teagan mclarnan

Ah, yes. Sometimes, usually on Mondays, paintings that exude a sense of quiet calm is exactly what I need. These succulents and cacti are the work of American painter Teagan McLarnan. She usually works with oil paint, but this lovely series has been created with egg tempera. Those muted colors and matte finish make these pieces even more lovely… happy Monday to you. {I need more coffee}

angela deane

Look, the heart wants what the heart wants, ok!? … And yes, my heart desperately wants these insane flowers by American artist Angela Deane. I’ve written about her fabulous ghosts before, and then earlier today I stumbled across that first rose, and well, here we are. Weird, hilarious, and fun … with just a touch of pure ‘Alice in Wonderland-ish’ terror. Happy Friday!

samantha french

Sigh. I have loved the work of Brooklyn based painter Samantha French for YEARS. Now, Sam is known for her large-scale, underwater oil paintings, which I’ve written about several times and even had her on the podcast to talk about. I’m so smitten with her aqua blue pools filled with reflected sunlight,  so I often just pop over to her website to see what she’s up to…  and this time I found these! Smaller works on paper using gouache…. love, love, love! If you’re looking for a more affordable way to add a Samantha French original to your collection, this might be the way. Also… gouache!? ♥


wayne white : new show

Ok, so, it’s no secret how much I love the work of LA based painter Wayne White, especially his text pieces. Look how brilliant that last painting is?! Those ladies from the original thrift shop painting popping up in front of his gorgeous letters. How? I don’t know. Wayne has a new show opening tomorrow night, titled  I TOOK THE MACHINE APART BUT COULD NOT PUT IT BACK TOGETHER”, at the Joshua Liner Gallery in New York.

The show will be composed of five main components: his signature “word paintings” on vintage offset lithographs, as well as text-based works on paper over the Artist’s painted abstract backgrounds, mixed-media marionettes, and an installation of drawings. The fifth element encompasses the entire gallery, which is painted over with White’s personal doodles, words, and phrases, pulled directly from his notebook. 

Um, that sounds amazing. The opening reception is on Thursday February 8th (6-8pm), oh, and Wayne will be there… ie., GO! ps. The show runs until March 10th.

rochelle redfield

Sigh… I want to take a deep cleansing breath while also jumping for joy! These absolutely gorgeous paintings are the work of American artist Rochelle Redfield. They are all part of her “Confetti Skies” series which are inspired by “Hudson Valley skies and person moments of stormy optimism.” Beautiful.

brenda cablayan

Sigh, I can almost feel the Hawaiian breezes… oh wait, I can! Yep, I’m in Hawaii this week in full-on tourist mode, but oh how I wish I could buy a little pink cottage in the burbs. Alas, I’ll just have to pretend by staring at the work of Oahu based artist Brenda Cablayan. Her paintings might look familiar because I’ve written about her before. I can’t help it! Hawaii is one of my most favorite places on the planet, and there is something absolutely perfect about the way Brenda captures this beautiful spot … not the ‘pina colada’ tourist version, but the ‘regular old day-in-the-life’ version. Granted, it’s a day-in-the-life in paradise, but still.

“paintings, pinholes and pina coladas”

Those are needle-hole perforations in paper… because I know you’re wondering! Today I’m talking to the very prolific artist, and teacher, Wendy Kawabata. I wrote about her needle-hole series, titled “Blind World” a few years ago, but they are just one of many gems in her extensive portfolio. So, this episode is coming to you from Hawaii… I’m in Maui, and Wendy lives on Oahu… mai tais for everyone! Listen right up there under that intricate beauty, or you can subscribe on iTunes.

First up, some of her newest work. Wendy has recently gone back to oil painting after a very long break:

Ahhh, gorgeous! Each of these are titled “Cairns III”, “Cairns II”, and “Cairns VII Here Comes The Sun”.

Now, these pieces are both drawings and mixed media. Wait… is it fabric… or drawings .. or both? …

You can see why I wasn’t sure! The top two are gouache and colored pencil on paper, and the bottom two are gouache, colored pencil, and kantha cloth on paper. Love them all!

Next, the work inspired by her month-long residency in Iceland. This is “In The Land” when it was shown in 2016 at Sanderson Contemporary in New Zealand:

Dreamy, icy watercolors and that amazing crocheted flower piece… which has oh so much more behind it than grey, metallic paint covered flowers.

Oooh, I love this series too {see, prolific!}. This is a gouache and pencil on paper series, titled “Acts”:

Note the “mama”… such a beautiful reason for having that word woven into these drawings from a few years back.

And here we are, the first body of work of Wendy’s that I ever saw. “Blind Worlds”. So gorgeous:

Needle-hole perforations in paper, or as Wendy would say, drawing with holes. Love, love, love!

And finally, this is the piece she mentioned near the beginning… logs covered in crochet with Wendy’s made-up stitches {thank goodness for mothers}:

Beautiful… right stitches or wrong stitches! Thanks so much to Wendy for doing this with me; thanks to Saatchi Art and Thrive for supporting the episode, and thanks to you for listening! There will be more art for your ear, not next weekend but the weekend after that {Feb 17}

Other links:

  1. Material Slip Show, March 4 ~ April 6th
  2. Sanderson Contemporary, NZ
  3. University of Hawaii at Mānoa


holly elander

Gorgeous architecture… with a few “guests”. This is the work of LA based artist Holly Elander, from her series titled Their Home. She grew up in Los Angeles in a mid-century home, and apparently there were many visitors who wandered through from time to time. This is Holly’s ode to her furry and feathered neighbors. Some of these paintings, along with another body of her work, will be in a show that opens tomorrow night at Launch LA… February 3rd until March 3rd / Opening reception is this Saturday, Feb 3rd, 6 – 9pm RSVP to rsvp@launchLA.org

lorien stern

“Chums” … get it!? Hilarious! This is the whimsical and wonderful work of California based artist Lorien Stern. These pieces are part of a show that opens at Hashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco this Saturday, and yes, it’s titled “Chums”…

“Chums focuses on the seemingly dubious relationships between sharks and other maritime creatures. The exhibition features a colorful assortment of the artist’s iconic shark heads as well as an array of fish and birds. Stern is particular interested in the mutually beneficial friendship between pilot fish and sharks. Swimming alongside one another, the fish gain protection from predators, while the shark gains freedom from parasites. In response, the artist created every piece in the exhibition to have a counterpart — each work matches to another through pattern and color. Transcending species and trepidation, Chums celebrates the power of connection.”

The opening reception is this Saturday – February 3rd from 6pm-9pm – and Lorien will be there too! {show runs until February 24}.

diane meyer

Yes, fine, I am absolutely dating myself by loving these pieces so much. In fact that could very well be my first grade class {ok, it’s not, but it totally could be}. This is the work of Los Angeles based artist Diane Meyer. I wrote about her in 2013 but this ongoing series, titled “TIME SPENT THAT MIGHT OTHERWISE BE FORGOTTEN”, is just too good not to follow-up on…

“In the series, cross stitch embroidery has been sewn directly into family photographs. The images are broken down and reformed through the embroidery into a hand-sewn pixel structure. As areas of the image are concealed by the embroidery, small, seemingly trivial details emerge while the larger picture and context are erased. I am interested in the disjunct between actual experience and photographic representation and photography’s ability to supplant memory. By borrowing the visual language of digital imaging with an analog process, a connection is made between forgetting and digital file corruption. The tactility of the pieces also references the growing trend of photos remaining primarily digital- stored on cell phones and hard drives, but rarely printed out into a tangible object.”

Brilliant, nostalgic, lovely. I have to go find my Raggedy Ann doll now.