medium /// sculpture




liz miller

Works on paper, the wall, and … um … filling the entire room! This fabulous collection of textures and color is the work of American artist Liz Miller. Here’s a snippet from her artist statement:

“I create elaborate site-specific installations that are equal parts absurd, menacing, and poetic. Pattern and tactility confuse and complicate identification, camouflaging recognizable forms and evoking recognition when applied to non-objective forms. The tensions between fact/fiction and dimensionality/flatness are endlessly fascinating to me, playing out in my work as a dialogue between reality and illusion.”

Absurd, menacing, and poetic… love, love, love! ps. Not only is she a working artist, Liz is also a Professor of Installation and Drawing at Minnesota State University-Mankato.





marina dempster

Whoa. These insanely fabulous sculptures/shoes are the work of Toronto based artists Marina Dempster. In the spring of 2021 they were under glass at the Art Gallery of Burlington as part of a two-person show, titled ‘In Visible’, with Meera Sethi {curated by Hitoko Okada}. Each of Marina’s shoes have an in-depth title/description. This is the writing paired with the shoe at the top of the post… with the tongue!

REFLEXIVE
1. directed or turned back on itself / 2. marked by or capable of reflection. / 3. characterized by habitual and unthinking behavior.

This piece speaks to the archetypal challenges of motherhood and an invitation to exercise self-compassionate awareness while inevitability having ones buttons pushed. An invitation to embody, like mother of pearl, ones strength, resilience, and iridescence over time.

Ah, yes, motherhood and the pushing of buttons!





braxton congrove

More art you can eat!? Nope. This gummie-ish chandelier is actually resin, but ooooh, I can almost taste those fruity butterflies! This is the latest work of New York based artist Braxton Congrove – an installation, titled “Celestial Cherry”, shown in March at Peep in Philadelphia. Here’s a lovely description by the show’s curator:

“The exhibition’s focal piece, an intricate multicolored, multilayered chandelier radiates within Peep’s space. Made of cast resin, gradating colors, and occasionally flecks of glitter, the glass-like material casts a translucent glow from its singular light source. Emulating ornate Renaissance interiors, the chandelier’s chains drip with a series of cherry, butterfly, strawberry, banana, and star-shaped charms. A celebration of the beauty in the cheap consumerism of acrylic nail charms, jelly shoes, and Haribo gummies, Celestial Cherry pulls from nostalgia and the heavens, swaddling its viewer in a blanket of escapism.” ~ Julia Greenway, Curator

Yum! Follow Braxton on Instagram at @braxtoncongrove





christine aaron

Oooooh, these sculptures by American artist Christine Aaron take my breath away. Broken glass and chunks of wood coming together in a beautiful, and pretty dangerous, way. For example, the first piece above it titled “No Safety Ne(s)t”. Gorgeous, yes… safe, nope! Here’s a snippet from Christine’s artist statement:

“My work investigates memory, time and the fragility of human connection. Found wood, shattered mirror and hand dyed paper become vehicles for content. The history of these materials, and the traces of process that remain in the completed work speak to the way in which humans hold the physical, mental and emotional marks of personal experience.”

Beautiful… and suddenly those shattered mirrors feel like so much more. Follow her on Instagram at @christineaaronart





amber cowan

“Bubble Bath in the Tunnel of Love”. Well, that title could not be more perfect for yet another absolutely breathtaking glass piece by Philadelphia based artist Amber Cowan. This emerald-hued beauty was featured in the show “Objects: USA 2020” at R & Co Gallery in NYC, curated by Glenn Adamson. Here are Amber’s words about this specific piece:

“My piece is an homage to the innocence of falling in love represented in part by the imagery of the old fashioned tunnel of love carnival ride. The swan cars emerge from the tunnel full of hope bubbles and will quickly and blindly fall over the edge of the jadeite waterfall.  A female figure rests at the base of the mountain bathing in the bubbles and luxuriating in the lushness of the meadow.

This piece is created out of flame-worked and pressed jadeite glass.”

“Objects: USA 2020” included 308 artists ‘inventing new approaches to art-making by way of craft media’, and has toured 22 museums across the US, and 11 cities in Europe!

Follow Amber on Instagram @amber.cowan {Photos of images above by Constance Mensh}





beverly semmes

Oh. My. Word. This is just the tip of the absolutely breathtaking iceberg that is the work of New York based artist and educator Beverly Semmes. She’s a sculptor who incorporates painting, film, photography and performance so, yes, her portfolio is immense. That said, I clearly have a thing for her series of large-scale dresses that flow across the floor, filling entire rooms! She became known for these works in the 1990’s, but if you keep an eye out you can still find recent additions to the series {ie., the piece at the top, titled “Bow (Blue Curtain)”, is from 2016.} This is how Beverly describes these installations:

Imposing and majestic, the dresses cascade down walls, conjuring wearers of power and size.

So powerful. Just imagine seeing that pink piece {complete with wearer!}, titled “Petunia, 2002”, in person? Majestic, indeed.

*Images found via Susan Inglett Gallery & Shoshana Wayne Gallery.




samuelle green

Gasp! This installation, titled “Manifestation 8 : Permutation 1”, is the latest work by American artist Samuelle Green. I wrote about her beehive-like work {made from zillions of paper cones!} in 2019, and so the second I saw these pink velvet chairs show up on Instagram… well, I knew I had to write again! This piece was part of two-person show with Liz Miller, titled “Fiber Filled”, at Spartanburg Art Museum in South Carolina. Here’s a description of Samuelle’s work from her website:

There is structure and design inherent in the natural world which we constantly draw from and take for granted. We generally fail to acknowledge the skill, time, and detail required to manifest the intricate structures found in objects we encounter regularly – such as those found in bird and wasp nests, beehives, spider webs, rock formations, anthills, feathers, and countless others. Samuelle’s work, especially the large scale installations, reference these forms – inspiring contemplation. These natural forms are often met with human made, found objects.

Sigh. Beautiful.





christophe delbeecke

Don’t worry. They aren’t going to pop. Those squishy balloons are squishy at all… they’re resin! That said, they certainly create some drama with a capital D, no? This is the work of Belgian artist Christophe Delbeecke, and here are a few excerpts from an interview he did with Luisa Catucci Gallery, Berlin:

“I really love working with everyday objects because their banality offers a lot of different possibilities. We are so used to these kinds of objects that just a small modification can give them a totally new meaning, giving the chance to create something new and original … I love paradoxical things, because they push us to meditate and think in a deeper way. With the “Balloon Series” I wanted to materialize the tension between the balloons and the sharp objects, which upsets the “pre-installed software” of our brains. In fact, we think that the image we are looking at is actually impossible, but still it exists … The message behind my artworks is very paradoxical as well – it can be positive and full of hope like, for instance, “Nothing can beat me”, but once you switch the objects it can get really negative and hopeless.”

Oof, yes it can… I’m gonna opt for the “nothing can beat me” angle.





“curious matter”, skye gallery aspen

Fine, I won’t try to eat any of these pieces, but wow, that’s alotta eye candy! This absolutely gorgeous, joy-filled, I-wish-I-could-lick-it show is titled “Curious Matter”. Oh, how I’d love to sit in the middle of that happy space for an afternoon… so therapeutic. “Curious Matter” was installed at Skye Gallery Aspen, and featured the work of three fabulous female artists: Dan Lam, Yellena James, and Meghan Shimek. Now, who wants some sugar?

*Install shots by Jason Siegel




“choose your own adventure”

Seattle based artist Emily Counts makes the most magical ceramic sculptures. Some of them hang on the wall, interlocked into beautiful narratives, while others tell their stories standing free… and ALL of them are gorgeous / make me wish i knew how to use a kiln! I have questions about Emily’s childhood {because for some reason I always want to know that part!}, we talked about how she found her way to ceramics, her current process, stained glass, mushrooms, grief, grandmothers, haircuts and more. Don’t worry. It’ll make sense. Look/listen under that lovely photo of Emily in her studio {shot by Amber Fouts for Luxe Magazine}, or subscribe on Apple Podcasts and/or Spotify.

Let’s kick things off with the first piece of Emily’s I ever saw / instantly became obsessed with. It’s titled, “Forage and Pour”:

Looooooove. And yes, I popped another one of her wall pieces in there because, um, how could I not. It’s titled “Catenary Vessel”, and I love it too!

Next, Emily’s CERAMIC MURAL {!?}:

Isn’t that crazy amazing!? You might recognize it because I wrote about it, IN DETAIL, last summer. This was at Facebook’s Redmond, WA location, and part of their Artist-in-Residence program.

Oooh, next… some “portraits”, complete with stained glass eyes etc:

Aren’t they lovely? And they have Emily’s bangs!

Up next, interlocking vessels:

Ah, the mushrooms and flowers she talked about. Magical. Also, I really want to see Emily and her husband try to drink ginger tea out of these at the same time.

Finally, a peek at Emily’s current show, titled Souvenir. at Nationale in Portland:

See? This is why I’m such a HUGE fan of Emily. Oh my word, it’s all so gorgeous. I put in that final image so you could get a better look at the glass. What a renaissance woman! She make do it allllllll. Oh, and great news if you’re in Portland, this show has been extended until July 8th. Thank you so much to Emily for sharing all of her stories with us {and for encouraging me to get a kiln!!!}; thanks to Wireframe for supporting this episode; and great big thanks to YOU for listening. There will be more ART FOR  YOUR EAR next weekend.

Other links:

  1. Emily on Instagram
  2. Bio photo of Emily by Amber Fouts for Luxe Magazine
  3. “Souvenir” at Nationale {until July 8}
  4. studio e gallery {Seattle}
  5. SOIL show!Brooklynn Johnson / Rachel Thomander / Ko Kirk Yamahira
  6. Susannah Montague, Sculptor
  7. Wireframe {Podcast}