimsical and weird work of UK based artist Lizzie Pearce. I’d love to pick a favorite, but that feels totally impossible. Clearly I need all of them. Happy September!

ps. Some of her work is available in her shop.





rina banerjee

Chills … that’s what the thrifting, treasure hunter in me felt when I saw the sculpture work of New York based artist Rina Banerjee at the Venice Biennale a few weeks ago. Honestly, my heart starting beating faster when I got up close and personal with these crazy collections that Rina has gathered, assembled and then transformed into objects that look like they belong under water or in outer space. Lightbulbs, shells, feathers, rope, beads, antlers, netting, and countless other bits and pieces go into each of her beautifully bizarre creations. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I HAVE to go to my local thrift shop.





shirin gunny

Gasp! No need for paint, paper, or beads when you are surrounded by Mother Nature’s art supplies! This series, titled “Floral Accord”, is the work of Mauritius born, Montreal based artist Shirin Gunny. Here is a small snippet of her story, how these natural wonders came to be:

… After a few wanderings between China and Montreal, Shirin decided to return to her native island. Driven by her passion to create and interest in experimentation, she started looking for unique materials. One day, while foraging and plucking flowers in her tropical garden, she was stunned by the richness of the shapes and colours available at hand. She decided to arrange the organic materials and discovered that the possibilities are endless when it comes to creating ephemeral art using seasonal flowers.

“When I start, I never know what the result will be. It all comes together in a very natural way. Whether it’s the amount of flowers I’ve managed to pluck on that day, the colours and shapes I was able to find. Part of the process feels a bit like magic because I always end up having the exact amount of seeds, petals and leaves that are required to finalise a piece.”

Read her whole story right here … it’s a good one!





josepha gasch-muche

Glass. I know, I was wondering what exactly I was looking at too! It’s glass… thousands of shards of reflective, delicate, glass. The still photos do not do the work of German artist Josepha Gasch-Muche justice! I saw some of her breathtaking work in person last week while attending Glasstress in Venice. Here’s a short video I took in an attempt to do the final piece above a bit of justice:

Happy Monday.

 





joe suzuki

Haring, Warhol, Basquiat … and a whole bunch of colorful poured paint! These paint sculptures {is that a thing?} are the fantastic work of Japanese-American, California based artist Joe Suzuki. Funny, smart, and a modern ode to Pop Art that makes me smile {like a hot pink smiley face}. Here is Joe’s statement:

I consider my work to be artifacts of my own particular culture, which is not the generalized Japanese American culture, but that which formed as a direct result of being a first generation immigrant. Through a long assimilation process, I found myself not fully belonging to either culture, but rather somewhere in between, which I began to call Japamerica.

In my peculiar culture, customs and traditions are born out of misunderstandings or idiosyncrasies, and myths and legends are often formed through the struggles of everyday life. I am fascinated by and curious about my culture’s development and the affect it has on my identity. I see my art making as an investigation that captures and documents my ever changing, mutating, polyglot reality. My work is informed by my life, contingent on my ordinary, real world experiences as a middle class Japamerican dad, who is simply trying to make sense of it all.

{via Artsy}





do ho suh

Gasp! “Home Within A Home” is the work of Korean artist Do Ho Suh. This insane polyester fabric and metal frame house is an installation from 2013, and was shown at the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Seoul. Can you imagine wandering around inside that blue beauty? Breathtaking. Oh… and if you’re going to have a home like that, some of his other work will be, um, a necessity:

So. Good.





eleni pratsi

Oh my circles! Colors bleeding into each other while contained in perfect circles. This is the work of Paris based painter Eleni Pratsi. I love her work – oil and acrylic on canvas – and I love her reasons for obsessing over circles just as much:

“… Beyond doubt, the circle plays a favourable role in my paintings. Treating the circular form as if it were the unique letter of my plastic alphabet is based on a personal choice and backed up by a childhood memory: when asked by my instructor, at the age of eleven, as I took my first art lesson to draw a circle, this turned out to be perfect, to Eliza’s taste. Consciously or unconsciously I recall her overflowing enthusiasm but also my feeling so proud for having traced a circle, my first circle, a perfect circle. With this childhood experience recorded undoubtedly in my subconscious, ten years later I initiated a series of artistic studies through which I’ve been pursuing, ever since, the perfect circle.”

Mission accomplished. Happy Friday.

{via Saatchi Art}





carol milne

Oh my knitted glass! This is the mind-bending (and glass bending) work of Seattle based sculptor Carol Milne. This text, taken from her site, does a wonderful job describing Carol and her work:

Carol is the lone pioneer in the field of knitted glass.   Pushing the limits of her material through persistent and relentless experimentation, determined to combine her passion for knitting with her love for cast glass sculpture, she developed a variation of the lost wax casting process to cast knitted work in glass.

“I see my knitted work as metaphor for social structure.  Individual strands are weak and brittle on their own, but deceptively strong when bound together.  You can crack or break single threads without the whole structure falling apart.  And even when the structure is broken, pieces remain bound together.  The connections are what bring strength and integrity to the whole and what keep it intact.”

Beautiful.

ps. some of her work is available in her online shop.





“that night in toronto” {art show}

Oh, where do I begin? This show is so important to me. It’s an ode to a Canadian great – singer songwriter and front man of The Tragically Hip, Gord Downie. If you’re Canadian you know all about The Hip. For those of you who don’t, they are an iconic band that so many of us know and love. Gord is a musical genius, and sadly was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer last year. You could hear a nation gasp when that news was made public. I wanted to do something, but what? An art show, of course. Here is the curatorial statement for the show that opens THIS SATURDAY, JULY 8th at Mayberry Fine Art in Toronto {4-7pm}

“That Night In Toronto” 

Poetry. That is the best way to describe any and all lyrics written by Gord Downie and The Tragically Hip. From “wheat kings and pretty things”, to “musical chairs, double dares, memorized stairs” the words from these generation defining songs strike a chord in, well, anyone who has ever heard them.  As a curator, and artist, I want to honor this poetry the only way I know how – visually. I asked ten Canadian artists to create original work inspired by their favourite Tragically Hip lyrics. FYI, it was very difficult to choose, which is why some artists have more than one piece in the show! Originally, I was going to assign bits of Hip poetry to each of them, but every artist came back with stories of their favorite songs – memories from road trips, University, concerts, breakups, dance floors, house parties and the list goes on. The paintings, drawings, sculptures, collages, paper-cut pieces they’ve created are beyond what I ever could have imagined. Stunning artwork, each with the magical power to conjure up a song.

This show is a heartfelt tribute from one group of Canadian artists to another – and simply our way of saying, “Hey man, thanks”

ps. Twenty per cent of sales will be donated to the Gord Downie Fund for Brain Cancer Research via Sunnybrook Hospital. 

If you can come, please do. I will be there with bells on, or at least a Hip t-shirt. Mayberry is just across the street from the AGO {324 Dundas Street West}. Send your RSVP to toronto@mayberryfineart.com – see you soon!

Artists {in order shown} : Annyen Lam, Ben Skinner, Meghan Hildebrand, Danielle Krysa {me!}, Sara Genn, Sean William Randall, Don Proch, Jay Dart, Brandy Masch, Sarah Gee Miller





clémentine de chabaneix

Do I even need to say anything? I mean really, that girl holding an alligator kinda says it all, no? This is the ethereal work of French artist Clémentine de Chabaneix. Here are her words about this weird and wonderful work:

…I work with epoxy resin or ceramic, iron and sometimes wood. I often sculpt young ‘Burtonian’ girls, kind of ‘Alice in Wonderland’, teenagers, romantic, a bit gothic. My work is about leaving childhood, metamorphose, struggle… 

Nailed it. Happy Friday.

{found via Club Sensible’s Instagram feed}