fidencio fifield-perez


Paper, maps, paint and pins all living together as a delicate, intricate, important narrative. This is the gorgeous, mind-boggling work of Fidencio Fifield-Perez. He was born in Mexico and grew up in the USA. After graduating from art school, he has focused on creating these beautiful, intricate, paper-cutting mixed media pieces. How do I know this? Well, I got an amazing email from a woman that runs the galleries and visiting artist lecture program at his alma mater. She wanted to make sure people knew about Fidencio’s work, and his very important/timely story:

“… Last semester I hosted an exhibit of paintings and cut paper installations made by one of our alumni, Fidencio Fifield-Perez. Fidencio is a DACA recipient, and has spent his life as an artist advocating for fellow undocumented residents and making gorgeous, pointed artworks about his experience living undocumented in the United States  …  Some of his most poignant works are made from appropriated, painted maps. He cuts away the “real” things the map represents- land, water, cities, people- and leaves the imagined, the drawn- roads, latitudes, boarders. Is this mud? A field to be harvested? A body of water to be crossed? Fence, net, or viscera? Every piece is meticulously cut and pinned to the wall with red map pins.”

Beautiful. The world needs more artists like Fidencio, and more people who send this kind of email.





danielle cole

Yes, yes, yes to all of this! These pieces are part of a new series by Canadian collage artist Danielle Cole. I was already totally in, then I read this chunk of her artist statement and I knew this Danielle and I shared more than just our first name:

“Michelangelo said of his art ‘every block of stone has a statue inside and it is the task of the sculpture to discover it.’ This quote holds true for the construction of all my handmade collage and mixed media work. Sorting through hundreds of images until the magical moment when you get to say: that vacuum belongs in that dinosaur’s hand.”  

Ahhh yes, a woman after my own collage-loving heart. Danielle has a show opening next Thursday, September 14th {till Sept 24th}, at Unloveable Gallery in Toronto. It’s titled “Course of an Empire” and features all of these fabulous cars and legs. Go!





susannah montague

Is it possible to be in love while somewhat terrified? Yes, yes it is. This is the beautifully made, sweet ‘n creepy work of Canadian ceramicist Susannah Montague. Butterflies, bones, and babies … I scoured her site looking for the stories behind these gorgeous / scary pieces, but I believe she’s left it up to our imaginations. At this stage all I really know is that I want to ride around in a row boat with a pink beluga.

ps. I do know why Susannah creates these lovely “blastocysts” though…  “This [work] is about my twins as five day old embryos. The day they got transferred into me.”

Beautiful.





ellen von wiegand

Ahhh, yes. I love linocut prints oh so very much… enter the elegant work of UK based artist Ellen Von Wiegand. I am completely smitten with her color choices, her lovely lines, and her very precise registration {fyi: I minored in printmaking and loved linocuts, but my registration did NOT look like this.} I love getting a sneak peek into an artist’s process… doesn’t seeing those chunks of lino, scraped and carved away make you marvel at those gorgeous final works even more? {although, I have to admit, I’d totally hang a few of those lino ladies on my wall too!}

ps. Ellen has some of these original prints available on her site.





kirsty templeton davidge

Ah, the lovely work of Canadian painter Kirsty Templeton Davidge. When I saw the first image in this post, I assumed it was a photograph. It wasn’t. Then, I assumed she’d been a working artist for years. Wrong again. Kirsty just graduated in 2015 after deciding to go back to school to get her BFA. I was so curious to know what she did in her pre-BFA life. Hand model, perhaps? I emailed her to ask, and this is what she told me:

“… I was a stay at home mother to four kids. I always did things with my hands (made baby clothes, made things for our house etc) but I wanted to find the root of my ‘making’.  I also wanted to get a degree as a life goal so I returned to school and took my BFA.  I worked hard and really focused on becoming better and focused on  the fundamentals – drawing, painting and sculpture.  In my final year I took the painting path.  It is my privilege to paint and because I got a late start, I’m not wasting any time.”

Well, now I assume she’s amazing and totally inspiring … and I’m right this time. Happy Monday. ps. follow her on her brand new Instagram feed!





lizzie pearce

A self-described “maker of unusual things” … um, yep! Cute meets creepy as little ceramic faces are housed inside felted creatures / mushrooms. This is the whimsical and weird work of UK based artist Lizzie Pearce. I’d love to pick a favorite, but that feels totally impossible. Clearly I need all of them. Happy September!

ps. Some of her work is available in her shop.





rina banerjee

Chills … that’s what the thrifting, treasure hunter in me felt when I saw the sculpture work of New York based artist Rina Banerjee at the Venice Biennale a few weeks ago. Honestly, my heart starting beating faster when I got up close and personal with these crazy collections that Rina has gathered, assembled and then transformed into objects that look like they belong under water or in outer space. Lightbulbs, shells, feathers, rope, beads, antlers, netting, and countless other bits and pieces go into each of her beautifully bizarre creations. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I HAVE to go to my local thrift shop.





andrea wan

Gasp! Painted paper-cut pieces … GORGEOUS. This is the latest body of, always elegant and slightly bizarre, work by Hong Kong born, Vancouver raised, and now Berlin based artist Andrea Wan. All of her work is fantastic, but this latest series took my breath away. Oh, and I highly recommend following her on Instagram, because her work in progress shots are absolutely beautiful and totally inspiring. In fact, I’m heading into the studio to put some paint on that scary black paper I’ve been avoiding.





shirin gunny

Gasp! No need for paint, paper, or beads when you are surrounded by Mother Nature’s art supplies! This series, titled “Floral Accord”, is the work of Mauritius born, Montreal based artist Shirin Gunny. Here is a small snippet of her story, how these natural wonders came to be:

… After a few wanderings between China and Montreal, Shirin decided to return to her native island. Driven by her passion to create and interest in experimentation, she started looking for unique materials. One day, while foraging and plucking flowers in her tropical garden, she was stunned by the richness of the shapes and colours available at hand. She decided to arrange the organic materials and discovered that the possibilities are endless when it comes to creating ephemeral art using seasonal flowers.

“When I start, I never know what the result will be. It all comes together in a very natural way. Whether it’s the amount of flowers I’ve managed to pluck on that day, the colours and shapes I was able to find. Part of the process feels a bit like magic because I always end up having the exact amount of seeds, petals and leaves that are required to finalise a piece.”

Read her whole story right here … it’s a good one!





jessica hess

Yep, they’re paintings {close-ups included as cold hard evidence}. This is the work of American artist Jessica Hess. All of these gorgeous pieces are part of her upcoming show, titled “Less is More”, that opens at Hashimoto Gallery in San Francisco this Thursday, August 31 / 6-9pm, and runs until September 23. Here is Hashimoto’s description of this exhibition:

“Less Is More” expands Hess’ ongoing survey of derelict spaces void of human presence. The vivid paintings transport the viewer to locations around the country, such as the Heidelberg project in Detroit or the rural backroads of New England. Hess’ new work develops the narrative set forth by her previous exhibition “More Is More” by detailing the continuous change in these vacated structures. Graffiti saturated buildings have been buffed over, abandoned homes are boarded up and repainted. These subdued moments provoke contemplation of the cyclical nature of our built environments.

The exhibition also highlights key developments in Hess’ creative practice. She continues to skillfully manipulate the reality of her subjects through interventions of painterly abstraction. One piece, entitled “North Adams” {first image above}, portrays an abandoned home, its vibrant color starkly contrasts the surrounding bleak forest. Hess renders the painting to resemble a physical photo collage, offering a glimpse at the intermediary process between her source and its final painted form.

You’re going to go, right? Yes!