liya jacobi

 

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Whaaaaat?! Oh my word, I want to push those big buttons and make tiny people float around in water! This is “Waterful : Wonder Rooms”, just one in a series of wonderful waterful-ness, by Tel Aviv based artist Liya Jacobi. Here’s her bio… which makes me wish I went to school to become a TOY MAKER!

Liya Jacobi is a Tel Aviv based artist, toy designer and a special needs advocate with experience in child therapy and graphic design. Jacobi combines traditional craftsmanship with modern intention, creating unique objects while unexpectedly merging form and function. By playing with preconceptions about art and design – the social, cultural and historical relations to objects we all share – she provides a new context. Presenting alternatives to contemporary appliances, she adds unforeseen functionality and a delicate execution to her work. Liya studied Visual Communication at Instituto Europeo di Design in Milan, Italy and Toy Design at Shenker College of Engineering and Design in Tel-Aviv, Israel.

I love everything about this. Happy Friday.

{thanks to @melaart for sharing this work with me!}





betty tompkins

“Women Words” by American artist Betty Tompkins. There are decades of history behind this work, but these are some of the latest iterations of a series that now includes thousands of paintings, and mixed media pieces. These ones, ripped from the pages of art history books*, are the most recent {2017-2020}. I found so many interesting interviews with Betty, that instead of retelling the story, I just pulled my favorite bits from several places:

In 2002 and 2013, Tompkins circulated the following email: “I am considering doing another series of pieces using images of women comprised of words. I would appreciate your help in developing the vocabulary. Please send me a list of words that describe women. They can be affectionate (honey), pejorative (bitch), slang, descriptive, etc. The words don’t have to be in English but I need as accurate a translation as possible. Many, many thanks, Betty Tompkins.” Over 3,500 words and phrases were submitted in seven languages, equally split between men and women. – Gavlak Gallery

Tompkins had bought more than *60 art history textbooks and was tearing out pages, unapologetically defacing some of the world’s best-known paintings and using female figures as canvases for unused suggestions for “Women Words.” “I come from a family where you couldn’t even crack the spine of a book, let alone tear out a page,” she recalled, admitting that “it was a lot of fun!” – Artnet Interview

ELLE: A lot of anger, violence and frustration towards women comes out through this process of audience participation. How do you deal with that?

BT: I have a really good sense of humour, and I think it’s saving my life – and my blood pressure! There was one guy who had written ‘the only thing that would make her more beautiful would be my dick in her mouth’ and I thought, who is this guy? You have to laugh. Someone else had written ‘heck, most people don’t like women’ and I thought ‘okay, let’s think about this one!’ – Elle Magazine Interview

Words on Mona Lisa above: “POOPSIE” IS A WORD USED BY MY EX-BOYFRIEND WHICH I THOUGHT WAS SEXIST AND DEMEANING. HE MIGHT HAVE TREATED ME NICE BUT I WAS HIS CONCUBINE, BOUND FEET, DYSLEXIC, SUZY WONG OR TROPY WIFE. AFTER A SEVEN YEAR REATION, HE GOT HIS 7-YEAR ITCH. HE GOT ME ARRESTED FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AFTER I GOT LAID OFF. I WAS HOMELESS FOR 6 MONTHS. EH ENCOURAGED ME TO COLLECT DISABILITY BENEFITS WHILE HE SURFED THE NET FOR A WIFE. SHE JUST HAPPENS TO BE 29 YEARS OLD. IN ADDITION, HE KEEPS HIS 2 HOUSES IN PROVINCETOWN AS WELL AS HIS RENT-STABILIZED APARTMENT. OF COURSE THERE IS NO WORD FOR A MAN UNLESS HE IS A CASANOVA, A PLAYBOY, AND OTHER POSITIVE THINGS TO PROVE HIS VIRILITY. – via @bettytompkinsart on Instagram

Kick-ass women are my favorite.





mathilde tinturier

Gasp! It’s a teeny tiny magical fairyland! This is the delicate, meticulous work of Swiss artist Mathilde Tinturier. I wrote about her a couple of years ago {2019}, but every time one of her creations scrolls by in my Instagram feed, I catch my breath. Bits of nature – from colorful feathers and seed pods, to found petals and old leaves curling over on themselves – covered in homemade confetti, beads and pins all dangling from the ceiling, being gently moved by the wind. Aaaaand, exhale.

{Her work is available via Le Salon Vert, Geneva.}





tessa eastman

Oooh, I want to hold one of these “clouds” … I won’t try to taste it, I promise. That said, it wouldn’t be my fault if I did take a little lick, because the first two pieces at the top of the post are titled “Lollipop Mint Baby Cloud Bundles”. Yum!  Anyway, this is the ceramic work of UK based artist Tessa Eastman, and here is a description of her work:

“I aim to fix ungraspable states such as fleeting cloud formations, which represent the ideal and the perishable, doom and fantasy”.

[Tessa Eastman] draws inspiration from natural phenomena as seen through a microscope, exploring the strangeness of growth where systems flow and digress.

Grouping work creates a dialogue of congruence and conflict where voluminous cloud-like shapes exploring the theme of space pushing outwards are juxtaposed with mesh structures revealing the internal. The tension between internal and external relates to receptacles where positive and negative space are equally valued, and also to the body where the void permits life. It is through sensitivity to form and glaze that Tessa’s sculptures become animated and much time is invested in research and testing. Tessa says: “Colour is inspiring and creates a distinction between the sum of parts. Matt and shiny, coarse and smooth and hot and cool coloured glazes offer depth of character.”

Okay, now I really want to hold one.

{List of galleries/places to see Tessa’s work.}





eric louie

Ah, the absolutely gorgeous, totally mind-bending work of Vancouver based painter Eric Louie. Yes, I said painter… large-scale oil on canvas to be exact. Every time one of Eric’s pieces scrolls by on Instagram, I catch my breath. Colorful metallic ribbons… that aren’t metal or ribbons!? Here’s part of his artist statement:

“My paintings have always had a sensibility towards the natural order of things. I’m interested in creating events that both acknowledge and deny spatial illusion simultaneously. I feel as though there never is an end to these works in their self -fulfillment, which is exciting and challenging to me. My process in the beginning is to make a painting in response to one of its predecessors. None of the works are planned and continually change course until they come to some resolve where I can let them go. The forms are invented during the process, some of which survive until the end, others lost in the many layers of thin glazes of paint.”

‘Acknowledging and denying spatial illusion simultaneously’ … ummm, CHECK! Happy Monday.





“authenticity will never do you wrong”

Today’s episode is filled with insight, laughter… and paper made from old jeans? Yep. I wrote about American artist Rebecca Hutchinson a few weeks ago, and immediately had oh so many questions. There was something about pulp and handmade paper, but also porcelain some of which was fired and some wasn’t? Don’t worry, I got all of the answers! Rebecca and I talked about her childhood on the farm, how she found her way to sculpture, and not only did we get elbow deep in paper pulp, we also rolled up our sleeves and talked a LOT about how to deal with rude inner critics. Spoiler alert, sometimes it involves a mini trampoline! Seriously. You can listen right up there under Rebecca and “Orange Burst”, or subscribe on Apple Podcasts and or Spotify.

First, this is the work I shared a few weeks ago. There’s a little sampling of everything… artwork for the ceiling, wall and floor:

See? This is why I had to get her on the podcast immediately.

Okay, but wait. Before we get into the process shots and video, I just had to share these pieces. Apparently, I’m a sucker for work that hangs from the ceiling:

Oh my word. So. GORGEOUS.

Alright, here we go. Rebecca’s studio {most shots are from her summer studio in Montana… you’ll understand why in a second}, and a couple of process videos:

Ahhhhhhh! Can you imagine spending the summer working in that gorgeous Montana studio, arm deep in paper pulp? Count me in! And, look at all of that teamwork in action… love, love, love.

Next up, a little peek at Rebecca’s current show, “Midnight Blooms”, happening right now until February 28th, at the Danforth Art Museum in Framingham, MA:

Blue!!!! Sigh. So dreamy. Speaking of dreamy, that little farm girl from the beginning of the episode is still very  much inspired by Mother Nature:

A sunset transformed into supplies. Yep, I’d be totally inspired working there all summer, too. Thank you so much to Rebecca for coming on the podcast, and thanks to you for listening. Now, all of you, go find a mini trampoline and jump all of that self doubt right out!

Other links:

  1. Rebecca on Instagram
  2. “Midnight Blooms”, her current show at Danforth Art Museum {until Feb 28, 2021}
  3. Upcoming Workshop at Harvard
  4. Adelaine Muth, Artist {Rebecca’s studio assistant} 
  5. Archie Bray Foundation
  6. UMass

 





audie murray

Okay, I cannot deal with how much I love this series… Pop literally meeting culture. To be clear, she also works with gloves, objects, and textiles, but these beautifully beaded socks were calling my name!  This is the intricate and personal work of Audie Murray. Here’s part of her bio, and description of her practice:

Audie Murray is a multi-disciplinary artist who works with various materials including beadwork, quillwork, textiles, repurposed objects, drawing, and media. She is Michif, raised and working in Regina, Saskatchewan, treaty 4 territory. Much of her family and family histories are located in the Qu’Appelle and Meadow Lake regions of Saskatchewan.

Audie’s art practice is informed by the process of making and visiting. Her practice explores themes of contemporary culture and how this relates to experiences of duality and connectivity. Working with specific material choices, she often uses found objects from daily life and transmutes them. This practice is a way to reclaim and work through various subject matter, much of it relating to the body, space, and relationships with a focus on the intersection and expansion of time.

Brilliant. The photo of Audie is from a few years ago, but I love how the socks are incased and just had to include it in the post. Happy Friday.





ian davenport

Gasp! That’s exactly the sound I made in 2017 when I stood in front of the final piece above, titled “Colourfall”, installed at the Giardini during the Venice Biennale. It was ridiculously hot that day, and so I wasn’t completely sure if I was melting or if the art was! All of these “poured paintings” are the work of London based artist Ian Davenport {there he is sweating in the Venetian humidity while taking care of the finishing touches}. Here’s a description of Ian’s work:

Davenport’s artistic is an exploration of line and form in paint. Driven by an enduring fascination with the materiality of paint, his signature technique is to allow the fluid properties of the medium to form compositions of vibrant colours in defined lines across his support. The Artist’s intent is evident in the carefully composed series of colours that appear in his paintings, exploring colour relationships and guided by his intuition and decades of experience as a painter. Davenport often uses groups of colours from a historical painting as a reference point to initiate his own sequences. Inherent in his process is the question of how colour gives shape and structure to an image and how it produces rhythm and dynamism in abstract art. ~ via Jenna Burlingham Fine Art

Ah, what I wouldn’t give to be sweating beside that poured rainbow in Venice again. One day.

{Thanks to @taxcollection – and this insane video they just posted – for reminding me of Ian’s fabulous work}





cameron kester

Okay, it’s a three-way tie for my fave: “Send Noods”, “Sometimes She’s a Latte”, and “I’m Sure She Had Her Raisins”. Bahahaha! Hilarious titles, beautiful drawings… WIN, WIN, WIN! This is the work of Japan based, American artist Cameron Kester. Here’s her part of her bio/statement:

Cameron’s art is visually marked by feminine and delicate details and colors, contrasted with sassy, crass and irreverent humor to showcase mundane objects, delving into their contemporary as well as their historical contexts, often pairing them with the female figure. Equally important to her work is her witty, humorous, and often poignant titles. She considers herself a “fowl-mouthed absurdist,” and while that is true, like her work, her words and her personality contain layers of beauty as well as absurdity.

As Cameron says, “Ultimately, I use oddities and silliness to question how values and beliefs are manufactured and how we construct our own place in the universe.”

Cameron’s focus is on the medium of pencil drawings, often the first step of a “serious” work of art, which makes it another element in Cameron’s brilliant and witty arsenal.

Brilliant and witty, indeed! ps. #SendNoods





lisa stevens aka “lisa seaurchin”

Well, usually around this time of year I’m writing my posts from Hawaii. Clearly we won’t be going this year, but oh my goodness I miss the ocean, the warm breezes, and all of the vibrant colors. And so, instead, I give you these beauties! This is the work of UK based artist Lisa Stevens. I found her on Instagram, where she’s known as @lisaseaurchin … appropriate, no? Here is a quick description of how she works:

“The main body of my work … is primarily influenced by the clay itself. I do not fight with the clay to make neat edges and smooth, even surfaces, preferring instead to leave the tool marks, the raw edges, and the natural texture of the clay … I also take reference form sea creatures, such as coral, jellyfish and of course, sea urchins. I love working with textures and a lot of my work is pierced. I do not smooth the piercing, but instead, choose to keep the barnacle effect as the clay splits as the tool moves through it.”

Sigh. Aloha.